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Los Angeles Urban Chicken Enthusiasts Message Board › Roundworm infestation in yard for my free ranging chickens

Roundworm infestation in yard for my free ranging chickens

vickie p.
user 21810341
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 68
all great responses and definitely needed to hear to confirm where i stand anyway. i am for the free ranging and love that they can have that life. i'm comfortable with doing a major clean up and staying more diligent with regard to raking up poop.

there will be no 3 inch scrape and yeah the doctor just covering herself. for now i'll give them this dewormer as i am seeing the worms in their poop and if not mistaken this may be the point where they need a little help getting over them...then from here on out i'll give them all of the things you all listed. i did the acv in the water but have gotten lazy with that, so mad at myself.

thanks for the advice, going forward as natural as possible and as chill as possible.

do any of you also put de in their food and coop? i bought a big bag and thoroughly cleaned the coop with a nice layer of de underneath their shavings. :) :)
Roberta K.
user 10948851
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 581
I see a lot of chicken poop and i'm trying to document the different kinds with pictures. A month ago I saw what I think was a worm in Peanut's poop and freaked out and bought wormers, etc. And then when they arrived a couple of days later, it freaked me out to see the bottles and I couldn't give it to her. In that time I checked each poop and couldn't find any more. So at least in that case it was an isolated incident I think.
Laura B.
LauraBonilla
Group Organizer
Norco, CA
Post #: 528

do any of you also put de in their food and coop? i bought a big bag and thoroughly cleaned the coop with a nice layer of de underneath their shavings. :) :)
I used to put it in their food, but only the organic food grade of course... but now, I don't even do that... I like the idea of daily carrots plus I always have turmeric and cayenne in their lay mash and grains...

I never put de in their water, I prefer putting ACV...

keep us posted!
Cynthia
bringer_o_treats
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 331
As far as DE in food or water - if I understand correctly, the theory of using DE is that it causes damage to an insect's exoskeleton, resulting in dehydration and death. For a parasite that is internal, I can't convince myself that the DE does anything except perhaps scour the hens intestines . . . and I think that shredded carrots are performing the same function, plus adding some nutrition in the process. Cheaper, too.

DE makes sense in a dust bathing situation, since it would stay dry.

Please correct me if I got any of that wrong.
Laura B.
LauraBonilla
Group Organizer
Norco, CA
Post #: 530
totally agree, Cynthia... and thanks for the clarification - I do use it for dusting them too - I make sure it's the food grade too, so that it is safer to breathe than the cheap version they use for swimming pools' filters... NOT the same! I think it's worth mentioning...
JJ
user 80252532
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 39
I've read livestock management practices that basically rotate the areas on which the livestock pasture, or in this case free-ranged chickens. The principle is to remove the chickens for a period of time so the life-cycle of the pest is depleted before the chickens come back.
vickie p.
user 21810341
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 69
Hi JJ, i'm glad you brought this up because how can you rotate this "area" if you have only a small back yard. i have alot of books and have read this bit of advice in them as well. But I've always scratched my head and thought but what if you don't have room for that and they free range rather than go around in a chicken tractor? how long can your yard handle the constant life of 3 or so.

i've also started noting which plants are left alone and am starting to grow some things for them to eat...also researching and planning ways to keep things interesting, have a beautiful yard, and happy girls. i bought the chicken gardens book and that had some interesting ideas.

russian sage, lavender, rosemary, mint, daisies, lemon balm, potted impatiens, palm all seem to be something they leave alone. ahh i suppose this is a very on going thing, always learning. Are any of you growing plants for your chickens to eat? any suggestions? sprouts perhaps? something fast and easy would be great.

thanks for all of your wonderful posts, i was very worried but am completely at ease going forward especially with the shredded carrots advice, i hope they like it! going to give them some right now.
Laura B.
LauraBonilla
Group Organizer
Norco, CA
Post #: 537
hi Vickie,
I have planted sage, lavender, rosemary, and different type of mints... They love to be under those bushes and do leave them alone... absolutely love when I hold one up and they smell rosemary... I want to plant more because it's lots easier and looks fresher than even lavender, which is bit more delicate...but forget mint... they devour it... does not survive... So I relocated peppermint/mints to inside the veggie area (enclosed) so that I can give it to them and have some for me... it's a weed so goes everyone if you let it, but around chickens it just dies - at least it's my experience...

I also planning to have patches of sod in each of my sub-groups but cover it with a little elevated panel of hardware cloth so that they can only eat standing on top of the hardware cloth, so that it survives - otherwise, it just does not take hold.

They also love to be under bugainvillea. They eat some leaves and some flowers but not enough to kill it (once it is established, otherwise it does not stand a chance)

I have tomatoes plants around the property and they may pick at a leave here and there but leave them totally alone for the most part... and the tomatoes are for them, so I don't mind if they get peck at

vickie p.
user 21810341
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 70
Laura, i LOVE your sod idea!!! and bouganvillia suggestion...those are tough plants and a good choice for the yard. they do ADORE my mint, it was a voluteer so i don't care and in a nasty corner. but i find them there all the time. it seems to survive somehow. i am determined to have my yard back, i've been reading chicken gardens book.

tell me, do you let your chickens pick through and rotate your compost piles? i wondered since i throw their poo in there if that's where Isabella got the "out of control" roundworm. i say out of control because i started to see the nasty worm in the poo, bout an inch and a half.
JJ
user 80252532
Los Angeles, CA
Post #: 42
Does anyone know of a commercial source for sod that is free of pesticides?
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