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Knit One, Compute One

  • 21st Floor, The Hive, The Phoenix Bldg

    23 Luard Rd, Wanchai, Hong Kong (map)

    22.278780 114.171608

  • We are pretty excited to have Kris Howard speaking at the next meetup, since she is only in town for a few days. You should come join us if you like coding (even if it's a little) or you like knitting, or neither :) 

    Kristina is an excellent storyteller and we can guarantee you'll have a fun evening and learn loads. She did this talk earlier at YOW! Conferences in Australia and it was a big hit. We think you'll enjoy it too.

    --

    Can a programming language describe art? Is knitting Turing complete? And just how many bytes of data does the average knitted scarf hold, anyway?

    These are the questions that motivate Kris as both a knitter and a technologist. As an art form, knitting is inherently binary - just knit and purl. That means you can use sticks and string to encode data in a lot of different ways - like recording the day’s weather, noting enemy troop movements, or even knitting a computer virus. But that’s just the start! Through the act of knitting, the crafter becomes a kind of human CPU, utilising objects and data structures (needles) and free memory (ball of wool) to implement instructions (the pattern). Knitting patterns themselves are very similar to computer languages, with new syntax proposals emerging with innovative constructs and even compilers.

    If you thought knitting was just an old-fashioned hobby, this talk will open your eyes to the many ways this traditional craft is still relevant in the digital age. (And no, you don’t need to know how to knit!)


    Bio

    Kris Howard has been building websites in one form or another for over twenty years. She’s been a developer, a business analyst, and a manager at technology startups in the UK and Australia, most recently at Canva in Sydney. She now heads up Developer Relations for YOW! Conferences, meeting and working with developers around Australia and Asia. In her spare time she knits and sews, hacks on her personal sites, and helps organise events for the local Girl Geeks chapter. Her Instagram account is pretty much all selfies and food. 

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