Past Meetup

Memorial Weekend: Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve (Easy-Moderate-Exploratory)

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Let's celebrate Day 2 Memorial Weekend and make it memorable by visiting Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve. Thanks to those who took photos of this place, it's so inspiring and hope we will get some pictures like them. Please indicate when RSVP if you will meet at Seagrove Park or at Torrey Pines for short hikes

Meet at visitor center: 5PM or at Seagrove Park 4PM
Duration: 2-4 hours (Short Hike: at Visitor Center 2-3hrs & Long Hike: at Seagrove Park)
Distance: 3-10 miles
Elevation:[masked]ft

Difficulty: Easy-Moderate

What to bring: plenty of water, food, snacks for lunch and a long day sun screen, your regular hiking gears essentials (water, snacks, sunscreen, hat, hiking shoes) These are places for photos taking, so your camera as well and most important 10 Hiking Essentials http://www.meetup.com/HikingOC/messages/boards/thread/9535234

About Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve: is located within San Diego city limits and yet remains one of the wildest stretches of land on our Southern California coast! Because of the efforts and foresight of the people in this area, 2000 acres of land are as they were before San Diego was developed -with the chaparral plant community, the rare and elegant Torrey pine trees, miles of unspoiled beaches, and a lagoon that is vital to migrating seabirds. One can imagine what California must have looked like to the early settlers, or to the Spanish explorers, or even to the first California residents here, the Kumeyaay people (http://www.torreypine.org/history/history.html). More info: http://www.torreypine.org/parks/basic-information.html

Trails Map: http://www.torreypine.org/img/activities/maps/trailmap-2-high.pdf

There are sections of hiking trails which parallel the bluff edge high above the sea and several viewing platforms built right at the bluff edge. They are excellent sites for observing the yearly migration of the Gray Whales (http://www.torreypine.org/animals/whales.html) and the dolphins who patrol the shores year round. These high viewing sites also allow one to look down at a steep angle and see beneath the sea surface. With a monocular telescope set up at one of these spots I was once shown leopard sharks swimming by several feet beneath the surface and could clearly see the creatures and the spotted markings that explain their name. The range of elevations, from sea level and below to 300 feet; soils which vary from silt and mud to sand and eroded sand stone; varying exposures to salt water, fresh water, tides, wind, and fog: all these factors have produced many different environments for living things within the relatively small, two thousand acres of the Reserve. The plant communities include coastal strand, coastal scrub, chaparral, Torrey pine woodland, salt marsh, as well as fresh water marsh and riparian. And each of these communities or ecosystems includes its own interdependent web of insect, reptile, fungal, and bacterial life as well as the characteristic plant species by which it is defined

Location-Directions Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve is located between La Jolla and Del Mar, California, north of San Diego. Take Hwy 5 to Carmel Valley Road, go west to North Torrey Pines Rd. Go south (left) about a mile to the Reserve entrance (right) at the foot of the hill. The park entrance is on your right just before the highway begins to climb the Torrey Pines grade. 12600 North Torrey Pines Road, San Diego CA 92037 GPS:[masked], [masked]
Fees
There is a parking fee for any car entering the Reserve. $10.00 ($8.00 for seniors, $5 for disabled with DPR pass) everyday. See website for latest fees

REMINDER

***By joining the meetup, you agree to Meetup Terms of Service releases the Organizer and Assistant Organizers from any liability related to incidents that occur at Meetup gatherings***
> YOU acknowledge THAT WE ARE NOT PROFESSIONALS.
> YOU ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR SAFETY
Hiking is a rewarding and pleasant activity in nature, but there are certain dangers you should be aware of. Those include, but are not limited to, trip and fall injuries, bee stings, poison oak exposure, ticks, snake bites, mountain lions or wildlife. By signing up for this event, you agree to hold harmless the hike organizer, assistant organizers and other participants for any injuries sustained during this hike***