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  • CAS-GJ Book Club - Pueblo, Hardscrabble, Greenhorn: Society on the High Plains

    *Please note - attendees are strongly encouraged to wear face masks and social distancing will be practiced Meet with the CAS-GJ Book Club on July 22 to discuss "Pueblo, Hardscrabble, Greenhorn: Society on the High Plains,[masked]" by Janet Lecompte. Below is a review of the book. Pueblo, Hardscrabble, and Greenhorn were among the very first white settlements in Colorado. In their time they were the most westerly settlements in American territory, and they attracted a lively and varied population of mavericks from more civilized parts of the world-from what became New Mexico to the south and from as far east as England. The inhabitants of these little walled towns thrived on the rigor and freedom of frontier life. Many were ex-trappers full already of frontier expertise. Others were enthusiastic neophytes happy to escape problems back home. They sought Mexican wives in Taos or Santa Fe or allied themselves with the native Indian tribes, or both. The fur trade and the illegal liquor trade with the Indians were at first the mainstays of their economy. As time went on they extended their activities to farming illegally on the land owned by the Indians and trading their crops and other trade articles. They enjoyed themselves hunting, gambling, trading, and with their women, freely mixing Spanish, Indian, and Anglo-American cultures in a community without laws or bigotry. This idyll was brought to a close by the Mexican War and the lure of the California Gold Rush of 1849. The expectation of a railroad on the Arkansas brought many of the settlers back, only to be scared away again by the massacre of Pueblo by the Utes in 1854 of which Mrs. Lecompte has reconstructed a very complete record. When the gold seekers rushed to Pikes Peak in 1858 and stayed to establish farms and towns, some of the pioneers of the early days returned with them, and shared their skills and knowledge to make possible the permanent settlements that resulted. During our meeting on August 19, we will be discussing Southern Ute Women by Katherine Osburn (previously scheduled for March 18) *************** If you're thinking to yourself, "I'd like to attend but I'm not sure if I can read the book by the time we meet", don't worry. Everyone is welcome regardless of how much you have read. At the book club meeting we will also discuss future books for the reading list. You need not be a paid member of CAS-GJ to attend the Book Club. We'll see you then!

  • Film viewing: “Languages of Landscape: Cedar Mesa Perishables Project.”

    From the Four Corners Lecture Series: On Thursday, July 23, at 4:00 p.m. MDT, will show the film “Languages of the Landscape: The Cedar Mesa Perishables Project.” Registration: https://bit.ly/2BFV7sZ. https://4454pp.blackbaudhosting.com/4454pp/FCLS-Cedar-Mesa-Perishables-Project?fbclid=IwAR2BJ1tEaWPbSuQWMlCJiy44QEp3zcMqw0gVklKS_wNeSASGAlWY5qtUdbg

  • CAS-GJ Book Club - Southern Ute Women by Kaherine Osburn

    Out West Books

    Meet with the CAS-GJ Book Club to discuss "Water Mysteries of Mesa Verde" by Kenneth Wright. It will be a great chance to read about archaeology, anthropology, history - and then have a chance to discuss what we learned. This meeting will take place at the Out West Books in Grand Junction. **please note that this event had previously been scheduled for March 15 Below are reviews of the book. “[Southern Ute Women] makes a useful contribution to the growing body of scholarship on Native American women.”—Sara H. Hill, American Historical Review (Sara H. Hill American Historical Review[masked]) “Historians of American Indians have devoted insufficient attention to the distinctive experiences of Native American women, although in recent years a number of scholars have made strides in reversing that trend. With Southern Ute Women, Katherine Osburn helps redress this gap in the historiography. . . . A thoughtful, incisive, and well-written monograph that does much to further our understanding of the dynamic lives of Native American women in the allotment era.”— Steve Amerman, Western Historical Quarterly (Steve Amerman Western Historical Quarterly[masked]) “A well-researched, clearly written account that adds to our understanding of the power dynamic between a dominating federal government and a subordinate, but not completely coerced, reservation population.”— Sherry L. Smith, Agricultural History (Sherry L. Smith Agricultural History[masked]) *************** If you're thinking to yourself, "I'd like to attend but I'm not sure if I can read the book by the time we meet", don't worry. Everyone is welcome regardless of how much you have read. At the book club meeting we will also discuss future books for the reading list. You need not be a paid member of CAS-GJ to attend the Book Club. We'll see you then!