What we're about

This is a group for anyone interested in books, big ideas, and good conversations.

Anyone is welcome. I started this group to meet other people who may be interested in exploring new ideas or engaging challenging questions. I also look forward to engaging new compelling stories, and fiction, that draws out interesting thoughts, themes, and discussions.

Looking forward to exploring books and life with you!

Upcoming events (5)

Killing Mr. Griffin / Topic: Murder Mystery, Thriller

Killing Mr. Griffin is a 1978 suspense novel written by Lois Duncan about a group of teenage students at a New Mexico high school who plan to kidnap their strict English teacher, Mr. Griffin. Let's just say, things don't go according to plan! Lois Duncan is also known for writing the book that the hit film "I Know What You Did Last Summer" was based on! The Details: --> This group will only meet twice: Meeting 1 will discuss the first half of the book. Meeting 2 will discuss the second half of the book. --> This will be a fun group to jump into if you don't have a lot of time on your hands! The book is a quick, easy, and fun read. --> Each week we will discuss plot, characters, themes, and predictions of where the book is going... so try to go into it blind and without spoilers!! --> Don't forget to RSVP!

Man's Search For Meaning / Topic: Meaning of Life

Man’s Search for Meaning is an autobiographical account of Viktor Frankl’s application of his trademark theory, which he called “Logotherapy.” He began formulating this theory, which posits that the search for meaning and purpose in life is the key to personal happiness and well-being, in Vienna, Austria, before the dawn of Nazi aggression. Later, while imprisoned for three years in first a Nazi ghetto and then Nazi concentration camps, he applied his theory to his own immediate situation, to console himself and his fellow prisoners. Because he was Jewish, Frankl was arrested by Nazi German authorities in September 1942, along with his pregnant wife, his parents, and his brother. They were deported from their beloved Vienna and transported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in Czechoslovakia, where Frankl’s father died. Frankl and his remaining family members were next transported to Auschwitz in Poland, where all of them, except Frankl, died. At the time of his arrest, Frankl was a well-regarded psychologist. He had already begun developing his theory of Logotherapy (literally, “meaning therapy”). Frankl carried his manuscript outlining his theory, titled The Doctor and the Soul, with him to Auschwitz. (It was slipped into a pocket sewed between the lining and the outer fabric of his overcoat.) At Auschwitz, in short order, Frankl was separated from his family and stripped of his clothing (including his overcoat, which contained his manuscript). The Nazis even shaved all of his body hair off. Of this experience, Frankl wrote, “most of us were overcome by a grim sense of humor. We knew that we had nothing to lose except our ridiculously naked lives” (p. 16). As we engage this short little book, we will discuss Frankl's experiences and the hard question of the meaning of life! The Details: --> Each week we will meet and discuss about 40 pages. Our first week we will discuss the first 40 pages of the book. --> The book is pretty short, so don't be intimidated by it. --> As you read, make some notes of what jumps out at you, or what aspects of the book that you are really chewing on. --> Don't forget to RSVP

Man's Search For Meaning / Topic: Meaning of Life

Man’s Search for Meaning is an autobiographical account of Viktor Frankl’s application of his trademark theory, which he called “Logotherapy.” He began formulating this theory, which posits that the search for meaning and purpose in life is the key to personal happiness and well-being, in Vienna, Austria, before the dawn of Nazi aggression. Later, while imprisoned for three years in first a Nazi ghetto and then Nazi concentration camps, he applied his theory to his own immediate situation, to console himself and his fellow prisoners. Because he was Jewish, Frankl was arrested by Nazi German authorities in September 1942, along with his pregnant wife, his parents, and his brother. They were deported from their beloved Vienna and transported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in Czechoslovakia, where Frankl’s father died. Frankl and his remaining family members were next transported to Auschwitz in Poland, where all of them, except Frankl, died. At the time of his arrest, Frankl was a well-regarded psychologist. He had already begun developing his theory of Logotherapy (literally, “meaning therapy”). Frankl carried his manuscript outlining his theory, titled The Doctor and the Soul, with him to Auschwitz. (It was slipped into a pocket sewed between the lining and the outer fabric of his overcoat.) At Auschwitz, in short order, Frankl was separated from his family and stripped of his clothing (including his overcoat, which contained his manuscript). The Nazis even shaved all of his body hair off. Of this experience, Frankl wrote, “most of us were overcome by a grim sense of humor. We knew that we had nothing to lose except our ridiculously naked lives” (p. 16). As we engage this short little book, we will discuss Frankl's experiences and the hard question of the meaning of life! The Details: --> Each week we will meet and discuss about 40 pages. Our first week we will discuss the first 40 pages of the book. --> The book is pretty short, so don't be intimidated by it. --> As you read, make some notes of what jumps out at you, or what aspects of the book that you are really chewing on. --> Don't forget to RSVP

Man's Search For Meaning / Topic: Meaning of Life

Man’s Search for Meaning is an autobiographical account of Viktor Frankl’s application of his trademark theory, which he called “Logotherapy.” He began formulating this theory, which posits that the search for meaning and purpose in life is the key to personal happiness and well-being, in Vienna, Austria, before the dawn of Nazi aggression. Later, while imprisoned for three years in first a Nazi ghetto and then Nazi concentration camps, he applied his theory to his own immediate situation, to console himself and his fellow prisoners. Because he was Jewish, Frankl was arrested by Nazi German authorities in September 1942, along with his pregnant wife, his parents, and his brother. They were deported from their beloved Vienna and transported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in Czechoslovakia, where Frankl’s father died. Frankl and his remaining family members were next transported to Auschwitz in Poland, where all of them, except Frankl, died. At the time of his arrest, Frankl was a well-regarded psychologist. He had already begun developing his theory of Logotherapy (literally, “meaning therapy”). Frankl carried his manuscript outlining his theory, titled The Doctor and the Soul, with him to Auschwitz. (It was slipped into a pocket sewed between the lining and the outer fabric of his overcoat.) At Auschwitz, in short order, Frankl was separated from his family and stripped of his clothing (including his overcoat, which contained his manuscript). The Nazis even shaved all of his body hair off. Of this experience, Frankl wrote, “most of us were overcome by a grim sense of humor. We knew that we had nothing to lose except our ridiculously naked lives” (p. 16). As we engage this short little book, we will discuss Frankl's experiences and the hard question of the meaning of life! The Details: --> Each week we will meet and discuss about 40 pages. Our first week we will discuss the first 40 pages of the book. --> The book is pretty short, so don't be intimidated by it. --> As you read, make some notes of what jumps out at you, or what aspects of the book that you are really chewing on. --> Don't forget to RSVP

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