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Re: [DallasYiJing] Change and Impermanence, and the poem ?The Dakini Speaks?

From: Shawn
Sent on: Thursday, August 25, 2011 4:52 AM
Thanks Craig for posting this.

This poem and dhamma talk on impermanence has made a strong, nearly visceral impression on me. This line resonated deeply:

"Impermanence is life's only promise to us and she keeps it with ruthless impeccability."

In Buddhism, it is said that most all suffering is caused by "wanting things to be other than they are." On a personal level I reflect and I see that most of my suffering occurs when I grow dissatisfied with what has arisen or when I wish to cling to / make permanent some pleasing (to me) arrangement of conditions which has arisen. Either reaction, of course, is an unnecessary and painful denial of impermanence. The good news is that this suffering is optional, something we voluntarily do (with or without being cognizant of our "choice")

When Spring speaks of "Hello, Good Bye" and "this too shall pass," I am filled with compassion. Compassion (for myself and for others) for the suffering rooted in the denial of impermanence. 

What is the relationship between change and impermanence?

Are they not simply two different perspectives pointing to the same truth? 

From the Buddhist perspective: If all is impermanent, then change is implied. 

From the Taoist: If changes are cyclical and forever occurring then things are impermanent by definition. 

It is interesting how in the I Ching there seems a curious lack of emphasis or even discussion of the suffering that will occur when one would deny that change is a constant. Perhaps, for the authors, this was a "given," a truth so simple and so obvious as to not merit mentioning? But my knowledge of the I Ching is limited. But this would make for an interesting conversation (perhaps after we finish 61?) - to discuss the differences between how a Taoist views change and how a Buddhist might view impermanence (and the voluntary suffering from the denial of same)

All Good Things,
Shawn Ingram
[address removed]

On Aug 25, 2011, at 1:32 AM, Candace <[address removed]> wrote:

Thank you Craig for this poem and the talk on impermanence.  Spring stated in her talk that by clinging to our expectations, life becomes a prison, so "let's dance the wild dance of no hope" and give ourselves to the present moment.  
 
Her statements about impermanence brought to mind the five remembrances of the buddha regarding human nature (which were taught to me by a zen buddhist monk, and I am paraphrasing in my own words): 
 
1.  remember that we all get sick
2.  remember that we all grow old
3.  remember that we all die
4.  remember that we are all responsible for our own actions (karma)
5.  remember that everything we love will one day be taken away from us
 
"Hello, Goodbye"
 
Candace :)


From: Craig Anthony Leger <[address removed]>
To: [address removed]
Sent: Wed, August 24,[masked]:51:53 PM
Subject: [DallasYiJing] Change and Impermanence, and the poem “The Dakini Speaks”

What is the relationship between change and impermanence?
 
We are studying the Classic of Changes. Is there any connection between Daoist understanding of change, and the Buddhist teaching about impermanence?
 
I have been listening to this talk by Spring Washam these last couple of weeks on impermanence and change.  (I have probably listened to it three or four times by now.) Spring Washam begins with a poem by Joyce Wellwood called “The Dakini Speaks”
 
Spring Washam is funny, and light-hearted, even though she is talking about impermanence, a subject that most people treat with undue grimness. She talks about how everything in life is always changing, and why that can help us to see how beautiful and precious life is.
 
You can see a brief bio of Spring Washam here:
 
You can listen to Spring Washam’s talk in streaming audio with this link: http://www.audiodharma.org/talks/audio_player/2525.html
 
 
I am eager to hear your comments on the poem and on the talk by Spring Washam.
 
Also, don’t forget about our meeting this Saturday:
 
Craig
 




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Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
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