Past Meetup

WordPress site speed and responsive design

This Meetup is past

87 people went

Location visible to members

Details

You can RSVP for the meetup here, but please, please, don't forget to sign up through the Skills Matter website (http://skillsmatter.com/event-details/home/wordpress-speed/js-3331) to attend.

What's been happening in Wordpress

Chris Adams gives a quick round up of the stories in and around the Wordpress community since the last meetup.

Bio

Chris Adams is the Clients and Communities Developer at AMEE and environmental data startup in London, and has been working with Ruby on Rails and Wordpress since 2006, and been the joint organiser of the Wordpress London meetup group since summer 2010.

Responsive Design and Wordpress - Mark Mitchell

Responsive Design is a complete rethink of design for the web: a methodology for development that focuses on the ways a website can adapt to a range of screen sizes and device types. What is Wordpress doing to make their platform responsive? What steps can you take towards creating a fluid and consistent experience?

Bio

Mark Mitchell is a Senior Designer and Developer at Headshift | Dachis Group. Mark is interested in the entire process of realising a concept; defining, designing and building solutions with an unwavering focus on the user experience. He has a particular fondness for Wordpress.

Scaling WordPress - Peter Westwood

An overview of the different techniques for scaling WordPress

Bio

Peter Westwood (http://westi.wordpress.com/) has been using WordPress since 2004, is a WordPress.org Lead Developer (http://profiles.wordpress.org/users/westi/) and works as a Happiness Gardener (http://blog.ftwr.co.uk/archives/2010/08/23/switching-from-manual-to-automattic/) for Automattic (http://automattic.com/about/), the company that runs WordPress.com, Akismet, Polldaddy, VaultPress, Gravatar, and much more. He loves food, drink, photography, and classic cars but will often be found basking in the glow of a computer screen whilst trying to resolve an obscure bug.