What we're about

What we're about

Cloud-native is an approach to building and running applications that fully exploits the advantages of the cloud computing delivery model. Cloud-native is about how applications are created and deployed, not where. While today public cloud impacts the thinking about infrastructure investment for virtually every industry, a cloud-like delivery model isn’t exclusive to public environments. It's appropriate for both public and private clouds. Most important is the ability to offer nearly limitless computing power, on-demand, along with modern data and application services for developers. When companies build and operate applications in a cloud-native fashion, they bring new ideas to market faster and respond sooner to customer demands.

Components of Cloud-Native:

DevOps is the collaboration between software developers and IT operations with the goal of constantly delivering high-quality software that solves customer challenges. It creates a culture and environment where building, testing and releasing software happens rapidly, frequently, and more consistently.

Continuous Delivery, enabled by Agile product development practices, is all about shipping small batches of software to production constantly, through automation. Continuous delivery makes the act of releasing dull and reliable, so organizations can deliver frequently, at less risk, and get feedback faster from end users.

Microservices is an architectural approach to developing an application as a collection of small services; each service implements business capabilities, runs in its own process and communicates via HTTP APIs or messaging. Each microservice can be deployed, upgraded, scaled, and restarted independent of other services in the application, typically as part of an automated system, enabling frequent updates to live applications without impacting end customers.

Containers offer both efficiency and speed compared with standard virtual machines (VMs). Using operating system (OS)-level virtualization, a single OS instance is dynamically divided among one or more isolated containers, each with a unique writable file system and resource quota. The low overhead of creating and destroying containers combined with the high packing density in a single VM makes containers an ideal compute vehicle for deploying individual microservices.

Organizations require a platform for building and operating cloud-native applications and services that automates and integrates the concepts of DevOps, continuous delivery, microservices, and containers:

Cloud Foundry ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=em-W0rVbCLc ) is the industry’s open Cloud Native platform and provides a choice of clouds, frameworks and application services. A Cloud Native platform makes it much easier to deploy, run and scale applications. As an open source project, there is a broad community both contributing and supporting Cloud Foundry.

This Meetup is dedicated to fostering community engagement, contribution support for Cloud Native & Cloud Foundry in Grand Rapids, MI.

Upcoming events (4+)

Tanzu Tuesdays

Online event

https://www.makejarnotwar.com/episode/0006/

Join Us for an exploration of testing a reactive Spring Boot 2.x application. Test driven development gives us the confidence necessary to improve our code faster, safely. But how do you test components and services, as well as integrations across distributed systems, while maintaining fast feedback loops, and how do you do all of this within the context of reactive Java? In this talk, we’ll look at how to test imperative components, reactive data flows, and mocks. We’ll examine how to take advantage of test slices, and how to test web applications. We’ll look at how to ensure that API producers and consumers work well together using consumer driven contract testing without sacrificing the testing pyramid for end-to-end integration tests. And we’ll do it all within the context of reactive programming, in Kotlin.

Tanzu Tuesdays

Online event

https://www.makejarnotwar.com/episode/0006/

Join Us for an exploration of testing a reactive Spring Boot 2.x application. Test driven development gives us the confidence necessary to improve our code faster, safely. But how do you test components and services, as well as integrations across distributed systems, while maintaining fast feedback loops, and how do you do all of this within the context of reactive Java? In this talk, we’ll look at how to test imperative components, reactive data flows, and mocks. We’ll examine how to take advantage of test slices, and how to test web applications. We’ll look at how to ensure that API producers and consumers work well together using consumer driven contract testing without sacrificing the testing pyramid for end-to-end integration tests. And we’ll do it all within the context of reactive programming, in Kotlin.

Tanzu Tuesdays

Online event

https://www.makejarnotwar.com/episode/0006/

Join Us for an exploration of testing a reactive Spring Boot 2.x application. Test driven development gives us the confidence necessary to improve our code faster, safely. But how do you test components and services, as well as integrations across distributed systems, while maintaining fast feedback loops, and how do you do all of this within the context of reactive Java? In this talk, we’ll look at how to test imperative components, reactive data flows, and mocks. We’ll examine how to take advantage of test slices, and how to test web applications. We’ll look at how to ensure that API producers and consumers work well together using consumer driven contract testing without sacrificing the testing pyramid for end-to-end integration tests. And we’ll do it all within the context of reactive programming, in Kotlin.

Tanzu Tuesdays

Online event

https://www.makejarnotwar.com/episode/0006/

Join Us for an exploration of testing a reactive Spring Boot 2.x application. Test driven development gives us the confidence necessary to improve our code faster, safely. But how do you test components and services, as well as integrations across distributed systems, while maintaining fast feedback loops, and how do you do all of this within the context of reactive Java? In this talk, we’ll look at how to test imperative components, reactive data flows, and mocks. We’ll examine how to take advantage of test slices, and how to test web applications. We’ll look at how to ensure that API producers and consumers work well together using consumer driven contract testing without sacrificing the testing pyramid for end-to-end integration tests. And we’ll do it all within the context of reactive programming, in Kotlin.

Past events (166)

Tanzu Tuesdays

Online event

Photos (32)