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Greater Denver Urban Homesteading Group Message Board Food Producing Animals › Queen honeybee for trade or giveaway.

Queen honeybee for trade or giveaway.

Mike G.
user 9497514
Denver, CO
Post #: 1
Dear group,

I just received an Italian variety honeybee queen to replace the queen in my colony that I thought was dead after I released her too quick after installation. I found my queen today - rookie error (her paint mark had worn off). I am willing to give away the queen and her small retinue (already in queen cage with cork and candy in place), especially to a backyard beekeeper in Denver. Of course, I would also take a trade for some good veggies later in the summer. You can contact me at: ingrid240@gmail.com. Act fast, because I'll only have her healthy for a few days.



Everett S.
user 3883092
Denver, CO
Post #: 34
I'd hate for an Italian Honeybee Queen to go to waste. Email me if you want me to email this out to the group.

I caught a swarm last week and am hoping the queen is in there, although I haven't tried looking for her yet. I'm a rookie too. Do you know, will they create their own queen if I didn't end up getting her? I'm assuming I did because they're all still in the hive and seem to be going about their bee business.
Kay H.
user 9171294
Kittredge, CO
Post #: 10
Everett,

Your newly collected swarm should have a queen in it. It is the queen that (for whatever reason) decides to swarm out of a hive. She leaves and takes half (if not all) the hive with her. If there are any left behind they are left with the task of raising another queen for themselves. Many times they make preparations for a new queen before the old one leaves. They also know when the queen is aging and less productive and start the queen rearing process.

Many commercial beekeepers requeen their hives every, or every other, year. I would rather allow them to take care of themselves. They've been doing it for thousands of years.....

Hope this helps...
--Kay in Kittredge
A former member
Post #: 3
I would be very interested if you still have it. I have no CLUE what I am doing, but I have several very large Russian sage plants and the bees absolutely LOVE them not to mention other bee-friendly flowers. So if you are willing to pass it on along with some know-hows, that would be great.

Holly
Derec
shulerd
Denver, CO
Post #: 17
Hey Holly, you need a hive first. If you're looking to get into beekeeping, there are several other of us novices out here. We captured four swarms last weekend which wasn't that hard and have them in hives now (we have two and David has the others). We built our top-bar hives though you can also get some great deals on Craigslist. I think if you go to the Homesteading Books link here, you can order Bee Keeping for Dummies, another great resource to learn about bees!
Rebecca A.
user 3177502
Englewood, CO
Post #: 3
Backyard Hives in Eldorado Springs near Boulder is another excellent source for education and supplies to get started with top bar beekeeping. They've been doing it for over a dozen years. See their link in the sponsors section to the left.
Everett S.
user 3883092
Denver, CO
Post #: 49
Thanks Kay. I know how a swarm works ;-) but was concerned that I didn't get the queen in the swarm because it was on the ground and there were still hundreds of bees left crawling around when I finally closed up the box to take it home.

I'm pretty sure they're good to go though because they're up to seven combs now!
A former member
Post #: 239
I am wanting to make a bee hive and start a new project this summer. I have a few questions if there are some bee people that know:
Is there any special time that the bees are swarming?
What is the best attractant to use?
What is the easiest and best bee box to make?
A former member
Post #: 1
I'd hate for an Italian Honeybee Queen to go to waste. Email me if you want me to email this out to the group.

I caught a swarm last week and am hoping the queen is in there, although I haven't tried looking for her yet. I'm a rookie too. Do you know, will they create their own queen if I didn't end up getting her? I'm assuming I did because they're all still in the hive and seem to be going about their bee business.

Worker bees need to have eggs 1-3 days old to "make" a queen. No queen, no eggs. If you still have the swarm, you more than likely have the queen too. awesome!!
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