What we're about

A Death Cafe Is a gathering of people, often strangers to eat cake, drink tea/coffee and discuss Death

Our objective is "to increase awareness of death with a view to help people make the most of their (finite) lives".

A Death Cafe is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counseling session.

Our Death Cafes are always offered:

On a not for profit basis

Held in an accessible, respectful and confidential space

With no intention of leading people to any conclusion, product or course of action,

💀 Death Cafes are a 'social franchise'. They have spread quickly across Europe, North America and Australasia. As of today, 4492 Death Cafes have been offered in 49 countries since September 2011. It is projected that If 10 people came to each one that would be 44920 participants. Death Cafe's have established that there are people who are keen to talk about death and that many are passionate enough to organize their own Death Cafe. Like what we are doing here. The Death Cafe model was developed by Jon Underwood and Sue Barsky Reid, based on the ideas of Bernard Crettaz. Please feel free to investigate these fine people for more information.

Death Cafe has no staff and are run on a voluntary basis by Jon Underwood in Hackney, East London. Also Litzy Miles who ran the first Death Cafe in the U.S. and Megan Monney, who runs the Death Cafe Facebook page have played a significant role in Death Cafe's development.

The continuation of these events are energized by the amazing quality of dialogue that occurs and the overwhelming interest received.

People often ask why we're doing this. Everyone has their own reasons for getting involved in Death Cafe. Let's us see who and why we have come this day.

Upcoming events (5+)

Bangor's Death Cafe

141 N Main St

Death Cafe Welcome to this open, confidential and respectful gathering; where we open up to our thoughts and discussions of death. Our intent is to provide an arena for all of us to explore the many elements of the topic death. We have no agenda, no political stance, no counseling focus and not profit making. As the Dalai Lama spoke “It is crucial to be mindful of death - to contemplate that you will not remain long in this life. If you are not aware of death, you will fail to take advantage of this special human life you have already attained". Additional information can be accessed through Susan Richardson,[masked]; [masked]. Acceptance, donations are welcome for supplies Openness to others views, plights and outlooks

Bangor's Death Cafe

141 N Main St

• What we'll do A Death Cafe Is a gathering of people, often strangers to eat cake, drink tea/coffee and discuss Death Our objective is "to increase awareness of death with a view to help people make the most of their (finite) lives". A Death Cafe is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counseling session. Our Death Cafes are always offered: On a not for profit basis Held in an accessible, respectful and confidential space With no intention of leading people to any conclusion, product or course of action, 💀 Death Cafes are a 'social franchise'. They have spread quickly across Europe, North America and Australasia. As of today, 4492 Death Cafes have been offered in 49 countries since September 2011. It is projected that If 10 people came to each one that would be 44920 participants. Death Cafe's have established that there are people who are keen to talk about death and that many are passionate enough to organize their own Death Cafe. Like what we are doing here. The Death Cafe model was developed by Jon Underwood and Sue Barsky Reid, based on the ideas of Bernard Crettaz. Please feel free to investigate these fine people for more information. Death Cafe has no staff and are run on a voluntary basis by Jon Underwood in Hackney, East London. Also Litzy Miles who ran the first Death Cafe in the U.S. and Megan Monney, who runs the Death Cafe Facebook page have played a significant role in Death Cafe's development. The continuation of these events are energized by the amazing quality of dialogue that occurs and the overwhelming interest received. People often ask why we're doing this. Everyone has their own reasons for getting involved in Death Cafe. Let's us see who and why we have come this day. • What to bring Be comfortable • Important to know

Bangor's Death Cafe

141 N Main St

• What we'll do A Death Cafe Is a gathering of people, often strangers to eat cake, drink tea/coffee and discuss Death Our objective is "to increase awareness of death with a view to help people make the most of their (finite) lives". A Death Cafe is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counseling session. Our Death Cafes are always offered: On a not for profit basis Held in an accessible, respectful and confidential space With no intention of leading people to any conclusion, product or course of action, 💀 Death Cafes are a 'social franchise'. They have spread quickly across Europe, North America and Australasia. As of today, 4492 Death Cafes have been offered in 49 countries since September 2011. It is projected that If 10 people came to each one that would be 44920 participants. Death Cafe's have established that there are people who are keen to talk about death and that many are passionate enough to organize their own Death Cafe. Like what we are doing here. The Death Cafe model was developed by Jon Underwood and Sue Barsky Reid, based on the ideas of Bernard Crettaz. Please feel free to investigate these fine people for more information. Death Cafe has no staff and are run on a voluntary basis by Jon Underwood in Hackney, East London. Also Litzy Miles who ran the first Death Cafe in the U.S. and Megan Monney, who runs the Death Cafe Facebook page have played a significant role in Death Cafe's development. The continuation of these events are energized by the amazing quality of dialogue that occurs and the overwhelming interest received. People often ask why we're doing this. Everyone has their own reasons for getting involved in Death Cafe. Let's us see who and why we have come this day. • What to bring Be comfortable • Important to know

Bangor's Death Cafe

141 N Main St

• What we'll do A Death Cafe Is a gathering of people, often strangers to eat cake, drink tea/coffee and discuss Death Our objective is "to increase awareness of death with a view to help people make the most of their (finite) lives". A Death Cafe is a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counseling session. Our Death Cafes are always offered: On a not for profit basis Held in an accessible, respectful and confidential space With no intention of leading people to any conclusion, product or course of action, 💀 Death Cafes are a 'social franchise'. They have spread quickly across Europe, North America and Australasia. As of today, 4492 Death Cafes have been offered in 49 countries since September 2011. It is projected that If 10 people came to each one that would be 44920 participants. Death Cafe's have established that there are people who are keen to talk about death and that many are passionate enough to organize their own Death Cafe. Like what we are doing here. The Death Cafe model was developed by Jon Underwood and Sue Barsky Reid, based on the ideas of Bernard Crettaz. Please feel free to investigate these fine people for more information. Death Cafe has no staff and are run on a voluntary basis by Jon Underwood in Hackney, East London. Also Litzy Miles who ran the first Death Cafe in the U.S. and Megan Monney, who runs the Death Cafe Facebook page have played a significant role in Death Cafe's development. The continuation of these events are energized by the amazing quality of dialogue that occurs and the overwhelming interest received. People often ask why we're doing this. Everyone has their own reasons for getting involved in Death Cafe. Let's us see who and why we have come this day. • What to bring Be comfortable • Important to know

Past events (24)

Bangor's Death Cafe

141 N Main St

Photos (3)