• Workday Wordsmiths

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers

    Workday Wordsmiths offers several of the Guild’s more popular activities (Feedback, Brainstorming & Learning) in a relaxed, daytime setting. During these sessions writers will have the option of sharing a fifteen to twenty minute reading with the group for constructive feedback, such as a short story, chapter from a manuscript, or an essay. In lieu of a reading, writers will also have the option of sharing story ideas for a brainstorming session with the group. One third of the meeting will also be devoted to discussion about a specific book on the art of writing. Members will take turns leading these discussions, depending upon whatever writing guide, manual, or workbook they are interested in at the time.

  • Writers Round Robin

    Canterbury High School

    Want to bring your writing to the next level? Want to refine your skills and learn from the invaluable insights of your fellow scribes in an affable, supportive environment? Writers Round Robin is the place where all of that happens. At each meeting you’ll engage in animated discussion about diverse writing topics, hear vivid readings from two of our Guild members, and benefit from the perceptive feedback our members give each reader. At Round Robin meetings we maintain a queue of Guild Writers who would like to read a fifteen to twenty minute segment of a project he or she is working on, e.g. a short story, a chapter or scene from a novel, a scene from a stage or screenplay, a poem or essay, you get the idea. We encourage Writers from all skill levels, novice to published professional, and all genres. After each reading, the other Guild Writers attending the meeting will, in succession, offer their feedback, constructive criticism, and suggestions for improvement for approximately twenty minutes. Our goal is to be candid and frank with our reviews, specific with our advice for changes, but supportive and heartening of each writer’s efforts. Readings are strictly voluntary. No one is required to share his or her work in order to participate in Writers Round Robin meetings. No one is even required to give feedback, for that matter. It is perfectly acceptable for Guild Members to simply listen to the readings and the commentary. Writers who are sharing their work are encouraged, but not required, to provide hard copies for other members at the meeting to follow along and offer written comments and editing suggestions. If you have never been to a writer’s group where authors share and critique one another’s work, please keep in mind a few guidelines. (1) Not everyone is going to write in your genre. Quite a few of the submissions will represent books, short stories or articles that you would never have any interest in reading outside of the group. You will hear and read all skill levels of creative writing. Be patient with your fellow authors. We are here to support one another, not to showboat or tear one another down. Everyone’s writing evolves the more they keep at the craft. (2) When offering your comments, it’s a great idea to start off by telling the author what you liked about their reading. It could be something as simple as a particular verb, adjective or metaphor that popped off the page. Then go into your suggestions about what the author might consider changing. Some people favor the “sandwich” rule of critiquing. Start and end with positive comments, with the constructive, but negative feedback sandwiched in the middle. (3) When it comes to the negative, try not tell the author absolutely everything you think they should change about their work. Take notes and focus on the larger issues, or the comments that other members have not already mentioned. If all else fails, focus on the grammar. (4) It helps to be specific with your comments. For example, if the writer uses too many redundant adjectives or modifiers, suggest which ones you would cut or, even better, a distinct noun that makes the use of modifiers unnecessary. (5) If it is your turn to read for the first time, please do not be discouraged. Any writer who does not develop a thick skin will have a difficult time enjoying this profession. Keep writing, and above all, keep coming back to the meetings and sharing.

  • Pubs & Prose Night - Come carouse with trailblazing local writers & talk shop

    Have you ever dared to imagine how magnificent it would be to converse, rap, discourse with your fellow scribes and authors (both published and aspiring) within the convivial surroundings of a local pub? One with a mind-blowing selection of craft brews to spark the imagination and satisfy the artistic palate? Papa Hemingway described the artists’ community in Paris in the 1920’s as a “moveable feast,” a nightly gathering of the most talented writers, painters, sculptors, and composers of their time, that moved from bar to bar throughout the City of Lights. FWWG's Pubs & Prose Night is a 21st Century revival of the Moveable Feast here in Fort Wayne amongst the writing community. Minus the tuberculosis and absinthe, of course. Luckily we happen to have a city teeming with talented, hops and barley-loving storytellers to fit the bill. Monday nights at JK O’Donnell’s (121 W Wayne St.) affords the perfect environment for the Fort Wayne Writers Guild to continue our noble discourse on the fine art of writing in a setting as gregarious as the fellowship our Guild has engendered. The second Monday of the month is also the ONLY night when JK's offers Live Traditional Irish Music. Enough blarney and brogue to break even the worst writers block. We promise. No readings, just a group of fascinating local writers talking shop, talking smack, and sometimes expounding on life's great pageantry over a few excellent brews. Or not. It’s a bar, so everything’s naturally going to be less structured. That’s the idea. If you're not a drinker, don't worry. Plenty of our members have an amazing time filled with laughter and animated discussion while sipping on nothing but root beer and ice water. Camaraderie is the point of the gathering. Beer is just a tasty but, ultimately, unnecessary facilitator of that goal. I encourage all Guild Writers to consider attending this event, ESPECIALLY NEW MEMBERS who haven’t attended a Guild meeting yet. Pubs & Prose is VERY low key. There is absolutely NO pressure to bear your soul and talk about your writing. It’s a great way to get your feet wet in a serious writing group that can help you become the best author possible while making friends with a beguiling group of like-minded artists. I hope to see you there soon. Many blessings AND KEEP WRITING!!! Stephanie

  • Workday Wordsmiths

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers

    Workday Wordsmiths offers several of the Guild’s more popular activities (Feedback, Brainstorming & Learning) in a relaxed, daytime setting. During these sessions writers will have the option of sharing a fifteen to twenty minute reading with the group for constructive feedback, such as a short story, chapter from a manuscript, or an essay. In lieu of a reading, writers will also have the option of sharing story ideas for a brainstorming session with the group. One third of the meeting will also be devoted to discussion about a specific book on the art of writing. Members will take turns leading these discussions, depending upon whatever writing guide, manual, or workbook they are interested in at the time.

  • Writers Round Robin

    Canterbury High School

    Want to bring your writing to the next level? Want to refine your skills and learn from the invaluable insights of your fellow scribes in an affable, supportive environment? Writers Round Robin is the place where all of that happens. At each meeting you’ll engage in animated discussion about diverse writing topics, hear vivid readings from two of our Guild members, and benefit from the perceptive feedback our members give each reader. At Round Robin meetings we maintain a queue of Guild Writers who would like to read a fifteen to twenty minute segment of a project he or she is working on, e.g. a short story, a chapter or scene from a novel, a scene from a stage or screenplay, a poem or essay, you get the idea. We encourage Writers from all skill levels, novice to published professional, and all genres. After each reading, the other Guild Writers attending the meeting will, in succession, offer their feedback, constructive criticism, and suggestions for improvement for approximately twenty minutes. Our goal is to be candid and frank with our reviews, specific with our advice for changes, but supportive and heartening of each writer’s efforts. Readings are strictly voluntary. No one is required to share his or her work in order to participate in Writers Round Robin meetings. No one is even required to give feedback, for that matter. It is perfectly acceptable for Guild Members to simply listen to the readings and the commentary. Writers who are sharing their work are encouraged, but not required, to provide hard copies for other members at the meeting to follow along and offer written comments and editing suggestions. If you have never been to a writer’s group where authors share and critique one another’s work, please keep in mind a few guidelines. (1) Not everyone is going to write in your genre. Quite a few of the submissions will represent books, short stories or articles that you would never have any interest in reading outside of the group. You will hear and read all skill levels of creative writing. Be patient with your fellow authors. We are here to support one another, not to showboat or tear one another down. Everyone’s writing evolves the more they keep at the craft. (2) When offering your comments, it’s a great idea to start off by telling the author what you liked about their reading. It could be something as simple as a particular verb, adjective or metaphor that popped off the page. Then go into your suggestions about what the author might consider changing. Some people favor the “sandwich” rule of critiquing. Start and end with positive comments, with the constructive, but negative feedback sandwiched in the middle. (3) When it comes to the negative, try not tell the author absolutely everything you think they should change about their work. Take notes and focus on the larger issues, or the comments that other members have not already mentioned. If all else fails, focus on the grammar. (4) It helps to be specific with your comments. For example, if the writer uses too many redundant adjectives or modifiers, suggest which ones you would cut or, even better, a distinct noun that makes the use of modifiers unnecessary. (5) If it is your turn to read for the first time, please do not be discouraged. Any writer who does not develop a thick skin will have a difficult time enjoying this profession. Keep writing, and above all, keep coming back to the meetings and sharing.

  • Shut Up & Write

    Fortezza Coffee

    Talk is cheap (but necessary at times). So put pen and paper where your mouth is and join in a writing session. Sure, bounce ideas around or ask about a questionable phrase or even plot point, but come with the intention of walking out with a page or two in your hand.

  • Workday Wordsmiths

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers

    Workday Wordsmiths offers several of the Guild’s more popular activities (Feedback, Brainstorming & Learning) in a relaxed, daytime setting. During these sessions writers will have the option of sharing a fifteen to twenty minute reading with the group for constructive feedback, such as a short story, chapter from a manuscript, or an essay. In lieu of a reading, writers will also have the option of sharing story ideas for a brainstorming session with the group. One third of the meeting will also be devoted to discussion about a specific book on the art of writing. Members will take turns leading these discussions, depending upon whatever writing guide, manual, or workbook they are interested in at the time.

  • Writers Round Robin

    Canterbury High School

    Want to bring your writing to the next level? Want to refine your skills and learn from the invaluable insights of your fellow scribes in an affable, supportive environment? Writers Round Robin is the place where all of that happens. At each meeting you’ll engage in animated discussion about diverse writing topics, hear vivid readings from two of our Guild members, and benefit from the perceptive feedback our members give each reader. At Round Robin meetings we maintain a queue of Guild Writers who would like to read a fifteen to twenty minute segment of a project he or she is working on, e.g. a short story, a chapter or scene from a novel, a scene from a stage or screenplay, a poem or essay, you get the idea. We encourage Writers from all skill levels, novice to published professional, and all genres. After each reading, the other Guild Writers attending the meeting will, in succession, offer their feedback, constructive criticism, and suggestions for improvement for approximately twenty minutes. Our goal is to be candid and frank with our reviews, specific with our advice for changes, but supportive and heartening of each writer’s efforts. Readings are strictly voluntary. No one is required to share his or her work in order to participate in Writers Round Robin meetings. No one is even required to give feedback, for that matter. It is perfectly acceptable for Guild Members to simply listen to the readings and the commentary. Writers who are sharing their work are encouraged, but not required, to provide hard copies for other members at the meeting to follow along and offer written comments and editing suggestions. If you have never been to a writer’s group where authors share and critique one another’s work, please keep in mind a few guidelines. (1) Not everyone is going to write in your genre. Quite a few of the submissions will represent books, short stories or articles that you would never have any interest in reading outside of the group. You will hear and read all skill levels of creative writing. Be patient with your fellow authors. We are here to support one another, not to showboat or tear one another down. Everyone’s writing evolves the more they keep at the craft. (2) When offering your comments, it’s a great idea to start off by telling the author what you liked about their reading. It could be something as simple as a particular verb, adjective or metaphor that popped off the page. Then go into your suggestions about what the author might consider changing. Some people favor the “sandwich” rule of critiquing. Start and end with positive comments, with the constructive, but negative feedback sandwiched in the middle. (3) When it comes to the negative, try not tell the author absolutely everything you think they should change about their work. Take notes and focus on the larger issues, or the comments that other members have not already mentioned. If all else fails, focus on the grammar. (4) It helps to be specific with your comments. For example, if the writer uses too many redundant adjectives or modifiers, suggest which ones you would cut or, even better, a distinct noun that makes the use of modifiers unnecessary. (5) If it is your turn to read for the first time, please do not be discouraged. Any writer who does not develop a thick skin will have a difficult time enjoying this profession. Keep writing, and above all, keep coming back to the meetings and sharing.

  • Pubs & Prose Night - Come carouse with trailblazing local writers & talk shop

    Have you ever dared to imagine how magnificent it would be to converse, rap, discourse with your fellow scribes and authors (both published and aspiring) within the convivial surroundings of a local pub? One with a mind-blowing selection of craft brews to spark the imagination and satisfy the artistic palate? Papa Hemingway described the artists’ community in Paris in the 1920’s as a “moveable feast,” a nightly gathering of the most talented writers, painters, sculptors, and composers of their time, that moved from bar to bar throughout the City of Lights. FWWG's Pubs & Prose Night is a 21st Century revival of the Moveable Feast here in Fort Wayne amongst the writing community. Minus the tuberculosis and absinthe, of course. Luckily we happen to have a city teeming with talented, hops and barley-loving storytellers to fit the bill. Monday nights at JK O’Donnell’s (121 W Wayne St.) affords the perfect environment for the Fort Wayne Writers Guild to continue our noble discourse on the fine art of writing in a setting as gregarious as the fellowship our Guild has engendered. The second Monday of the month is also the ONLY night when JK's offers Live Traditional Irish Music. Enough blarney and brogue to break even the worst writers block. We promise. No readings, just a group of fascinating local writers talking shop, talking smack, and sometimes expounding on life's great pageantry over a few excellent brews. Or not. It’s a bar, so everything’s naturally going to be less structured. That’s the idea. If you're not a drinker, don't worry. Plenty of our members have an amazing time filled with laughter and animated discussion while sipping on nothing but root beer and ice water. Camaraderie is the point of the gathering. Beer is just a tasty but, ultimately, unnecessary facilitator of that goal. I encourage all Guild Writers to consider attending this event, ESPECIALLY NEW MEMBERS who haven’t attended a Guild meeting yet. Pubs & Prose is VERY low key. There is absolutely NO pressure to bear your soul and talk about your writing. It’s a great way to get your feet wet in a serious writing group that can help you become the best author possible while making friends with a beguiling group of like-minded artists. I hope to see you there soon. Many blessings AND KEEP WRITING!!! Stephanie

  • Workday Wordsmiths

    Barnes & Noble Booksellers

    Workday Wordsmiths offers several of the Guild’s more popular activities (Feedback, Brainstorming & Learning) in a relaxed, daytime setting. During these sessions writers will have the option of sharing a fifteen to twenty minute reading with the group for constructive feedback, such as a short story, chapter from a manuscript, or an essay. In lieu of a reading, writers will also have the option of sharing story ideas for a brainstorming session with the group. One third of the meeting will also be devoted to discussion about a specific book on the art of writing. Members will take turns leading these discussions, depending upon whatever writing guide, manual, or workbook they are interested in at the time.