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Bay Area Adventure- Hiking, Kayaking, Social Events & More! Message Board › Some info for the Photographic Hike

Some info for the Photographic Hike

Chas
Here's some prep info on depth of field.

If you are familiar w/ this concept (even just a little) and know how to adjust the aperture on your camera, it will really help your learning curve on the hike.

Chas

 

 

 

 

CONTROLLING DEPTH OF FIELD

Although print size and viewing distance influence how large the circle of confusion appears to our eyes, aperture and focal distance are the two main factors that determine how big the circle of confusion will be on your camera's sensor. Larger apertures (smaller F-stop number) and closer focusing distances produce a shallower depth of field. The following test maintains the same focus distance, but changes the aperture setting:

f/8.0 f/5.6 f/2.8

note: images taken with a 200 mm lens (320 mm field of view on a 35 mm camera)
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