• EJI Chronology...a racial (in)justice history activity (Natick)

    Ever want to learn more about history not taught about racial injustices? In this activity made from Equal Justice Initiative's "A History of Racial Injustice" calendar, teams (or individuals depending on the attendance) build their own timeline of events from the calendar (and learn more about the events in the process). For each turn, your team will read a historical event from a card (with date hidden). Your team guesses the date, and decides where that event falls in your timeline. If your team is correct about the placement, you keep the card and your timeline grows. We will see which team can first build a timeline of 10 cards. We will take time to add details anyone knows about events on the cards (to gain more points for our team and make it even more of a learning experience). We will meet in a casual restaurant and do this activity while (or after) we eat. Please be prepared to order a drink, at least. Learn more about Equal Justice Initiative and their calendars: https://eji.org/history-racial-injustice-calendar This is the original timeline game this activity is designed after: http://buffalogames.com/chronology/ Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Free parking is available nearby on the street and in a lot.

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  • History and Currency (RJD: Natick)

    Common Street Spiritual Center

    We will discuss history and the power of what's on currency. Specifically history about Andrew Jackson, Harriet Tubman, and the currency controversy. We will share reactions to the stamping of $20 bills before the Treasury Department actually starts printing the new Tubman twenties in 2028 (maybe). Collect your $20 bills to bring and stamp during this meetup! Paul, now on our co-facilitation team, brought this topic to us and will co-facilitate this discussion. From Paul: I've been stamping Tubman on my twenties since I read this article in the Washington Post and ordered the stamp: https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2019/05/24/harriet-tubman-is-already-appearing-bills-whether-trump-officials-like-it-or-not/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.bd7da1fceecb https://tubmanstamp.com/ https://www.cnbc.com/2019/05/22/harriet-tubman-20-bill-no-longer-coming-in-2020.html >>> Monthly meeting overview: We are committed to challenging the system of racism in the United States and the world. We are dedicated to the struggle for shared liberation. Join in the conversation as we continue to get real about the problem of racism in our world, and move toward personal and collaborative action. Our dialogues are opportunities to talk openly about racism and other forms of oppression in our society. Please join us to continue sharing our experiences, hopes and dreams about living in community beyond race. All are welcome. - This group meets the first Saturday of each month...now in the Moon Room on the 2nd floor. Come in the side door off of School Street. The meeting topics come from votes done at meetings. - Parking is available, and the Worcester Line of the commuter rail stops in Natick, walking distance away. - Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Note: there is a ramp near the main entrance, and an elevator available. The elevator is tricky so please arrange to meet one of us five minutes or so before the meeting so we can help. - Please RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change. Deb will add +#s to her RSVP to show folks signing up on other sites for this meeting.

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  • Attend "The Watering Hole": The 1619 Project

    Community Change Inc

    We'll participate in this event of Community Change, Inc., our parent organization. This is a time to be in community with others who are fiercely committed to anti-racism work and the dismantling of white supremacy. This month the conversation will feature the New York Times' The 1619 Project. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html Please fill out this form to RSVP: https://forms.gle/ojiXvn6Uojq8LRUP7 Accessibility Information: Community Change, Inc. (http://www.communitychangeinc.org/) is located in an office building. It is wheelchair accessible by using elevator #5 (furthest to the right as you approach the elevators). If it isn't there, keep pressing the button until it comes. The bathrooms are designated "Men" and "Women" and have stalls. Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you.

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  • book discussion: White Fragility (Framingham*)

    by Robin DiAngelo, PhD.: "White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress. Although white racial insulation is somewhat mediated by social class (with poor and working class urban whites being generally less racially insulated than suburban or rural whites), the larger social environment insulates and protects whites as a group through institutions, cultural representations, media, school textbooks, movies, advertising, and dominant discourses. Racial stress results from an interruption to what is racially familiar. In turn, whites are often at a loss for how to respond in constructive ways, as we have not had to build the cognitive or affective skills or develop the stamina that that would allow for constructive engagement across racial divides, leading to what I refer to as White Fragility. White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium. This book explicates the dynamics of White Fragility and how we might build our capacity in the on-going work towards racial justice." source: https://robindiangelo.com/publications/ Join us to discuss this book. We'll share what stood out for us...what challenged us, what we learned, favorite passage, and more. Come with a question you have for others about the book. This is the 3rd time this book has been discussed with Deb as the facilitator as different folks can attend on different dates and there continues to be interest. We hope you can join us this time if the last dates didn't work for you! - Parking (free) is available on the street and in a lot behind the restaurant. Let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Meeting location suggestions welcome. * If more than 8 folks sign up for this meeting, we will meet instead at Common Street Spiritual Center in Natick center. Please check in here before the meeting to see if that is happening. - RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change, PLEASE! Our book discussions so far: - "So You Want to Talk About Race" by Ijeoma Oluo - "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" by Andrea J. Ritchie - "The Hate U Give" by Angie Thomas - "You Have the Right to Remain Innocent" by James Duane - "Neither Wolf Nor Dog, On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder" by Kent Nerburn "White Trash. The 400-Year Untold History of Class" by Nancy Isenberg "On the Other Side of Freedom, The Case for Hope" by DeRay Mckesson

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  • September Accountability and Support Session

    Social Innovation Forum

    We'll have time for each person to share one piece of their anti-racism work (could be something still in the planning stage) and then discuss as a group. Here are some questions we will consider: *What am I doing (personally or part of a group effort) to dismantle or counter racism/white supremacy? *What have I done to challenge, push, or support others in dealing with racism/white supremacy? *How do I know my efforts are worthwhile? *What do I need in order to continue my anti-racism work or do more? Here are some resources around Accountability from Racial Equity Tools: http://www.racialequitytools.org/plan/change-process/accountability We do our best to have one accountability/support session each month. If you are unable to attend and want to be part of accountability, please let us know and we'll work on accommodating you. Note: even if you don't claim to be doing anti-racism work, you can come to the session and see what it is about, and consider what you might do.

    5
  • The Plight of One Woman is the Plight of All Women (RJD: Natick)

    Common Street Spiritual Center

    We are honored to have Lilly Marcelin, the Founding and Executive Director of Resilient Sisterhood Project, be our guest speaker for this follow up discussion about reproductive rights. We will discuss statistics and build our awareness of the plight of women in health care. Lilly's grandma used to say what we are using for the title of this meeting; this reminds us about the ongoing practice of seeing commonality and finding empathy. (Participation in the first part of this discussion is not required.) All are welcome. So you can prepare, our warm up question that we want all to share during the introductions is: What question do you have about reproductive health and rights in marginalized communities? See Resilient Sisterhood Project's website for more info, and learn about the recent event held at Wellesley College: "Remembering our Foremothers in Gynecology: The Hidden Contributions of Anarcha, Betsey and Lucy": https://www.rsphealth.org/home Reading list from Part 1, July 6 (FYI): What is Reproductive Justice? by SisterSong: https://www.sistersong.net/reproductive-justice/ RJ Founding Mothers, the women who wrote the 1994 statement about reproductive care access: https://bwrj.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/151/ Black Women on Universal Health Care Reform, the text of their statement: https://bwrj.wordpress.com/2012/08/08/black-women-on-universal-health-care-reform/ >>> Monthly meeting overview: We are committed to challenging the system of racism in the United States and the world. We are dedicated to the struggle for shared liberation. Join in the conversation as we continue to get real about the problem of racism in our world, and move toward personal and collaborative action. Our dialogues are opportunities to talk openly about racism and other forms of oppression in our society. Please join us to continue sharing our experiences, hopes and dreams about living in community beyond race. All are welcome. - This group meets the first Saturday of each month...now in the Moon Room on the 2nd floor. Come in the side door off of School Street. The meeting topics come from votes done at meetings. - Parking is available, and the Worcester Line of the commuter rail stops in Natick, walking distance away. - Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Note: there is a ramp near the main entrance, and an elevator available. The elevator is tricky so please arrange to meet one of us five minutes or so before the meeting so we can help. - Please RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change. Deb will add +#s to her RSVP to show folks signing up on other sites for this meeting.

    1
  • Attend "The Watering Hole"

    Community Change Inc

    We'll participate in this event of Community Change, Inc., our parent organization. This is a time to be in community with others who are fiercely committed to anti-racism work and the dismantling of white supremacy. We can talk about current events, the work within the community, or just how we are taking care of ourselves during these turbulent times. Please fill out this form to RSVP: https://forms.gle/awB56AXJsZhvkozJ8

    1
  • EJI Chronology...a racial (in)justice history activity (Natick)

    Ever want to learn more about history not taught about racial injustices? In this activity made from Equal Justice Initiative's "A History of Racial Injustice" calendar, teams (or individuals depending on the attendance) build their own timeline of events from the calendar (and learn more about the events in the process). For each turn, your team will read a historical event from a card (with date hidden). Your team guesses the date, and decides where that event falls in your timeline. If your team is correct about the placement, you keep the card and your timeline grows. We will see which team can first build a timeline of 10 cards. We will take time to add details anyone knows about events on the cards (to gain more points for our team and make it even more of a learning experience). We will meet in a casual restaurant and do this activity while (or after) we eat. Please be prepared to order a drink, at least. Learn more about Equal Justice Initiative and their calendars: https://eji.org/history-racial-injustice-calendar This is the original timeline game this activity is designed after: http://buffalogames.com/chronology/ Please let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Free parking is available nearby on the street and in a lot.

    4
  • August Accountability and Support Session

    Social Innovation Forum

    We'll have time for each person to share one piece of their anti-racism work (could be something still in the planning stage) and then discuss as a group. Here are some questions we will consider: *What am I doing (personally or part of a group effort) to dismantle or counter racism/white supremacy? *What have I done to challenge, push, or support others in dealing with racism/white supremacy? *How do I know my efforts are worthwhile? *What do I need in order to continue my anti-racism work or do more? Here are some resources around Accountability from Racial Equity Tools: http://www.racialequitytools.org/plan/change-process/accountability We do our best to have one accountability/support session each month. If you are unable to attend and want to be part of accountability, please let us know and we'll work on accommodating you. Note: even if you don't claim to be doing anti-racism work, you can come to the session and see what it is about, and consider what you might do.

    1
  • book discussion: White Fragility (Natick)

    Common Street Spiritual Center

    by Robin DiAngelo, PhD.: "White people in North America live in a social environment that protects and insulates them from race-based stress. This insulated environment of racial protection builds white expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the ability to tolerate racial stress. Although white racial insulation is somewhat mediated by social class (with poor and working class urban whites being generally less racially insulated than suburban or rural whites), the larger social environment insulates and protects whites as a group through institutions, cultural representations, media, school textbooks, movies, advertising, and dominant discourses. Racial stress results from an interruption to what is racially familiar. In turn, whites are often at a loss for how to respond in constructive ways, as we have not had to build the cognitive or affective skills or develop the stamina that that would allow for constructive engagement across racial divides, leading to what I refer to as White Fragility. White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium. This book explicates the dynamics of White Fragility and how we might build our capacity in the on-going work towards racial justice." source: https://robindiangelo.com/publications/ Join us to discuss this book. We'll share what stood out for us...what challenged us, what we learned, favorite passage, and more. Come with a question you have for others about the book. 8/1 note: we changed the location due to the interest - Parking (free) is available on the street and in a lot behind the Center. Let us know your needs so we can help make the event accessible for you. Meeting location suggestions welcome. - RSVP if you can come to this meeting, and change it if your plans change, PLEASE! Our book discussions so far: - "So You Want to Talk About Race" by Ijeoma Oluo - "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" by Andrea J. Ritchie - "The Hate U Give" by Angie Thomas - "You Have the Right to Remain Innocent" by James Duane - "Neither Wolf Nor Dog, On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder" by Kent Nerburn For Feb.: "White Trash. The 400-Year Untold History of Class" by Nancy Isenberg "On the Other Side of Freedom, The Case for Hope" by DeRay Mckesson

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