What we're about

Come and join our group of drummers who love meeting up to play the djembe and dundun rhythms of West Africa. No experience necessary and no need to book a course - try it for a night and see if you like it! I've been running this community group / class in High Wycombe since 1998. There are 3 levels beginners, intermediate and advanced. You will learn how to play the djembe (goblet shaped hand drum) and get to play many of the amazing traditional rhythms from West Africa. When you're ready, you can also join the performance group, The Hartbeats Vitae Drummers.

Upcoming events (5+)

New drummers are welcome to join any week, no experience needed!

The Royal Grammar School, Amersham Road

Hi new drummer, Please make sure that you click on the "read more" so you can scroll down to see all the information. I've created these Meetup groups so that more people get to find out about my classes. The classes existed long before Meetup started. Regular attendees of my classes do not generally use Meetup. There are many more people attending than is shown on this Meetup group or event. If you join my classes I use email to communicate. My email address is [masked] Here's some general info that I send out to people interested in joining my African drumming classes: When can I start and do I need to book or sign up for a course? You can start any week and there is always space for new people to join. The classes are run on a "pay as you go" weekly basis so no need to pay for a course upfront. We play every week i.e. do not stop over the usual school holidays. Are drums provided? Yes I have djembes for new drummers to use at the class. I need to know how many djembe drums to bring with me each week. So for the first session you attend, please let me know you are coming on the day (a text is fine). It’s helpful to let me know if you have decided to come back and become a regular attendee - I’ll then keep bringing a drum for you each week without you needing to ask each time. If you become a regular attendee and can’t come, please let me know to save me loading drums that are not needed. Your contact details Giving me both your mobile phone number and email address is recommended. It is unusual for the class to be cancelled or moved venue on the day but it does happen and on these occasions you’ll receive a text. I also send emails with details of any changes as well as performance dates or about any other relevant African drumming event information. What we do The Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group has been running in Bucks since 1998. We play West African rhythms on djembes (goblet shaped hand drums) and dunduns (bass drums played with a stick). Occasionally I’ll add an African song to be sung with a particular rhythm. We regularly perform at local community events as well as meet up for drumming social gatherings a few times a year. About the rhythms The rhythms come from West African countries such as Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast and Sierre Leone and were played for a specific reason - for example Kassa is a farming rhythm. They are still played in West Africa for these cultural celebrations / events as well as performed on stage by drum and dance groups in West Africa often called “ballets”. The core of each rhythm usually consists of two to three djembe accompaniments and dundun parts. In the Guinean drumming tradition there are usually three dunduns - sangban (middle sized), kenkeni (smaller higher note) and dundunba (largest with deeper bass). The dundun melody usually defines what rhythm we are playing. We often play an arrangement of a rhythm by adding introductions, “breaks” and solo phrases to the traditional djembe and dundun parts. There is also space for “soloing” where one person at a time improvises over the rhythm or plays something based around traditional solo phrases. Some people never solo and no one is expected to! Who comes to the Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group? The group has a mix of playing levels - from beginner to professional. Some drummers have been playing in the group for more than a decade, others will have only just recently joined. It is mainly adults but we welcome any age and there are a few children accompanied by a parent or guardian. People with no previous musical experience join us as well as experienced musicians. During the classes we are “seriously” learning and practising rhythms and developing drumming skills but it is also a fun group activity. In addition to the weekly classes, the members enjoy annual social gatherings which include a camping weekend and getting together for performances. What happens in the class? On your first week I’ll spend a bit of time showing you the djembe technique which is how to play a bass, tone and slap sound. It’s worth stressing that it can take some time to make a decent sound and everyone, including top professional players are always striving to improve this! Each week we work on a number of different West African rhythms and you’ll start by just playing some of the djembe parts and you won’t be expected to learn and play everything. More complex parts will be played by experienced drummers. The dunduns can be played by everyone and I encourage less experienced drummers to try more simple parts although most beginners want to concentrate on the djembe at first. We are very lucky to have some highly skilled drummers in the group who are willing and able to play more complex dundun rhythms. As the evening progresses to level 2 and 3, everyone usually takes a turn play dundun drums at some point. Progression Everyone progresses at their own rate, like anything in life and practising at home will help. I suggest recording during the class or notating the rhythms. I do not use notation but others in the group do and can help you with this. I learn by recording and can give you advice on this but I do not give out recordings that I have made. Owning your own djembe or dunduns that you can practise on at home if you are able to, makes a huge difference. Home practise is also the only way to really improve on djembe technique. I also provide private lessons so do get in touch if you are interested in this. Do I need to bring anything? We only play djembe and dunduns so no need to bring any other type of drum. It can get quite loud for some people and so they bring earplugs. Currently the Tuesday class is in a big space with carpet and most people do not find it too loud. The Wednesday class is in a smaller space without carpet so more people have been using earplugs. Most people purchase the type made for musicians (cost £8 - £20) i.e. not earplugs for sleeping which completely block the sound. If you wear rings, you’ll need to take them off but some people have rings that won’t come off - if this is you, bring a plaster to wrap around the ring. If you come regularly you will need to find a way to take your rings off in order to play with the correct technique. If you want to buy a djembe Do not buy from the internet! So many people have bought what I call “buckets” from the web even though it might have been sold as a “master” or “pro” djembe. There are many different things that I look to assess the quality of a djembe - including the shell needing to be heavy hard wood from Guinea, Mali, Senegal or Ivory Coast. Unless you really know about djembes, you’ll buy a drum that won’t ever make a good sound. Playing a quality drum makes drumming more joyful! If you are interested in buying a djembe, let me know and I’ll point you in the right direction. If buying from a supplier that I recommend: a fairly good drum would be around £200 and an excellent drum would be around £250 - £350. Hartbeats Vitae Drummers performance group The majority of our performances are in the summer for local community events. Most people are not ready to join in the performances until they have been drumming long enough to get to know the rhythms and also regularly attend level 2 session. No one has to perform if they don’t want to. Our performance outfit is a Hartbeats Vitae Drummers t-shirt + black trousers or African print trousers. I encourage people to buy their own t-shirt (£10) if they are going to be regularly performing. I also have a few spare ones. What time / days are the classes? Tuesday evenings @ The Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe Wednesday evenings @ St Marys Church, Wendover I arrive at 6.45pm (just in case you get there really early and find no one is there). Everyone who comes to the level 1 session arrives then to get the drums in from my van and help set up. The sessions are: 6.45 – 7.45 level 1 7.15 – 8.45 level 2 7.45 – 10.00 level 3 (includes 15min tea-break) You’ll see that level 2 people join in the middle of level 1 session. So they stay on when you go after the first hour. Once you have been learning for a while, you can then stay on to do level 2. How long this takes is really down to the individual. Some will be joining level 2 within 6 months, for others it might take them over a year. At level 3 we play more advanced rhythms and techniques. How much are the classes? You will need to pay this at the end of your session each week. If you do not have your own djembe drum to bring, there is an additional £2 drum hire charge. Level 1: (beginners 1 hour session) £6 Level 1 & 2: (2 hour session) £9 Level 2: (1.5 hr session) £8 Level 3: (2 hr session) £9

New drummers are welcome to join any week, no experience needed!

The Royal Grammar School, Amersham Road

Hi new drummer, Please make sure that you click on the "read more" so you can scroll down to see all the information. I've created these Meetup groups so that more people get to find out about my classes. The classes existed long before Meetup started. Regular attendees of my classes do not generally use Meetup. There are many more people attending than is shown on this Meetup group or event. If you join my classes I use email to communicate. My email address is [masked] Here's some general info that I send out to people interested in joining my African drumming classes: When can I start and do I need to book or sign up for a course? You can start any week and there is always space for new people to join. The classes are run on a "pay as you go" weekly basis so no need to pay for a course upfront. We play every week i.e. do not stop over the usual school holidays. Are drums provided? Yes I have djembes for new drummers to use at the class. I need to know how many djembe drums to bring with me each week. So for the first session you attend, please let me know you are coming on the day (a text is fine). It’s helpful to let me know if you have decided to come back and become a regular attendee - I’ll then keep bringing a drum for you each week without you needing to ask each time. If you become a regular attendee and can’t come, please let me know to save me loading drums that are not needed. Your contact details Giving me both your mobile phone number and email address is recommended. It is unusual for the class to be cancelled or moved venue on the day but it does happen and on these occasions you’ll receive a text. I also send emails with details of any changes as well as performance dates or about any other relevant African drumming event information. What we do The Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group has been running in Bucks since 1998. We play West African rhythms on djembes (goblet shaped hand drums) and dunduns (bass drums played with a stick). Occasionally I’ll add an African song to be sung with a particular rhythm. We regularly perform at local community events as well as meet up for drumming social gatherings a few times a year. About the rhythms The rhythms come from West African countries such as Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast and Sierre Leone and were played for a specific reason - for example Kassa is a farming rhythm. They are still played in West Africa for these cultural celebrations / events as well as performed on stage by drum and dance groups in West Africa often called “ballets”. The core of each rhythm usually consists of two to three djembe accompaniments and dundun parts. In the Guinean drumming tradition there are usually three dunduns - sangban (middle sized), kenkeni (smaller higher note) and dundunba (largest with deeper bass). The dundun melody usually defines what rhythm we are playing. We often play an arrangement of a rhythm by adding introductions, “breaks” and solo phrases to the traditional djembe and dundun parts. There is also space for “soloing” where one person at a time improvises over the rhythm or plays something based around traditional solo phrases. Some people never solo and no one is expected to! Who comes to the Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group? The group has a mix of playing levels - from beginner to professional. Some drummers have been playing in the group for more than a decade, others will have only just recently joined. It is mainly adults but we welcome any age and there are a few children accompanied by a parent or guardian. People with no previous musical experience join us as well as experienced musicians. During the classes we are “seriously” learning and practising rhythms and developing drumming skills but it is also a fun group activity. In addition to the weekly classes, the members enjoy annual social gatherings which include a camping weekend and getting together for performances. What happens in the class? On your first week I’ll spend a bit of time showing you the djembe technique which is how to play a bass, tone and slap sound. It’s worth stressing that it can take some time to make a decent sound and everyone, including top professional players are always striving to improve this! Each week we work on a number of different West African rhythms and you’ll start by just playing some of the djembe parts and you won’t be expected to learn and play everything. More complex parts will be played by experienced drummers. The dunduns can be played by everyone and I encourage less experienced drummers to try more simple parts although most beginners want to concentrate on the djembe at first. We are very lucky to have some highly skilled drummers in the group who are willing and able to play more complex dundun rhythms. As the evening progresses to level 2 and 3, everyone usually takes a turn play dundun drums at some point. Progression Everyone progresses at their own rate, like anything in life and practising at home will help. I suggest recording during the class or notating the rhythms. I do not use notation but others in the group do and can help you with this. I learn by recording and can give you advice on this but I do not give out recordings that I have made. Owning your own djembe or dunduns that you can practise on at home if you are able to, makes a huge difference. Home practise is also the only way to really improve on djembe technique. I also provide private lessons so do get in touch if you are interested in this. Do I need to bring anything? We only play djembe and dunduns so no need to bring any other type of drum. It can get quite loud for some people and so they bring earplugs. Currently the Tuesday class is in a big space with carpet and most people do not find it too loud. The Wednesday class is in a smaller space without carpet so more people have been using earplugs. Most people purchase the type made for musicians (cost £8 - £20) i.e. not earplugs for sleeping which completely block the sound. If you wear rings, you’ll need to take them off but some people have rings that won’t come off - if this is you, bring a plaster to wrap around the ring. If you come regularly you will need to find a way to take your rings off in order to play with the correct technique. If you want to buy a djembe Do not buy from the internet! So many people have bought what I call “buckets” from the web even though it might have been sold as a “master” or “pro” djembe. There are many different things that I look to assess the quality of a djembe - including the shell needing to be heavy hard wood from Guinea, Mali, Senegal or Ivory Coast. Unless you really know about djembes, you’ll buy a drum that won’t ever make a good sound. Playing a quality drum makes drumming more joyful! If you are interested in buying a djembe, let me know and I’ll point you in the right direction. If buying from a supplier that I recommend: a fairly good drum would be around £200 and an excellent drum would be around £250 - £350. Hartbeats Vitae Drummers performance group The majority of our performances are in the summer for local community events. Most people are not ready to join in the performances until they have been drumming long enough to get to know the rhythms and also regularly attend level 2 session. No one has to perform if they don’t want to. Our performance outfit is a Hartbeats Vitae Drummers t-shirt + black trousers or African print trousers. I encourage people to buy their own t-shirt (£10) if they are going to be regularly performing. I also have a few spare ones. What time / days are the classes? Tuesday evenings @ The Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe Wednesday evenings @ St Marys Church, Wendover I arrive at 6.45pm (just in case you get there really early and find no one is there). Everyone who comes to the level 1 session arrives then to get the drums in from my van and help set up. The sessions are: 6.45 – 7.45 level 1 7.15 – 8.45 level 2 7.45 – 10.00 level 3 (includes 15min tea-break) You’ll see that level 2 people join in the middle of level 1 session. So they stay on when you go after the first hour. Once you have been learning for a while, you can then stay on to do level 2. How long this takes is really down to the individual. Some will be joining level 2 within 6 months, for others it might take them over a year. At level 3 we play more advanced rhythms and techniques. How much are the classes? You will need to pay this at the end of your session each week. If you do not have your own djembe drum to bring, there is an additional £2 drum hire charge. Level 1: (beginners 1 hour session) £6 Level 1 & 2: (2 hour session) £9 Level 2: (1.5 hr session) £8 Level 3: (2 hr session) £9

New drummers are welcome to join any week, no experience needed!

The Royal Grammar School, Amersham Road

Hi new drummer, Please make sure that you click on the "read more" so you can scroll down to see all the information. I've created these Meetup groups so that more people get to find out about my classes. The classes existed long before Meetup started. Regular attendees of my classes do not generally use Meetup. There are many more people attending than is shown on this Meetup group or event. If you join my classes I use email to communicate. My email address is [masked] Here's some general info that I send out to people interested in joining my African drumming classes: When can I start and do I need to book or sign up for a course? You can start any week and there is always space for new people to join. The classes are run on a "pay as you go" weekly basis so no need to pay for a course upfront. We play every week i.e. do not stop over the usual school holidays. Are drums provided? Yes I have djembes for new drummers to use at the class. I need to know how many djembe drums to bring with me each week. So for the first session you attend, please let me know you are coming on the day (a text is fine). It’s helpful to let me know if you have decided to come back and become a regular attendee - I’ll then keep bringing a drum for you each week without you needing to ask each time. If you become a regular attendee and can’t come, please let me know to save me loading drums that are not needed. Your contact details Giving me both your mobile phone number and email address is recommended. It is unusual for the class to be cancelled or moved venue on the day but it does happen and on these occasions you’ll receive a text. I also send emails with details of any changes as well as performance dates or about any other relevant African drumming event information. What we do The Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group has been running in Bucks since 1998. We play West African rhythms on djembes (goblet shaped hand drums) and dunduns (bass drums played with a stick). Occasionally I’ll add an African song to be sung with a particular rhythm. We regularly perform at local community events as well as meet up for drumming social gatherings a few times a year. About the rhythms The rhythms come from West African countries such as Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast and Sierre Leone and were played for a specific reason - for example Kassa is a farming rhythm. They are still played in West Africa for these cultural celebrations / events as well as performed on stage by drum and dance groups in West Africa often called “ballets”. The core of each rhythm usually consists of two to three djembe accompaniments and dundun parts. In the Guinean drumming tradition there are usually three dunduns - sangban (middle sized), kenkeni (smaller higher note) and dundunba (largest with deeper bass). The dundun melody usually defines what rhythm we are playing. We often play an arrangement of a rhythm by adding introductions, “breaks” and solo phrases to the traditional djembe and dundun parts. There is also space for “soloing” where one person at a time improvises over the rhythm or plays something based around traditional solo phrases. Some people never solo and no one is expected to! Who comes to the Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group? The group has a mix of playing levels - from beginner to professional. Some drummers have been playing in the group for more than a decade, others will have only just recently joined. It is mainly adults but we welcome any age and there are a few children accompanied by a parent or guardian. People with no previous musical experience join us as well as experienced musicians. During the classes we are “seriously” learning and practising rhythms and developing drumming skills but it is also a fun group activity. In addition to the weekly classes, the members enjoy annual social gatherings which include a camping weekend and getting together for performances. What happens in the class? On your first week I’ll spend a bit of time showing you the djembe technique which is how to play a bass, tone and slap sound. It’s worth stressing that it can take some time to make a decent sound and everyone, including top professional players are always striving to improve this! Each week we work on a number of different West African rhythms and you’ll start by just playing some of the djembe parts and you won’t be expected to learn and play everything. More complex parts will be played by experienced drummers. The dunduns can be played by everyone and I encourage less experienced drummers to try more simple parts although most beginners want to concentrate on the djembe at first. We are very lucky to have some highly skilled drummers in the group who are willing and able to play more complex dundun rhythms. As the evening progresses to level 2 and 3, everyone usually takes a turn play dundun drums at some point. Progression Everyone progresses at their own rate, like anything in life and practising at home will help. I suggest recording during the class or notating the rhythms. I do not use notation but others in the group do and can help you with this. I learn by recording and can give you advice on this but I do not give out recordings that I have made. Owning your own djembe or dunduns that you can practise on at home if you are able to, makes a huge difference. Home practise is also the only way to really improve on djembe technique. I also provide private lessons so do get in touch if you are interested in this. Do I need to bring anything? We only play djembe and dunduns so no need to bring any other type of drum. It can get quite loud for some people and so they bring earplugs. Currently the Tuesday class is in a big space with carpet and most people do not find it too loud. The Wednesday class is in a smaller space without carpet so more people have been using earplugs. Most people purchase the type made for musicians (cost £8 - £20) i.e. not earplugs for sleeping which completely block the sound. If you wear rings, you’ll need to take them off but some people have rings that won’t come off - if this is you, bring a plaster to wrap around the ring. If you come regularly you will need to find a way to take your rings off in order to play with the correct technique. If you want to buy a djembe Do not buy from the internet! So many people have bought what I call “buckets” from the web even though it might have been sold as a “master” or “pro” djembe. There are many different things that I look to assess the quality of a djembe - including the shell needing to be heavy hard wood from Guinea, Mali, Senegal or Ivory Coast. Unless you really know about djembes, you’ll buy a drum that won’t ever make a good sound. Playing a quality drum makes drumming more joyful! If you are interested in buying a djembe, let me know and I’ll point you in the right direction. If buying from a supplier that I recommend: a fairly good drum would be around £200 and an excellent drum would be around £250 - £350. Hartbeats Vitae Drummers performance group The majority of our performances are in the summer for local community events. Most people are not ready to join in the performances until they have been drumming long enough to get to know the rhythms and also regularly attend level 2 session. No one has to perform if they don’t want to. Our performance outfit is a Hartbeats Vitae Drummers t-shirt + black trousers or African print trousers. I encourage people to buy their own t-shirt (£10) if they are going to be regularly performing. I also have a few spare ones. What time / days are the classes? Tuesday evenings @ The Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe Wednesday evenings @ St Marys Church, Wendover I arrive at 6.45pm (just in case you get there really early and find no one is there). Everyone who comes to the level 1 session arrives then to get the drums in from my van and help set up. The sessions are: 6.45 – 7.45 level 1 7.15 – 8.45 level 2 7.45 – 10.00 level 3 (includes 15min tea-break) You’ll see that level 2 people join in the middle of level 1 session. So they stay on when you go after the first hour. Once you have been learning for a while, you can then stay on to do level 2. How long this takes is really down to the individual. Some will be joining level 2 within 6 months, for others it might take them over a year. At level 3 we play more advanced rhythms and techniques. How much are the classes? You will need to pay this at the end of your session each week. If you do not have your own djembe drum to bring, there is an additional £2 drum hire charge. Level 1: (beginners 1 hour session) £6 Level 1 & 2: (2 hour session) £9 Level 2: (1.5 hr session) £8 Level 3: (2 hr session) £9

New drummers are welcome to join any week, no experience needed!

The Royal Grammar School, Amersham Road

Hi new drummer, Please make sure that you click on the "read more" so you can scroll down to see all the information. I've created these Meetup groups so that more people get to find out about my classes. The classes existed long before Meetup started. Regular attendees of my classes do not generally use Meetup. There are many more people attending than is shown on this Meetup group or event. If you join my classes I use email to communicate. My email address is [masked] Here's some general info that I send out to people interested in joining my African drumming classes: When can I start and do I need to book or sign up for a course? You can start any week and there is always space for new people to join. The classes are run on a "pay as you go" weekly basis so no need to pay for a course upfront. We play every week i.e. do not stop over the usual school holidays. Are drums provided? Yes I have djembes for new drummers to use at the class. I need to know how many djembe drums to bring with me each week. So for the first session you attend, please let me know you are coming on the day (a text is fine). It’s helpful to let me know if you have decided to come back and become a regular attendee - I’ll then keep bringing a drum for you each week without you needing to ask each time. If you become a regular attendee and can’t come, please let me know to save me loading drums that are not needed. Your contact details Giving me both your mobile phone number and email address is recommended. It is unusual for the class to be cancelled or moved venue on the day but it does happen and on these occasions you’ll receive a text. I also send emails with details of any changes as well as performance dates or about any other relevant African drumming event information. What we do The Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group has been running in Bucks since 1998. We play West African rhythms on djembes (goblet shaped hand drums) and dunduns (bass drums played with a stick). Occasionally I’ll add an African song to be sung with a particular rhythm. We regularly perform at local community events as well as meet up for drumming social gatherings a few times a year. About the rhythms The rhythms come from West African countries such as Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Ivory Coast and Sierre Leone and were played for a specific reason - for example Kassa is a farming rhythm. They are still played in West Africa for these cultural celebrations / events as well as performed on stage by drum and dance groups in West Africa often called “ballets”. The core of each rhythm usually consists of two to three djembe accompaniments and dundun parts. In the Guinean drumming tradition there are usually three dunduns - sangban (middle sized), kenkeni (smaller higher note) and dundunba (largest with deeper bass). The dundun melody usually defines what rhythm we are playing. We often play an arrangement of a rhythm by adding introductions, “breaks” and solo phrases to the traditional djembe and dundun parts. There is also space for “soloing” where one person at a time improvises over the rhythm or plays something based around traditional solo phrases. Some people never solo and no one is expected to! Who comes to the Hartbeats Vitae Drummers community group? The group has a mix of playing levels - from beginner to professional. Some drummers have been playing in the group for more than a decade, others will have only just recently joined. It is mainly adults but we welcome any age and there are a few children accompanied by a parent or guardian. People with no previous musical experience join us as well as experienced musicians. During the classes we are “seriously” learning and practising rhythms and developing drumming skills but it is also a fun group activity. In addition to the weekly classes, the members enjoy annual social gatherings which include a camping weekend and getting together for performances. What happens in the class? On your first week I’ll spend a bit of time showing you the djembe technique which is how to play a bass, tone and slap sound. It’s worth stressing that it can take some time to make a decent sound and everyone, including top professional players are always striving to improve this! Each week we work on a number of different West African rhythms and you’ll start by just playing some of the djembe parts and you won’t be expected to learn and play everything. More complex parts will be played by experienced drummers. The dunduns can be played by everyone and I encourage less experienced drummers to try more simple parts although most beginners want to concentrate on the djembe at first. We are very lucky to have some highly skilled drummers in the group who are willing and able to play more complex dundun rhythms. As the evening progresses to level 2 and 3, everyone usually takes a turn play dundun drums at some point. Progression Everyone progresses at their own rate, like anything in life and practising at home will help. I suggest recording during the class or notating the rhythms. I do not use notation but others in the group do and can help you with this. I learn by recording and can give you advice on this but I do not give out recordings that I have made. Owning your own djembe or dunduns that you can practise on at home if you are able to, makes a huge difference. Home practise is also the only way to really improve on djembe technique. I also provide private lessons so do get in touch if you are interested in this. Do I need to bring anything? We only play djembe and dunduns so no need to bring any other type of drum. It can get quite loud for some people and so they bring earplugs. Currently the Tuesday class is in a big space with carpet and most people do not find it too loud. The Wednesday class is in a smaller space without carpet so more people have been using earplugs. Most people purchase the type made for musicians (cost £8 - £20) i.e. not earplugs for sleeping which completely block the sound. If you wear rings, you’ll need to take them off but some people have rings that won’t come off - if this is you, bring a plaster to wrap around the ring. If you come regularly you will need to find a way to take your rings off in order to play with the correct technique. If you want to buy a djembe Do not buy from the internet! So many people have bought what I call “buckets” from the web even though it might have been sold as a “master” or “pro” djembe. There are many different things that I look to assess the quality of a djembe - including the shell needing to be heavy hard wood from Guinea, Mali, Senegal or Ivory Coast. Unless you really know about djembes, you’ll buy a drum that won’t ever make a good sound. Playing a quality drum makes drumming more joyful! If you are interested in buying a djembe, let me know and I’ll point you in the right direction. If buying from a supplier that I recommend: a fairly good drum would be around £200 and an excellent drum would be around £250 - £350. Hartbeats Vitae Drummers performance group The majority of our performances are in the summer for local community events. Most people are not ready to join in the performances until they have been drumming long enough to get to know the rhythms and also regularly attend level 2 session. No one has to perform if they don’t want to. Our performance outfit is a Hartbeats Vitae Drummers t-shirt + black trousers or African print trousers. I encourage people to buy their own t-shirt (£10) if they are going to be regularly performing. I also have a few spare ones. What time / days are the classes? Tuesday evenings @ The Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe Wednesday evenings @ St Marys Church, Wendover I arrive at 6.45pm (just in case you get there really early and find no one is there). Everyone who comes to the level 1 session arrives then to get the drums in from my van and help set up. The sessions are: 6.45 – 7.45 level 1 7.15 – 8.45 level 2 7.45 – 10.00 level 3 (includes 15min tea-break) You’ll see that level 2 people join in the middle of level 1 session. So they stay on when you go after the first hour. Once you have been learning for a while, you can then stay on to do level 2. How long this takes is really down to the individual. Some will be joining level 2 within 6 months, for others it might take them over a year. At level 3 we play more advanced rhythms and techniques. How much are the classes? You will need to pay this at the end of your session each week. If you do not have your own djembe drum to bring, there is an additional £2 drum hire charge. Level 1: (beginners 1 hour session) £6 Level 1 & 2: (2 hour session) £9 Level 2: (1.5 hr session) £8 Level 3: (2 hr session) £9

Past events (151)

New drummers are welcome to join any week, no experience needed!

The Royal Grammar School, Amersham Road

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