• *SOLD OUT* Yerkes Research Center Field Station Open House - Fall 2018
    - This event is a production of Yerkes National Primate Research Center (http://www.yerkes.emory.edu/index.html) of Emory University. - An RSVP here does *not* count as an RSVP for the open house. - You *must* follow the instructions below to RSVP officially. - Tours run continually from 8:30 am until 10:30 am. - You will receive driving directions and other details by email from Yerkes no later than several days prior to the open house. - Please direct all questions you have about this event or about your RSVP to [masked]. __________ Yerkes Research Center Field Station Open House - Fall 2018 Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University has cordially invited members of the Atlanta Science Tavern to their fall open house for their Field Station in Lawrenceville the morning of Saturday, October 20, 2018. The first tour group will depart at 8:30 am and the last one at 10:30 am. Tours run continually. Mandatory RSVP instructions Please RSVP to [masked] as soon as possible and no later than Friday, September 28. To RSVP you *must* send an email to [masked] with all of the following: 1) FSOH in subject; 2) First and last name of each person in your group; 3) Ages of those 17 and younger; 4) Street address; 5) Email address; 6) Phone number; 7) "Atlanta Science Tavern" as your affiliation with Yerkes; and 8) If you plan to bring a service animal (Yerkes will follow up for more information). Note: if this events reaches capacity before the RSVP deadline, you will placed on the waiting list. Be patient, it may take some time for you to receive a confirmation of your email. You will receive driving directions and other details from Yerkes several days prior to the event. Note: if the event reaches event capacity before the RSVP deadline, Yerkes will place you on the waiting list Email [masked] with any questions regarding the status of your RSVP. Special notes • Children 1 year old or older are welcome. Those ages 1 to 4 must be in strollers. • Parking is limited, so please carpool. • Dress for outdoors and wear closed-toe shoes. • Photography is prohibited. Yerkes appreciates donations of empty paper towel and toilet paper rolls, phone books and unopened boxes of plain Cheerios, Corn Flakes and Rice Krispies. They give these to the animals as part of their enrichment program. Yerkes also welcomes financial donations to help support their research: http://www.yerkes.emory.edu/support/index.html.

    Yerkes Research Center Field Station

    Location to be Announced by Email · Lawrenceville, GA

    3 comments
  • New Developments in High Mass Star Formation - Agnes Scott Bradley Observatory
    - This event is a production of the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Agnes Scott College (https://www.agnesscott.edu/physics/) made possible with support from the Georgia Space Grant Consortium. - It is free and open to the public. - RSVPs are not required to attend. - Seating is on a first-come basis. - Doors open at 7:30 pm. - The lecture begins at 8:00. - Refreshments will be served. - Refer to this page (https://www.agnesscott.edu/bradleyobservatory/directions-and-parking.html) for directions as well as the notes at the bottom of the description below. - A planetarium show and viewing with the observatory telescopes (weather permitting) will follow the lecture. ______________________ New Developments in High Mass Star Formation - Agnes Scott Bradley Observatory Theresa "Terry" Melo, Agnes Scott '19 Sara Solomon, Agnes Scott '20 Our understanding of massive star formation (MSF) is informed by observations of ultracompact (UC) HII regions, which consist of ionized hydrogen around young, high mass stars. During the summer of 2018, Theresa Melo (ASC ‘19) and Sara Sloman (ASC ‘20) completed NSF-supported research in MSF with Dr. Chris De Pree, as part of the STEM Scholars Program at Agnes Scott College. Using Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the MSF region W49A taken in 1994 and 2015, students Melo and Sloman learned the data reduction process, and created a final multi-configuration image of W49A in both special lines (Radio Recombination Lines) and the radio continuum. During this fall semester, student researchers have been able to continue the reduction and analysis of these datum to identify significant differences between emission from 1994 and 2015. This months’s talk will introduce the basics of high mass star formation, radio observations, and star formation in W49A region, one of the most luminous star forming regions in the Milky Way. About the speakers Theresa “Terry” Melo is a senior majoring in Astrophysics from Chicago, Illinois. She is a member of Posse 3, a leadership scholarship that identifies, recruits, and trains a group of students that are sent together to college. She hopes to go to graduate school to obtain her graduate degree in astronomy. Her interests include radio astronomy, stellar evolution, and computational applications. At Agnes Scott, she is a student researcher working with Dr. Chris De Pree on Massive Star Formation and a tutor at the Center for Writing and speaking. Sara Sloman is a junior from Johns Creek, Georgia majoring in Astrophysics and Math. She hopes to continue her studies after graduating from Agnes Scott, pursuing a graduate degree in physics or mathematics. Sara is a current Georgia Space Grant Consortium outreach fellow for the Bradley Observatory and is also a student researcher working with Dr. De Pree on Massive Star Formation. She serves on the executive board as the treasurer for both the Society of Physics Students and the Catholic Student Organization, and is an active member of the GEMS living-learning community on campus. Sara is also a lifetime member of the Girl Scouts. ______________________ Parking Handicapped-accessible parking is available adjacent to the observatory. Other visitors are requested to use campus parking lots accessible via E. Dougherty St. and South McDonough St. There is on-street parking along E. Dougherty, or in the parking lot to your right past the Mary Brown Bullock Science Center. Additional parking is available in the West Parking Facility on S. McDonough St. Follow Dougherty to the four-way stop, either turn left and take your first left into the parking lot, or turn right and park in the large parking deck on the left.

    The Bradley Observatory of Agnes Scott College

    E. Dougherty Street · Decatur, GA

  • New answers to old questions about stars, rocks, and the origin of life at FSC
    - This event is a production of Fernbank Science Center (FSC) in association with the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution. - Admission is free and open to the public. - Seating is on a first-come basis; RSVPs are not required to attend. - The location of this event is Fernbank Science Center, not to be confused with the Fernbank Museum of Natural History. The Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution invites you to attend a world premier of a new planetarium show at Fernbank Science Center entitled "Origin of Life: New Answers to Old Questions about Stars, Rocks and Life.” Doors will open at 7:00 pm to allow visitors to view Fernbank’s famous meteorite collection, Denver Museum's collections of minerals important in life's origins, and the actual command module from Apollo 6. The half-hour full-dome planetarium presentation will start at 7:30 and will be followed by a opportunity to discuss questions about life origins with scientists working in that field.

    Fernbank Science Center Planetarium

    156 Heaton Park Drive · Atlanta, GA

    7 comments
  • Non-Euclidean virtual reality - a Frontiers in Science lecture and demo
    - This event is a production of the Georgia Tech College of Sciences as part of their Frontiers in Science lecture series. - It is free and open to the public; RSVPs are not required to attend. - The lecture begins at 6:30 pm and will be followed by a virtual reality demo at 7:30. - Consult this campus map to locate the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons http://bit.ly/2CW96XO. - Parking options include the Area 2 deck on Ferst Drive and the Area 4 lot at State Street & Ferst Drive, both on this map http://bit.ly/2glBtWK (JPEG). Hourly rates apply. Non-Euclidean virtual reality - a Frontiers in Science lecture and demo Elisabeth Matsumoto, Assistant Professor School of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe. The ability of mass to curve space has fueled the imagination of many, but this is by far not the only instance of warped spaces being important for physics: The materials science of the very small scale -- the science of nanostructures and nanoengineering -- is one of them. Often these small spaces are very strongly curved, far from what mathematicians call "Euclidean." For example, two parallel lines may no longer only meet at infinity. These bizarre and exotic spaces have very unusual properties. Until recently, many of these complex spaces defied most people's imagination, but Virtual Reality technology is helping us immerse in them. Elisabetta Matsumoto will take us on a tour -- enabled by the latest in virtual-reality technology -- into the innate beauty and mystery of some spaces, such as the cross between a Euclidean straight line and Poincare's hyperbolic plane, which was made popular by Escher's artwork. Real-world applications or technological uses of these mathematical insights may seem to be light-years off, but don't worry, the real world will catch up with the imagination faster than we think. About The Speaker Elisabetta Matsumoto has been on a stellar career trajectory through some of the world’s finest physics departments, including Princeton and Harvard University, but she is not your typical physics geek. Her love of space and geometry has let her understand the complex structures of liquid crystals in unprecedented ways and predict the spontaneous formation of structures that spontaneously nano-engineer themselves from simple molecules. It has also led her to explore some of nature’s most intricate geometries for 3D printed jewelry and symmetry principles for knitted designs and fashion. Matsumoto holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania. She is building her soft matter research group at Georgia Tech. She has won several awards, including the Glenn Brown Prize by the International Society for Liquid Crystals. About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

    Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons, Room 152

    266 4th Street · Atlanta, GA

    4 comments
  • Does drinking water really make you smarter? - a Frontiers in Science lecture
    - This event is a production of the Georgia Tech College of Sciences as part of their Frontiers in Science lecture series. - It is free and open to the public; RSVPs are not required to attend. - Please refer to this webpage for detailed directions and information about parking https://b.gatech.edu/2MNrdm4. - Light refreshments will be served after the lecture. Does drinking water really make you smarter? - a Frontiers in Science lecture Mindy Millard-Stafford, Professor School of Biological Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Recent work from the lab of Mindy Millard-Stafford brings attention to the cognitive effects of dehydration. The findings have garnered immense media attention, from Newsweek and National Public to Men’s Health Magazine. Millard-Stafford discusses her Georgia Tech research leading up to this widely noticed work. In this Frontiers in Science lecture, Professor Millard-Stafford will discuss: Why is water essential? How much do we need? Is water the most hydrating beverage? Can you drink too much water? And based on one media headline -- Does dehydration make you dumber? She will also reflect on the unexpected media blitz: how it happened and what lessons we might take away from this experience. About the speaker A member of the Georgia Tech faculty for more than three decades, Mindy Millard-Stafford is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, where she directs the Exercise Physiology Laboratory. She is past president of the American College of Sports Medicine and member of the National Academy of Kinesiology. The goals of Professor Millard-Stafford's research are to seek nutritional and exercise interventions that can improve human health, well-being, and performance. Her lab is particularly focused on the importance of hydration to delay fatigue and maintain safety during exercise, especially in conditions of heat stress. About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

    Clary Theatre in the Bill Moore Student Success Center

    225 North Ave. NW · Atlanta, GA

    3 comments
  • Scientific advances with Darwin’s “most wonderful plants in the world”
    - This event is a production of the Atlanta Botanical Garden as part of their Science Cafe series. - Although the cafe itself is free, regular charges for Garden admission apply. - Seating is on a first-come basis; RSVPs are not required to attend. - This Science Cafe is held in conjunction with Cocktails in the Garden: come early, stay late to enjoy other things that the Garden has to offer. Aaron M. Ellison, Senior Research Fellow in Ecology Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Harvard University In this talk, Aaron Ellison lifts the curtain on the Little Shop of Horrors as he discusses new directions in basic and applied research with carnivorous plants. These once botanical oddities have now entered the biological mainstream as researchers use them to develop new biomaterials, discover new species with both classical tools and Facebook, and illustrate fundamental processes of plant evolutionary dynamics About the speaker Aaron M. Ellison is the Senior Research Fellow in Ecology in Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Senior Ecologist at the Harvard Forest, and a semi-professional photographer and writer. He studies the disintegration and reassembly of ecosystems—including the Sarracenia microecosystem—following natural and anthropogenic disturbances; thinks about the relationship between the Dao and the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis; reflects on the critical and reactionary stance of Ecology relative to Modernism, blogs as The Unbalanced Ecologist (https://unbalancedecologist.net/), and tweets as @AMaxEll17. He is the author of A Primer of Ecological Statistics (2004/2012), A Field Guide to the Ants of New England (2012; recipient of the 2013 USA Book News International Book Award in General Science, and the 2013 award for Specialty Title in Science and Nature from The New England Society in New York City), Stepping in the Same River Twice: Replication in Biological Research (2017), and Vanishing Point (2017; a collection of photographs and poetry from the Pacific Northwest), and most recently, co-edited (with Lubomír Adamec) Carnivorous Plants: Physiology, Ecology, and Evolution (2018). On weekends, he works wood.

    Atlanta Botanical Garden Mershon Hall

    1345 Piedmont Avenue NE · Atlanta, GA

  • When Will We Find E.T. and What Happens If We Do?
    - This event is a production of the Georgia Tech College of Sciences as part of their Frontiers in Science Lecture series. - It is free and open to the public. - RSVPs are not required to attend. - Consult this campus map to locate the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons http://bit.ly/2CW96XO. - Parking options include the Area 2 deck on Ferst Drive and the Area 4 lot at State Street & Ferst Drive, both on this map http://bit.ly/2glBtWK (JPEG). Hourly rates apply. __________ When Will We Find E.T. and What Happens If We Do? Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer SETI Institute Are we alone in the universe? The scientific hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence is now well into its fifth decade, and we still haven’t discovered any cosmic company. Could all this mean that finding biology beyond Earth, even if it exists, is a project for the ages – one that might take centuries or longer? (SETI = search for extraterrestrial intelligence.) New approaches and new technology for detecting sentient beings elsewhere suggest that there is good reason to expect that we could uncover evidence of sophisticated civilizations – the type of aliens we see in the movies and on TV – within a few decades. But why now, and what sort of evidence can we expect? And how will that affect humanity? Also, if we do find E.T., what would be the societal impact of learning that something, or someone, is out there? About the Speaker Seth Shostak claims to have developed an interest in extraterrestrial life at the tender age of 10, when he first picked up a book about the Solar System. This innocent beginning led to a degree in radio astronomy. Now as senior astronomer, Shostak is an enthusiastic participant in the SETI Institute’s observing programs. In addition, Shostak is keen on outreach activities: interesting the public – and especially young people – in science in general, and astrobiology in particular. He’s co-authored a college textbook on astrobiology and has written three trade books on SETI. In addition, he’s published more than 400 popular articles on science including regular contributions to NBC News MACH, gives many dozens of talks annually, and is the host of the SETI Institute’s weekly science radio show, “Big Picture Science.” About Frontiers in Science Lectures Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

    Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons, Room 152

    266 4th Street · Atlanta, GA

    7 comments
  • 100 years beyond the influenza pandemic of 1918: are we ready for the next one?
    - This event is a production of the Atlanta Science Tavern. - It is free and open to the public. - Seating is on a first-come basis. - RSVPs are not required to attend nor do they reserve seats. - Doors open at 6:00 pm for early arrival. - Gather for dinner by 7:00. - The evening's presentation gets under way around 7:45. __________ 100 years beyond the influenza pandemic of 1918: are we ready for the next one? Dr. Daniel Jernigan, Director of the Influenza Division National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Centers for Disease Control In 1918, a new influenza virus emerged causing a pandemic that killed an estimated 675,000 Americans and at least 50 million people worldwide. The flu pandemic of 1918 infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide—about one-third of the world’s population, causing the greatest influenza death total in recorded history. The vulnerability of healthy young adults and the lack of vaccines and treatments created an unprecedented public health crisis. The global engagement in World War I contributed to the transmission of virus through troop movement and crowding in military camps. Pandemic influenza illness was notable for the speed of disease, leading to high numbers of rapid onset pneumonia and death. Typically, seasonal influenza mortality is greatest among the youngest and oldest in a population. During the 1918 pandemic, the virus also affected young adults between 20 and 40 years of age. The average age of death was 28 years old. More troops died from pandemic influenza than from combat. The world has had three other pandemics in the last 100 years caused by influenza viruses having less severe illness. CDC monitors avian and swine influenza viruses that infect people and If a new pandemic virus were to emerge with characteristics like the 1918 virus, the impact of that pandemic could be devastating. Improvements and innovations in preparedness and response to pandemics have been made in recent years; however, further advances in vaccines, antivirals, and supportive healthcare are needed to fully mitigate the impact of severe, 1918-like pandemic About our Speaker Dr. Dan Jernigan is the Director of the Influenza Division at CDC, overseeing approximately 300 staff members who are responsible for global surveillance, prevention and control of seasonal, avian, swine, and pandemic influenza. Dr. Jernigan is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases epidemiology. He has served in leadership roles for various CDC emergency responses including anthrax, SARS, Hurricane Katrina, 2009 influenza H1N1, MERS, avian influenza H7N9, and Ebola.

    Manuel's Tavern

    602 N. Highland Ave NE · Atlanta, GA

    8 comments
  • Free screening: "Greenland, a Journey under the Ice" at the Carter Library
    - This event is organized by the Office for Science and Technology at the Embassy of France as part of France’s Make our Planet Great Again initiative. - It is free and open to the public. - Registration at the following Eventbrite link is *required* http://bit.ly/2L3dQgI. - Doors open for a reception and socializing at 6:00 pm. - The screening begins at 7:00 to be followed by a discussion and Q&A. Free screening: "Greenland, a Journey under the Ice" at the Carter Library You are cordially invited to a screening of the French documentary film "Greenland, a Journey Under the Ice" (with English subtitles) as part of the European Climate Diplomacy Week 2018 (September 10-14) being held in cities around the world. The film focuses on the increasingly rapid movement of the ice sheet that covers Greenland. As it separates and melts, the ice sheet is raising ocean levels and creating dire environmental consequences. A discussion and Q&A will follow with Dr. Ala Khazendar of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.

    Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum

    441 Freedom Parkway · Atlanta, GA

    5 comments
  • Falling in Love with Southeastern Grasslands - A Botanical Garden Fuqua Lecture
    - This event is a production the Atlanta Botanical Garden - Admission to the Garden is free for this Fuqua Lecture; no tickets or reservations required. - Early arrival is permitted, but, keep in mind, access to parts of the Garden may be limited. As a Georgia artist and nature lover who grew up in a region where there is enough rainfall to turn most any patch of dirt into a forest in only a few decades, falling in love with the wild beauty of grasslands has been a revelation for Philip Juras. Philip will present a visual tour of his landscape paintings that document his journey of grassland discovery. Although they are ecologically rich, aesthetically gorgeous, and often tightly linked to human history, grasslands, especially in the southeastern United States, have been largely lost and forgotten while the plant and animal species that depend on them have become increasingly rare. Through the coastal plain, high mountain balds, seaside meadows, and elsewhere, his work celebrates the rich aesthetic qualities of grasslands while also highlighting that these are threatened ecosystems deserving of our attention. _____ The Dorothy Chapman Fuqua Lecture is made possible by the generous support of the families of Edwina and Tom Johnson and Duvall and Rex Fuqua.

    Atlanta Botanical Garden

    1345 Piedmont Avenue Northeast · Atlanta, GA

    4 comments