addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

discuss House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski at Amelia's Bistro

  • Jan 20, 2013 · 11:30 AM
  • This location is shown only to members

Location TBD, somewhere in downtown Jersey City.

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski

Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/House-Leaves-Mark-Z-Danielewski/dp/0375703764

Review from Publishers Weekly
Danielewski's eccentric and sometimes brilliant debut novel is really two novels, hooked together by the Nabokovian trick of running one narrative in footnotes to the other. One-the horror story-is a tour-de-force. Zampano, a blind Angelino recluse, dies, leaving behind the notes to a manuscript that's an account of a film called The Navidson Report. In the Report, Pulitzer Prize-winning news photographer Will Navidson and his girlfriend move with their two children to a house in an unnamed Virginia town in an attempt to save their relationship. One day, Will discovers that the interior of the house measures more than its exterior. More ominously, a closet appears, then a hallway. Out of this intellectual paradox, Danielewski constructs a viscerally frightening experience. Will contacts a number of people, including explorer Holloway Roberts, who mounts an expedition with his two-man crew. They discover a vast stairway and countless halls. The whole structure occasionally groans, and the space reconfigures, driving Holloway into a murderous frenzy. The story of the house is stitched together from disparate accounts, until the experience becomes somewhat like stumbling into Borges's Library of Babel. This potentially cumbersome device actually enhances the horror of the tale, rather than distracting from it. Less successful, however, is the second story unfolding in footnotes, that of the manuscript's editor, (and the novel's narrator), Johnny Truant. Johnny, who discovered Zampano's body and took his papers, works in a tattoo parlor. He tracks down and beds most of the women who assisted Zampano in preparing his manuscript. But soon Johnny is crippled by panic attacks, bringing him close to psychosis. In the Truant sections, Danielewski attempts an Infinite Jest-like feat of ventriloquism, but where Wallace is a master of voices, Danielewski is not. His strength is parodying a certain academic tone and harnessing that to pop culture tropes. Nevertheless, the novel is a surreal palimpsest of terror and erudition, surely destined for cult status. (Mar.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

book suggestion by Ab.

Category: Fiction - Suspense - Horror - Literary

Join or login to comment.

  • Sue C

    running 5-10 mins late, see you there soon!

    January 20, 2013

  • Sue C

    Sorry, belated happy new year all!
    This book is not for everybody for sure. Its not for me... I think it would make a good horror movie, but in book form ... anyway, I'll reserve the rest of my comments.

    January 14, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I'm sorry guys. I just realized I will be out of town this weekend. Hope to see you guys next month, going to get a head start on the Recognitions now :)

    January 14, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I also just got this book but unfortunately there is now a conflict for that Sunday. happy new year to everyone & look forward to getting into this book regardless of not being able to attend. Enjoy and look forward to seeing you again in the near future. Vidya

    January 8, 2013

  • BARBARA

    So I sucked it up and bought this....not sure how much I can read before the meetup, but it really is quite intriguing. It will not be a straightfoward experience but I'm compelled to understand what the author is trying to accomplish.....

    January 7, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Just got to borrowing this book from the library. Wow, this one looks like it'll be an interesting, long read. It makes sense that it isn't in ebook form, considering the typography and usage of white space seems to be incredibly important to this book.

    December 7, 2012

  • Sue C

    Seems not published in ebook. I bought a copy from Barnes & Nobles - $21, large paperback 7 by 9 by 1.3 ". Then I realize its MUCH cheaper on Amazon - $12.23 so if buying I recommend that instead. I can lend my copy to someone in Dec.

    When I opened it I got the feeling like its going to be a trip. Its non-linear, the words are sometimes in shapes, there is a bit of color and looks like some puzzles. Here are some photos as a preview: http://www.meetup.com/Jersey-City-Brunch-Book-Club-meetup/photos/all_photos/?photoAlbumId=11838562

    November 19, 2012

  • Sue C

    Wired article: How Not To Read House of Leaves: http://www.wired.com/table_of_malcontents/2007/02/how_not_to_read/

    November 19, 2012

5 went

  • Sue C
    Event Host
  • A former member
  • A former member
  • A former member

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy