• Biometrics and Our Privacy Future

    Univ-Baltimore School of Law

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  • Coding for Lawyers (and other folks): Python for Beginners

    Univ-Baltimore School of Law

    If you've been to our events lately, you've seen how a little data science or machine learning can help advance important issues. Take this opportunity to start building your own skill set. This interactive training will introduce legal and other non-tech professionals how to code in a programming language called Python. You will learn the basics of computer programming, the limitations of what software can do, and how to start writing your own programs. Python can be used to make web scrapers, Twitter bots, and document automators. Bring your Laptop! This is an interactive training where every attendee will be writing code, so bring a laptop to the event. This course is designed for beginners with no coding experience. The class will be taught by Matthew Stubenberg, an attorney and computer programmer who has developed numerous, successful legal technology projects.

  • Algorithmic Injustice: Bias in Machine Learning and Criminal Justice

    Univ-Baltimore School of Law

    Biases inherent in data can cause the behavior of machine learning algorithms to discriminate against certain populations. Machine learning algorithms are used every day by judges and other decision-makers in the criminal justice system to decide bail requirements, criminal sentencing, and parole recommendations. James Foulds, Assistant Professor of Information Systems at UMBC, has developed an approach to demonstrating the bias in current systems and presents a path forward to more equitable tools through application of his concept of “differential fairness.” Sonia Kumar, Senior Staff Attorney at the ACLU of Maryland, represents clients throughout the region who are challenged with confronting unjust outcomes based on the perceived “objectiveness” of predictive software. Please come out to participate with James and Sonia in a discussion about the legal and technical challenges of machine learning algorithms and potential solutions to what is a fundamental issue for the future of the criminal justice system.

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  • Structural Racism and Cannabis: A Big Data Story

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    Sometimes data just proves what you already know. Baltimore City's top prosecutor, Marilyn Mosby, recently declared that her office would no longer prosecute marijuana possession cases. Her statement comes on the heels of an investigative report in the Baltimore Fishbowl by Ethan McLeod, Andy Friedman, and Brandon Soderberg showing that, although overall cannabis-related arrests have decreased since cannabis decriminalization, data indicate the Baltimoreans still being arrested for cannabis remain almost entirely and disproportionately black. Come out to participate with Ethan, Andy, and Brandon in a discussion about their story, how it came together, and how data-driven journalism can affect public policy.

  • Open data & the battle for a better Baltimore Police Dept.

    University of Baltimore Thumel Business Center

    Data rules everything around me, but can it fix the Baltimore Police Department? Open Justice Baltimore joins us to answer this question. Their project BPD Watch aims to improve civilian oversight of the Baltimore City Police Department through information requests and crowdsourced data. They're using this information to build profiles of officers, to create much needed transparency. They will also present Case Harvester, an open source tool designed to mine the Maryland Judiciary Case Search. Open Justice Baltimore (OJB) develops open source data projects to increase transparency of the Baltimore Police Department and Baltimore City officials. OJB aims to work with community organizations, lawyers, journalists, educators, and researchers to create tools for the benefit of an educated and empowered public.

  • Constitutional Limits: How police & prosecutors can search your phone & jail you

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    The Fourth Amendment's limits on search and seizure are being tested by our cell phones, a device that knows almost everything about us. Join our panel of legal experts to learn when police can search your phone, use invasive new technology to find your phone and how prosecutors can use cell phone data in court. Speakers include: Thiru Vignarajah, a former prosecutor and an attorney, who has handled high profile cases, like the post-conviction appeal of Adnan Syed. Dan Kobrin, an attorney for the Maryland Public Defender's Office, who successfully created new rules against invasive police surveillance technology in Maryland. Lindsey Barrett, a staff attorney at Georgetown Law's Communications and Technology Clinic and privacy advocate. The panel will be moderated by Colin Starger, professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law. This event is in partnership with the Maryland Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section. Please register through our Eventbrite page. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/constitutional-limits-how-police-prosecutors-can-search-your-phone-put-you-in-jail-tickets-50396589556

  • Predicting the Supreme Court

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    The most imporant legal arguments in America end at the Supreme Court. Can technology combine with Big Data to predict who will win and lose? Join Colin Starger as he reviews the theory and practice of SCOTUS prediction. Professor Starger teaches Constitutional Law and Jurisprudence at the University of Baltimore. He is also the principal of the SCOTUS Mapping Project, an original software-driven research venture. The presentation is meant for anyone interested in the Supreme Court, a law degree is not required or expected. After Colin's presentation, we'll walk over to a nearby bar and continue the conversation.

  • Big Data and How to Use It

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    LOCATION HAS BEEN CHANGED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE LAW SCHOOL LOCATED AT 1401 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21201. Data is the oil of the 21st century. Understanding it and being able to make use of it is more important than ever. But what do you do if you have millions of rows of data or have data in two databases that need to be connected? Excel isn't going to be enough. Let us introduce you to SQL, a language to help wrangle Big Data by letting you interact with millions of rows of data across a number of databases. This training will go over the basics of writing SQL queries. We will be learning how to write these queries on case data extracted from Maryland Judiciary Case Search. This training is for beginners' no prior coding experience is necessary. The training is FREE and will be taught by Manny Turnbull, an attorney at the Peter Holland Law Firm, who has been using SQL to enhance his legal arguments and win class action lawsuits. So, come join us on July 2nd at University of Baltimore Law School, from 5:30 to 8:00, located at 1401 N Charles St, Baltimore, MD 21201. Make sure to bring your laptops so you can follow along with the lessons. Food will be provided. To register please click on the link below. https://goo.gl/forms/FuYd35wXJTzbW2EY2 This event is co-sponsored by Special Counsel Baltimore, Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service, and MSBA Young Lawyers Section.

  • Coding for Lawyers: Website Building

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    • What we'll do In the second installment of our Coding for Lawyers workshop, we will be learning how to create a website. You will learn the basics of what makes a website tick, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This is an interactive training for legal professionals (law students and paralegals are welcome). Everyone will be building their own website during the class as they follow along. This class is for absolute beginners to coding. No prior knowledge is needed and you did not have to come to the previous coding for lawyers class. PLEASE BRING YOUR LAPTOP SO YOU CAN FOLLOW ALONG. The class will be taught by Matthew Stubenberg, an attorney and computer programmer who has developed numerous, successful legal technology projects. The event is a partnership between Legal Hackers Baltimore and the Maryland Bar's Young Lawyers Section. • What to bring laptop • Important to know

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  • Log on, your honor: How the internet is changing access to justice in Maryland

    University of Baltimore School of Law

    In the U.S., 86 percent of middle and low income people that need civil legal assistance are not getting it, according to the Legal Services Corporation. Innovators in Maryland, however, are using the internet to democratize the law and improve access to legal services for our lower income neighbors. Join us for a panel discussion with experts from around Maryland that use technology to improve the legal system. These incredible individuals will share their experiences improving the Maryland court system, increasing understanding of local laws for self-represented litigants, and providing easier ways for low-income people to find an attorney. They will also discuss the challenges surrounding government planning of technology, inmate access of online resources, and what it takes to organize a legal community around a specific tool. Our panelists include: Pam Ortiz, Director, Access to Justice Department of the Maryland Courts Leland Sampson, Content Administrator, Maryland People's Law Library Joseph Mack, Executive Director, Civil Justice, Inc. The panel will last an hour, and afterwards we will grab drinks at Pen & Quill to continue the conversation.

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