What we're about

This group is for anyone interested in Jungian psychology, in learning about concepts such as the shadow, collective unconscious, archetypes, dream work, the transcendent function, and other ideas that C. G. Jung explored.

Upcoming events (3)

Jungian Sandplay: The Importance of Being and Silence in Child Analysis

C. G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles

Presented Maria Ellen Chiaia, Ph.D. $90 pre-registered / $95 at-door Drawing from clinical and theoretical material, we will focus on the importance of being and the role of silence in analytic work with children. As the child tells his or her story through play and interaction with the therapist, we in turn imagine and empathize with the child in their world and in the wordless spaces between us. This capacity to be with the child’s emotional experience without verbal interpretation, allows children the freedom to express their thoughts and feelings without impingement, so that a liminal space may be created for healing and transformation. Course Objectives: * Describe what is meant by the term liminal space and its importance in child analytic practice. * Describe the role of silence in analytic work with children from a theoretical perspective. * Describe the role of silence in analytic work with children from a clinical perspective. * Give an example of how premature interpretation can interfere with a child’s symbolic play. * Give an example of how the analyst’s countertransference can affect his/her capacity to hold the silence in analytic child psychotherapy. Maria Chiaia, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Berkeley and Marin and works with adults, children and adolescents. She is a teaching member of the International Society for Sandplay Therapy and has lectured and taught internationally and at many universities and institutes. She is co-author of Sandplay in Three Voices: Images, Relationship, the Numinous and has authored many articles and book chapters.

Living Life More Fully in the Shadow of Mortality

Presented James Hollis, Ph.D. $40 pre-registered / $45 at-door Jung observed that “life is a short pause between two mysteries.” That fact is not in debate; what does matter, then, is how we live that short pause. Given that mortality frames our brief journey, our focus will be on the attitudes and practices which enable us to live more fully, particularly when dealing with issues such as depression, anxiety, trauma, grief, loss, and physical illness. We will examine the role of psychological maturation as a way of making meaning of our lives. Learning Objectives: * Describe the role of attitude when dealing with physical illness, depression, and anxiety * Give an example of psychological practices which are beneficial to patients dealing with physical illness, depression, and anxiety James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is also the author of fifteen books including his most recent book, Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey.

Taking Your Life Back: Steps to the Recovery of a Personal Journey

Presented James Hollis, Ph.D. $60 pre-registered / $65 at-door Tiny, dependent, and at the mercy of the world around us, we all have to adapt, adjust, bury, deny, split-off and repress, and thereby lose contact with our own sovereignty and natural source of guidance. The core focus of the second half of life, is the recovery of that source. In this workshop we will focus on the steps that can help us to identify the affects,, attitudes, and belief systems that can interfere both in our relationships with others, as well as towards ourselves, thus leading to a greater sense of integration of the parts of the personality we have sought to mute. Learning Objectives: * Describe how the defenses of denial, splitting, and repression contribute to a weakened ego and sense of self * Give an example of how the dismantling of a defensive structure can contribute towards a sense of integration * Give an example of a maladaptive defensive structure * Describe what is meant by an overly adaptive personality structure and why this defense often stops functioning in mid-life James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Washington, D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is also the author of fifteen books including his most recent book, Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey.

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