What we're about

This group is for anyone interested in Spiritualism or other associated fields. The Centre is for anyone seeking information, practical experience, development groups or Church Services.

Upcoming events (5+)

A evening of Trance and Channeling

Community Centre

A Development night for Trance facilitated by Rev. Louise Robson. Trance mediumship as described in Wikipedia "Trance mediumship" is often seen as a form of mental mediumship. Most trance mediums remain conscious during a communication period, wherein a spirit uses the medium's mind to communicate. The spirit or spirits using the medium's mind influences the mind with the thoughts being conveyed. The medium allows the ego to step aside for the message to be delivered. At the same time, one has awareness of the thoughts coming through and may even influence the message with one's own bias. Such a trance is not to be confused with sleepwalking, as the patterns are entirely different. Castillo (1995) states, Trance phenomena result from the behavior of intense focusing of attention, which is the key psychological mechanism of trance induction. Adaptive responses, including institutionalized forms of trance, are 'tuned' into neural networks in the brain.[21] In the 1860s and 1870s, trance mediums were very popular. Spiritualism generally attracted female adherents, many who had strong interests in social justice. Many trance mediums delivered passionate speeches on abolitionism, temperance, and women's suffrage.[22] Scholars have described Leonora Piper as one of the most famous trance mediums in the history of Spiritualism.[5][23][24] In the typical deep trance, the medium may not have clear recall of all the messages conveyed while in an altered state; such people generally work with an assistant. That person selectively wrote down or otherwise recorded the medium's words. Rarely did the assistant record the responding words of the sitter and other attendants. An example of this kind of relationship can be found in the early 20th century collaboration between the trance medium Mrs. Cecil M. Cook of the William T. Stead Memorial Center in Chicago (a religious body incorporated under the statutes of the State of Illinois) and the journalist Lloyd Kenyon Jones. The latter was a non-medium Spiritualist who transcribed Cook's messages in shorthand. He edited them for publication in book and pamphlet form.[25]

Cupper's and Chat.

CAFE EDGE

Every Thursday morning members meet and chat at "The Edge" in Beenleigh.

A Sunday morning Spiritualist Church Service

Beenleigh Neighbour Centre

Welcome to our first Service of the year 10:00 am on Sunday at The Community Centre Mansfield Walk Beenleigh ( just near the Library and the Police Station ) The Service involves modern and uplifting songs an inspiring talk by our guest medium, a healing meditation, a demonstration of mediumship or psychic reading and usually finishes about 12;30. We serve Tea & Coffee, share a plate of food This is the place to meet and talk to like minded people about Spirituality, paranormal or psychic phenomena. Some of us even talk about life, football or TV. Stay around after the service for a cuppa and a chat to meet and mix with like minded people. Why not bring a friend and join us for a great morning. Regards Bob[masked]

A evening of Trance and Channeling

Beenleigh Neighbour Centre

A Development night for Trance facilitated by Rev. Bob Colquhoun Trance mediumship as described in Wikipedia "Trance mediumship" is often seen as a form of mental mediumship. Most trance mediums remain conscious during a communication period, wherein a spirit uses the medium's mind to communicate. The spirit or spirits using the medium's mind influences the mind with the thoughts being conveyed. The medium allows the ego to step aside for the message to be delivered. At the same time, one has awareness of the thoughts coming through and may even influence the message with one's own bias. Such a trance is not to be confused with sleepwalking, as the patterns are entirely different. Castillo (1995) states, Trance phenomena result from the behavior of intense focusing of attention, which is the key psychological mechanism of trance induction. Adaptive responses, including institutionalized forms of trance, are 'tuned' into neural networks in the brain.[21] In the 1860s and 1870s, trance mediums were very popular. Spiritualism generally attracted female adherents, many who had strong interests in social justice. Many trance mediums delivered passionate speeches on abolitionism, temperance, and women's suffrage.[22] Scholars have described Leonora Piper as one of the most famous trance mediums in the history of Spiritualism.[5][23][24] In the typical deep trance, the medium may not have clear recall of all the messages conveyed while in an altered state; such people generally work with an assistant. That person selectively wrote down or otherwise recorded the medium's words. Rarely did the assistant record the responding words of the sitter and other attendants. An example of this kind of relationship can be found in the early 20th century collaboration between the trance medium Mrs. Cecil M. Cook of the William T. Stead Memorial Center in Chicago (a religious body incorporated under the statutes of the State of Illinois) and the journalist Lloyd Kenyon Jones. The latter was a non-medium Spiritualist who transcribed Cook's messages in shorthand. He edited them for publication in book and pamphlet form.[25]

Past events (477)

A Sunday morning Spiritualist Church Service

Beenleigh Neighbour Centre

Photos (25)