addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscontroller-playcrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1light-bulblinklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Handling the Salary Question: Salary negotiation tactics

Negotiating salary is an area in which most job hunters do not do very well, and when the pressure is on to give out salary information too soon in the interviewing process many job hunters give in to the demands of those requesting it, whether it is Human Resources or the hiring manager. Negotiating salary is a “game” but one that can turn into a nightmare if not handled strategically.
Chip Conlin discusses the four steps of salary negotiations used by The Five O’clock Club that can turn your negotiations into successful job offers.
Seating is on a first come, first seated basis unless otherwise noted.

Join or login to comment.

  • A former member
    A former member

    Well-attended. Chip was competent as usual. The audience seemed to be vexed by one question, judging from the number of times it was asked in various forms and shapes, and that pertained to the frequent practice of online applications to require the applicant to enter their range of expected or desired salary.

    July 19, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Chip didn't so much answer as solicit responses from the audience. Those job applications that require you to reveal your expected compensation, either by entering a single figure or by entering a low and a high, are annoying because they aren't playing fair. No, they're not violating any laws but they seem unfair. They raise the specter that your application may be filtered against that one criteria, money. It doesn't seem fair since it cheapens the process and trivializes the applicant's skills and experience.

      July 19, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Anyway, Chip pointed out that some applicants enter $1 or some ludicrous figure but he said at the same time that the applicant risks being thought of as a smart ass. But the employer's a smart ass too for asking that question in the first place, I think. What do you think?

      July 19, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Lots of useful information.

    July 19, 2013

  • Jessica

    Newly unemployed and looking forward to joining.

    July 19, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi, have own business and love to learn more

    July 18, 2013

37 went

Our Sponsors

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy