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Atlanta Hadoop Users Group Message Board › Will PaaS Finally Bring Open Source Love to the Enterprise?

Will PaaS Finally Bring Open Source Love to the Enterprise?

A former member
Post #: 4
Open source platform as a service (PaaS) platforms are one of the most exciting topics in the software industry nowadays. Following the $212M acquisition of Heroku by Salesforce.com, we’ve seen how, in a matter of months, platforms like dotCloud, VMWare’s Cloud Foundry or Red Hat’s OpenShift have emerged with complete PaaS suites based on popular open source technologies.
The value proposition behind this type of PaaS offering is very simple: these platforms will enable the foundation to host, manage, provision and scale solutions based on some of the most renowned open source technologies such as Ruby on Rails, Hadoop, and MySQL.
When we start exploring these technologies in detail, we will quickly realize that they could have a profound impact on the enterprise software industry, changing the economics and cultural aspects of the open source model.
For the last 20 something years, open source technologies have been fighting an uphill battle to gain a wide adoption within traditional business that favors commercial software alternatives. Lack of support options, poor documentation, or vendor commitment are some of the reasons (or prejudices  ) that are often seen as limitations of open source technology stacks. Those years of anti-open source religion have had a deep influence on the software markets. If you think about it, other than JBoss, MySQL or SpringSource, we can’t cite many other big exits of open source technology vendors. While it is true that the number of exits or acquisitions is not in direct correlation to the viability of a business model, it’s a pretty good indicator of the health and stability of a specific market segment.

More at http://openstackapi.com­
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