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Re: [JSNinjas] Re: Thanks

From: Adam C.
Sent on: Monday, August 9, 2010 3:32 PM
Ya, she's definitely a cool person. I met her in DC at JSConf (she wasn't quite so preoccupied as she was at TXJS). I like her post. I think in a lot of ways, it is a direct validation so to speak of what I wrote you earlier. Though I don't know Rebecca's background, she seems like many JavaScript developers to be maturing in her abilities only to wake up and realize she has entered into the realm of engineering through the back door.

As time goes on, engineer's like myself will continue to enter into JavaScript and provide their perspective to individuals who in the past might not have been aware of such concepts as modularity, decoupling, or pure functions, etc...

I couldn't help but but comment too on her post, =):

"To wax poetic, as JavaScript engineers we are visionaries who realize the potential of the materials we work with, see where others have gone, and seek to go further. Classically trained or not, realizing these goals will require technique and discipline greater than that of those before us, but we also have their success and failures to learn and start from.

Additionally, the excellence of jQuery as a tool, like any tool, provides no commentary on the design and architecture of its creations. Hammers may or may not have been necessary to build the Eiffel Tower, but it is in the realm of the engineer to realize these limitations. As engineers, we will envision creations beyond the capabilities of the tools available to us. If necessary, we must create these tools to realize our dreams."


On Mon, Aug 9, 2010 at 12:37 PM, Matt Shannon <[address removed]> wrote:
Here's a blog post from earlier today from Rebecca Murphey in the context of jQuery. The content may not be as concise as Zakas' presentation.

http://rmurphey.posterous.com/on-jquery-large-applications

I'm a big follower of her work -- she ran TXJS this summer, and is a member of the yayQuery podcast. She also has quite a few samples on GitHub of interesting javascript design.

Matt

On Mon, Aug 9, 2010 at 3:21 AM, Adam Crabtree <[address removed]> wrote:
Hey Matt,

Here's a video covering a lot of what I mentioned about overall software best practices and their special and unique relationship to the dynamic nature of JavaScript:

From Nicholas Zakas of Yahoo / YUI:



Cheers,
Adam

On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 1:04 PM, Adam Crabtree <[address removed]> wrote:
Hey Matt,

I have a couple thoughts on large JS app code organization. 1st, that I've been apart of several and people seem to do a horrible job at it. =) 2nd, there appears to be a disconnect in JavaScript as compared to other programming language with regards to layers. I think the concept of a JavaScript BLO (Business Layer Object), DAO, and Presentation Layer (Object or not) is something that quite frankly does not exist within the mind of most JavaScript developers. The ramifications of this are obvious; data storage, business logic and DOM interaction logic are all muddled together making decoupling into appropriately organized layers extremely difficult. Further complicating this is the additionally tendency to create highly coupled JS/CSS/HTML code to the extent that much JavaScript is organized within the scope of its respective HTML and not with respect to its logic or functionality.

In summary, the JavaScript community suffers from a lack of software engineers and an abundance of hobbyist and web designers. This isn't all bad as it is this unencumbered lack of industry opinion on the "right" way to do things that lends so much freedom innovation. However, that being said, there are many "right" ways to do things that are just that b/c they are proven to work well, like what I stated above. However again though, as I wrote about BLOs and DAOs in JavaScript I felt myself cringing at this reliance upon paradigms rather than embracing the full potential that an unencumbered scripting language like JavaScript holds. I'd like it to the move from theatre to motion pictures. Nothing prevented a one-to-one relationship and transposition, but time soon proved a much greater potential in the latter.

Hope this provides you with some of your?decisions. I prefer require.js. Additionally I'm thinking I might include a 15 discussion time before the "talk" to provide group perspective on issues like these, which are inherently too minimal to spend a full meetup on, yet important enough that they should be discussed.

Cheers,
Adam

On Wed, Aug 4, 2010 at 9:36 PM, Matt Shannon <[address removed]> wrote:
Hi Adam,

Thank you for organizing the meetup this evening.

I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts on code organization in large javascript applications.?Alexis (friend/coworker) and I have been digging into require.js, closure's namespaces, John Resig's namespace implementation, etc. Maybe it is something we can discuss next week at the hack night.

Matt



--
Better a little with righteousness
? ? ?? than much gain with injustice.
Proverbs 16:8




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Better a little with righteousness
? ? ?? than much gain with injustice.
Proverbs 16:8




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--
Better a little with righteousness
? ? ?? than much gain with injustice.
Proverbs 16:8

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