addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupsimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Monthly Meeting

  • to
  • Farmington Community Library

    32737 West 12 Mile Road, Farmington Hills, MI (map)

    42.497856 -83.370773

  • We're on the second floor; if you come in the front door, hang a right and you'll see the stairs!
  • See our website for more details!

    We meet at 6:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at the Farmington Community Library.

    Topics Include:

    Lie & Die by Certificates 

    Certificates are a fundamental component of identity and network security in companies of any size. You're likely already using Certificates even if you didn't know it. Learn about PKI & Certificates, how Certificates can be used, why they are important, their security benefits, and how you can implement them. This mini introduction to PKI & Certificates is ideal for IT Sys Admins, DevOps Engineers, and Developers. 

    Mike Cooper is Founder & CEO of Revocent Inc. based in San Jose, California. He has 30+ years of development, IT, and management experience in small startups to Fortune 500. He has founded more than 5 technology and consumer companies, and was head of IT at another 3 startups. Mike started as a UNIX developer and System Admin more than 30 years ago. 

    Random Access Memories

    For the second part of the December Meeting we've devised a "Random Access Memories" panel discussion. This is a chance for folks to relate some of the things that we ran into as developers and systems administrators that didn't go quite according to plan:

    • The series of drives that you thought were a RAID 1, but were actually RAID 0.

    • The Watchmouse node that was located in a far-away region that would constantly trigger a pager warning for ping timeouts.

    • The time you thought DAT tape was a reliable backup medium.


    We've all had stories that have happened to us or our companies over the years and we'd like to take the latter-part of the December meeting to share these memories.

    As with any discussion, there are a few ground-rules we'd like to follow:

    1) We'll hand around an item of some form (old hard disk, or something that folks can pass around). The person that has it can tell their tale.

    2) Whomever has the item is the only one that can tell the tale. If
    someone else wants to interrupt with their variant they need to wait
    until they get the item in order to tell their version.

    3) Tales must be something the person experienced themselves. First-hand
    accounts are preferred, though the person doesn't have to be the one who
    initiated the problem, nor the one who fixed the problem.

    4) Hopefully the tale will have a satisfying solution, but tales where
    the solution was "we decommissioned it" are welcome.

    5) After the tale is complete there will be a brief period where we
    discuss the problem and the solution.

    6) The discussion should be constructive: telling people what they did
    was wrong and that "you should have" is not productive. We've all been
    in situations where things were obvious outside of the crisis period.

    7) This is intended to be a fun sharing time with some "lessons
    learned". Berating people for what they or their organizations  did in
    the past helps no-one.

    8) The moderator will interrupt conversations that violate these rules.
    Again, this is a place of sharing, not a place where we criticize the
    past.

    Hoping this gets you excited to share some of your tales.

    (Oh, and by the way? Those examples at the top? Those were all from Craig Maloney's own experience. )

    Plus we'll have our regular features: Jobs Looking for People, People Looking for Jobs, and much more! We'll also be meeting for dinner at Red Lobster in Novi after the meeting. 


Join or login to comment.

Want to go?

Join and RSVP

14 going

  • James
    Board Member, Co-Organizer,
    Event Host

    I can be found working on tech problems at home, work and on the go using open source when possible

  • sharan
    Board Member Emeritus, Co-Organizer,
    Event Host

    Long time UNIX and open source enthusiast. One of the original co-founders of the group [masked]... more

  • Jim M.
    Board Member, Co-Organizer,
    Event Host

    Software developer, founder of LTSP.org, President of Avairis, Inc.

  • Gibson N.
    Board Member, Co-Organizer,
    Event Host

    Computer and technology interest me. I also like Ford Mustangs. I'm an Ford IT employee working... more

  • Craig M.
    Board Member, Organizer,
    Event Host

    Just another random Linux hacker

  • Brian W.

    After a long time being a non-embedded software engineer, I am now an embedded software... more

  • joe a.

    I'm a linux sysadmin by trade, however I wear a generalist admin hat at my workplace.

Our Sponsors

  • A2 Hosting

    The mug.org website is proudly hosted by A2 Hosting

  • Atomic Object

    Atomic Object is a MUG meeting sponsor!

  • Avairis

    Avairis is a MUG meeting sponsor!

  • O'Reilly

    O’Reilly graciously provides us review books and a group discount code.

  • Penguicon

    Penguicon is a MUG meeting sponsor!

  • Pearson / InformIT

    Visit their site for a special discount code on books and video training

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy