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Climate change: historians will look back and ask 'why didn't they act?' | Environment | theguardian.com

From: Doug K.
Sent on: Saturday, June 14, 2014 7:01 AM
“The book starts from a position of complete factualness, then imagines what might unfold. We’re not expecting all this to happen. We’re saying this is what a worst-case scenario could look like,” Oreskes tells me. It’s not a pretty picture. By the end of the book, co-written with fellow historian Eric Conway, the Netherlands and Bangladesh are submerged, Australia and Africa are depopulated, and billions have perished in fires, floods, wars and pandemics. “A second dark age had fallen on Western civilisation,” Oreskes writes, “in which denial and self-deception, rooted in an ideological fixation on ‘free’ markets, disabled the world’s powerful nations in the face of tragedy.”
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jun/13/climate-change-historians-will-look-back-and-ask-why-didnt-they-act

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