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Los Angeles Urban Chicken Enthusiasts Message Board › RIP Little chicken. I lost her but will learn from the experience. I hope...

RIP Little chicken. I lost her but will learn from the experience. I hope...

MaryEllen S.
user 13593726
Altadena, CA
Post #: 35
I think that Albon will treat e. coli, but am not sure. I try not to over-medicate, but my recent experiences seem to tell me that treating anything that crops up as aggressively and as quickly as possible seems to be the best course, rather than holding back and trying other remedies before going to medications. I think my reluctance to treat my birds with a strong medication may have made things worse. It's so hard to know. I flailed around for a while trying different things to treat the flock but now I wish I had started taking fecals into the vet as soon as I saw that slight drop in weight. My Nice Chicken got tangled up in the goat's feet and got a broken leg, and when I took her into the vet for that, the vet mentioned that she was a little underweight. I wish now that I had thought about that more seriously and spent some time checking the rest of the flock, but I just figured that she had lost a bit of weight due to being in pain from the leg. I had not noticed that a few others had gotten thin, because they lost weight gradually, and also many of my chickens are fluffy types, so the only way to really tell is to pick them up and feel for the breastbone. I finally noticed that my cochin Pear Tree, who is normally about the size and shape of a basketball, had shrunk considerably. Red Sky was a fluffy mixed breed and had never been very big, so with her it was impossible to tell. I was led astray though, because LaDonna had told me that she laid a particular egg, and it turned out that another chicken I got from her was laying that egg. So I thought she was laying successfully when she was not - that's why I did not think she could be egg bound. Once I got my hands on her and felt her, I knew what was happening. But the necropsy also showed that it was a chronic problem (I forget the name of the condition) that had become acute, and then there was the cancerous ovary. If it had not been for that I might have tried to cure her, but she was not going to make it without a complete spay, and I did not think she would survive the surgery. The vet agreed with me. And, not to be harsh, but by that time, what with Nice Chicken's broken leg and all that I had already done for Red Sky... it had gotten well up over $1000 and I just could not afford it. As it is I am paying $30 per fecal to try to track down the source of the cocci. I just want to make sure that everyone that needs stronger medication gets it, to beat the infection down to a manageable level before dropping back to doing a periodic fecal exam from the flock at large to see what's happening. Thank goodness Red Sky did not show any signs of Marek's in the autopsy, and none of my flock have shown any symptoms.

But, mourning over what
Brandi G
user 48566262
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 337
Mary Ellen,
I really appreciate your perspective. I generally fall into the same category, only treat when necessary. Lately, I've been reconsidering that course. I like your idea of taking fecal samples into the vet. Do you have one that will do that for you? I'd consider trying it. I just found that rotten vet who wanted to see all my chickens at several hundred bucks each and got totally disillusioned. I mean, really, what was she thinking? I may have been more open to it if she knew anything about chickens, but she was a bird vet and had some pretty screwy chicken info.

I like the idea of finding if each bird has an issue, a few of mine seem a little less thick than they were before. I did reduce the food intake slightly, they were seeming "fat" for a while and when I lost my Claire to fatty liver, I became aware of that. I want to mke sure everyone is ok and that I kill anything LaDonna so kindly gave me...

Anyway, thanks for sharing and if you have the name of the vet that will do fecal samples, I'd love to get that info. Especially since you are pretty near me!

Since I only have five, I could probably gather individual samples pretty easily. Let me know, and thanks again. It really does help to discuss this stuff, and to know that you have others out there with a simar experience.
Vickie
Spinster_Sister
Hawthorne, CA
Post #: 262
I am sorry to read about your sweet girl, Little, and the turmoil that woman gave you and your girls. The same lab that performed the necropsy will also do a fecal float for you. Slightly different forms and you send them through the mail (or drive them to San Bernandino)...you can even call the lab and speak to one of the lead vets / co-directors and they will run other tests as well if you can be more precise. I met Dr Uzal in SB, and he took a look at what I brought in, asked me several questions and told me how to take care of the problem...Free!
Brandi G
user 48566262
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 339
Vickie

Cool. Thanks! I didn't know they did fecal floats also. Maybe I'll collect samples and mail them in. Did they give any specific directions on how to submit them or any specific paperwork?
MaryEllen S.
user 13593726
Altadena, CA
Post #: 36
oh, cool, I did not know that! I have three samples I was going to take in today. At $30 a pop, I would *love* to have it done for free! There is no lab very near me, are there directions on the website on what to send and where? (When I sent in Red Sky for her necropsy, I forgot to send the paperwork, can you believe it?! I was so embarrassed, but they called and I scanned and emailed it to them.)
Vickie
Spinster_Sister
Hawthorne, CA
Post #: 263
Sorry for the late reply Brandi, I've been very busy lately. Your best bet is to call the UCDavis lab directly, ask to speak to the lab vet for avian/poultry. I spoke to a wonder older woman vet (forgot her name) and she was very informative and told me exactly what to put on the standard intake form and to address it to her for testing. The fee was pretty low and said she would speak to me for further clarification after the results are in, above all she told me "NO TREATS"!! Grasses are the best treat they can have after their pellets. Be prepared to directly follow your girls first thing in the morning with a KFC individual side cup - perfect catch size container!!
I was told that the lab will do is mix the poops for the float, although she told me is not necessary to collect from each hen because if one shows parasites, they all have 'em. I am more paranoid that if I miss one hen's deposit - then THAT one hen will have something wrong that I will miss out on treating.
What I can tell you is that finding a local vet is vital....I know I push Dr Micco, but honestly she is a great vet, does house-calls and telephone consults. I tried the total organic method of treating, but have learned that western medical treatment - hard and fast - will give my girls a far better chance of beating almost any illness, however, organics, can help keep them healthier / stronger overall.
Did you know that it is VITAL not to give any calcium during antibiotic treatment? That no-no list includes Kale and of course, anything dairy (regardless of the probiotics), if you cannot stand not giving them calcium treats/supplements, then the absolute minimum of time spacing between meds and calcium is 3 hours.
Brandi G
user 48566262
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 340
So the final report came back on Little, it appears the intestines had Cocci and colostridium sp.
I probably should treat my flock for this since they probably all have it. Sadly, Baytril is the recommended medication, which is banned in poultry and is not a good thing, apparently. I wonder if anyone has had this and treated it successfully? There's a natural remedy called Biostrong 505 that is purported to work, but I haven't had luck finding it. Anyone heard of it or used it?

I have Corrid for the Cocci, but the colostridium is a new one for me.
Karen C.
user 83873082
Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA
Post #: 93
Why don't you call Dr. Micco and have a phone chat...
Vickie
Spinster_Sister
Hawthorne, CA
Post #: 264
I love Baytril, but Dr Micco cannot prescribe it anymore (something to do with the FDA banning it for "livestock"). I do know two vets that will prescribe it.

Dr Rosskopf in Hawthorne CA
4871 W Rosecrans Ave, Hawthorne, CA 90250
(310) 679-0693

Dr Janet Berens
22430 Ventura Blvd
Woodland Hills, CA 91364
(818) 225-7160

Ask your current vet or call Dr Micco, if TriMeth Sulfa will work for those illnesses...if they do, I would go with Dr Micco all the way! You can call her direct 310
Brandi G
user 48566262
Pasadena, CA
Post #: 341
Seems like Dr Micco is the way to go. I'm going to call her and see what she says.
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