What we're about

Knapsack is a multiracial group committed to challenging the system of racism in the United States and the world. We engage in dialogue, build community, and support the efforts of racial justice leaders and organizations. We are dedicated to the struggle for shared liberation.

Upcoming events (5+)

September Accountability and Support Session

Social Innovation Forum

We'll have time for each person to share one piece of their anti-racism work (could be something still in the planning stage) and then discuss as a group. Here are some questions we will consider: *What am I doing (personally or part of a group effort) to dismantle or counter racism/white supremacy? *What have I done to challenge, push, or support others in dealing with racism/white supremacy? *How do I know my efforts are worthwhile? *What do I need in order to continue my anti-racism work or do more? Here are some resources around Accountability from Racial Equity Tools: http://www.racialequitytools.org/plan/change-process/accountability We do our best to have one accountability/support session each month. If you are unable to attend and want to be part of accountability, please let us know and we'll work on accommodating you. Note: even if you don't claim to be doing anti-racism work, you can come to the session and see what it is about, and consider what you might do.

book discussion: White Fragility (Framingham or Natick*)

by Robin DiAngelo, PhD.: "White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress. Although white racial insulation is somewhat mediated by social class (with poor and working class urban whites being generally less racially insulated than suburban or rural whites), the larger social environment insulates and protects whites as a group through institutions, cultural representations, media, school textbooks, movies, advertising, and dominant discourses. Racial stress results from an interruption to what is racially familiar. In turn, whites are often at a loss for how to respond in constructive ways, as we have not had to build the cognitive or affective skills or develop the stamina that that would allow for constructive engagement across racial divides, leading to what I refer to as White Fragility. White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium. This book explicates the dynamics of White Fragility and how we might build our capacity in the on-going work towards racial justice." source: https://robindiangelo.com/publications/ Join us to discuss this book. We'll share what stood out for us...what challenged us, what we learned, favorite passage, and more. Come with a question you have for others about the book. This is the 3rd time this book has been discussed with Deb as the facilitator as different folks can attend on different dates and there continues to be interest. We hope you can join us this time if the last dates didn't work for you! - Parking (free) is available on the street and in a lot behind the restaurant. Let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Meeting location suggestions welcome. * If more than 8 folks sign up for this meeting, we will meet instead at Common Street Spiritual Center in Natick center. Please check in here before the meeting to see if that is happening. - RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change, PLEASE! Our book discussions so far: - "So You Want to Talk About Race" by Ijeoma Oluo - "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" by Andrea J. Ritchie - "The Hate U Give" by Angie Thomas - "You Have the Right to Remain Innocent" by James Duane - "Neither Wolf Nor Dog, On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder" by Kent Nerburn "White Trash. The 400-Year Untold History of Class" by Nancy Isenberg "On the Other Side of Freedom, The Case for Hope" by DeRay Mckesson

Attend "The Watering Hole": Project 1619

Community Change Inc

We'll participate in this event of Community Change, Inc., our parent organization. This is a time to be in community with others who are fiercely committed to anti-racism work and the dismantling of white supremacy. This month the conversation will feature Project 1619. Please fill out this form to RSVP: https://forms.gle/ojiXvn6Uojq8LRUP7 Accessibility Information: Community Change, Inc. (http://www.communitychangeinc.org/) is located in an office building. It is wheelchair accessible by using elevator #5 (furthest to the right as you approach the elevators). If it isn't there, keep pressing the button until it comes. The bathrooms are designated "Men" and "Women" and have stalls. Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you.

book discussion: Unraveling the "Model Minority" Stereotype (Framingham)

"This book set in motion much-needed interest in the model minority myth as a topic vital to understanding the educational achievement of Asian American youth. In this update to her groundbreaking work, Stacey Lee explores the continuing significance of the model minority stereotype in the wake of legislation that has dramatically altered the landscape of education. In an expanded introduction and conclusion, Lee looks at recent research to uncover the ways in which the larger structures of race and class play out in the lives of Asian American high school students. The text presents the experiences of these students in their own words, providing a uniquely authentic inside perspective on identity and interethnic relations in an American community. This second edition is essential reading for anyone interested in Asian American youth and their experience in U.S. schools." Source: https://books.google.com/books/about/Unraveling_the_model_Minority_Stereotype.html?id=sIDuAAAAMAAJ Join us to discuss this book. We will meet at Pho Dakao in Framingham. Come prepared to order at least one thing. Some of us will be eating dinner during the discussion. Let's share what stood out for us...what challenged us, what we learned, favorite passage, and more. Come with a question you have for others about the book. - Parking (free) is available on the street and in a lot behind the restaurant. Let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Meeting location suggestions welcome. - Please RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change. This group is a part of Boston Knapsack Anti-Racism Group. Our book discussions so far: - "So You Want to Talk About Race" by Ijeoma Oluo - "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" by Andrea J. Ritchie - "The Hate U Give" by Angie Thomas - "You Have the Right to Remain Innocent" by James Duane - "Neither Wolf Nor Dog, On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder" by Kent Nerburn For Feb.: "White Trash. The 400-Year Untold History of Class" by Nancy Isenberg "On the Other Side of Freedom, The Case for Hope" by DeRay Mckesson "White Fragility" by Robin DiAngelo, PhD.

Past events (675)

Photos (309)