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BorgFest Meetup Group Message Board › 2/18 Healthtech panel followup

2/18 Healthtech panel followup

Rich
borgfest
Group Organizer
Austin, TX
Post #: 26
Thanks so much to everyone who showed up to represent. I'm blown away by how many members of the audience and panel self-identified as cyborgs now or sometime during their lifespan--well over half! That bodes well for a cyborg festival. I'm sharing with you the moderator's questions that were shared with us in advance. Due to time, we did not get into all of them, but if there's one or more you'd like me to address, please let me know. Also, there was a surprise late addition to the panel, Dr. Mini Kahlon, the Vice Dean for Partnerships and Relationships for the UT Dell Medical School. I'm really glad she was there and very much enjoyed her perspective.

Moderation Guide
Wearable Patient Data and Technology Adoption
In early 2013, the Pew Foundation’s “Tracking for Health” study found that 69 percent of Americans track some form of health-related information and 21 percent of them use some form of digital device to do so. In fact there is now a social trend of participating in online communities devoted to sharing health and disease experience. This trend, called “biosociality” by researchers, includes self-tracking data and sharing this information amongst participants. There are companies, such as SmallStepsLab, that serve as an intermediary between data-rich companies, in this case Fitbit, and academic researchers. The Health Data Exploration Project, a study conducted by the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology and supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, suggested this type of partnership foreshadows a much larger set of activities with the potential to transform how research is conducted in medicine, public health, and the social and behavioral sciences. (Source)
Currently, consumers are collecting a lot of data. Many consumers are wearing watches while others collect data through more intrusive methods such as insulin pods. There are a lot of questions around the data wearables are currently collecting, and even more around what they could collect in the future.
• It is clear there is an immediate benefit of self-tracking data as it can provide better measures of everyday behavior and lifestyle, filling the gaps in more traditional clinical data collection and presenting a more complete picture of health (Source). But how do we know if we can we trust the data? According to Blum, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco, “We can't make the leap that just because the data from these low-risk devices is coming in digitally doesn't mean that it's accurate." He says validation studies are needed. Who does this validation fall on? Academia? Doctors? Wearable companies?
o Question aimed towards: Mini Kahlon, Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani
• Say we do trust the accuracy of the data, we now have a new data input. Traditionally inputs have been lab results or direct interaction with a patient, but now a third input of passively collected data exists. How does this third touchpoint change the doctor and patient interaction?
o Question aimed towards: Mini Kahlon, Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani
• According to Statista, wearable technology (including watches, google glass type techonologies, and medical technologies) currently have a 5,000-7,000 million dollar market. However this number will grow to over 12,500 million dollars in 2018. How can the health care system utilize this data?
o Question aimed towards: Mini Kahlon, Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani
• Obama is promoting precision medicine, which is interchangeably referred to as “personalized medicine.” Precision medicine refers to the concept of discovering treatments that target the underlying cause of disease. It includes sequencing the genes of a cancer patient’s tumor to help doctors choose a tailored drug to fight it, and discovering the root causes of other diseases (Source). It stands to reason that all of this passively collected data starts to allow for more precision medicine but how does this affect care? How does this change the conversation between a doctor and patient?
o Question aimed toward: Mini Kahlon, Pär Axelsson (how does this change the conversation with his provider)
Broadly speaking, both medical and consumer wearables aim to fill gaps in human capacity. While medical devices fill gaps created by disability or illness, consumer wearables fill gaps created by being human. For example, evolution hasn’t given us brain wi-fi, yet. Both kinds of wearables need to justify being attached to our bodies and both need to embed themselves seamlessly into our experiences. If a wearable obstructs your experience of the real world, or is a distraction, it’s likely to end up on a shelf instead of your wrist. That’s not to say that they don’t take getting used to as I’m sure Pär took some time getting used to a glucose meter being attached to his skin. But after a period, a well-made wearable should seem like a seamless extension of our bodies (Source).
• How do wearables currently fit into our every day experiences? (How does wearing them change the way we go about our day and what could this mean for future adoption? What are the biggest challenges with adoption?)
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani, Pär Axelsson
• If consumers and patients are willing to wear these devices, one has to assume they would like some added benefit in return. So we must ask how does collecting this data benefit the patients who provide it? Does the data from wearables influence their health or their behaviors in any way?
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani, Pär Axelsson

Rich
borgfest
Group Organizer
Austin, TX
Post #: 27
(cont'd)

Futuristic Technology
What happens when we take wearables one step further. What happens when we move away from something as mundane as a watch and begin to examine something more ‘futuristic feeling’? Futurist Ray Kurzweil believes that the 21st century will achieve 1,000 times the progress of the 20th century (source). This means we will be introduced to new health care technology that could change the field of healthcare and could change the way humans see themselves.
For years we have seen technology used to help amputees and soldiers but as technology evolves, we are seeing more and more uses for it to improve the human body. We can already see technology changing the human body through the concept of cyborgs and transhumanism. Cyborgs are anyone who undergoes (has?) human augmentation, performance enhancement, body modification, or uses wearable technology.
• With constantly evolving technology, where does the human end and technology come into play?
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani, Richard MacKinnon
• We also need to think about the potential ethical considerations with transhumanism. The concept of the genetic divide speaks to the disproportionate availabilities of human enhancement technologies. This could create a two-tiered society of genetically engineered “haves” and “have nots” if social democaratic reforms lag behind implementation of enhancement technologies. (Source). How do we deal with this potentially hard to navigate ethical dilemma?
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani, Richard MacKinnon
• At what point will prosthetic capabilities exceed those of the human parts they replace? And what are the ethical ramifications arising from augmentations providing advantages to the recipient?
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein, Kyle Samani, Richard MacKinnon

One current example of a futuristic technology that could start to change the health care sphere Google Glass.
While Google is still working on Google Glass, the Google Glass Explorer program has come to an end and Google will no longer be selling Glass to early adopters willing to pay $1500 dollars. Instead, Glass is going back to the lab until it is ‘ready’. When the Google Glass Explorer program first started, Mr. Brin, Google’s cofounder and the man in charge of Google Glass, knew the product wasn’t finished and that it needed work, but he wanted that to take place in public, not in the top-secret Google lab.
• When it comes to Google Glass, the first question is how can technology like Google Glass change our behaviors, especially our health behaviors? And with the end of the Explorer project, what does that mean for the potentially positive influence Google Glass is having / could have on health technology?
o Question aimed towards: Robin Krieglstein. Kyle Samani, Rickhard MacKinnon

Conclusion
So with all this being said, we want to end with one final question:
• What future technology are you most excited about? What is that scenario/story?
o Question aimed towards: All
Rich
borgfest
Group Organizer
Austin, TX
Post #: 28
Also, the hashtag for the event was #ourhealthfuture
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