• Permaculture (and Co-Living!) Sites in the Pacific NW - by Jan Spencer + guests

    [Note from Sherri: Jan will be talking about + showing images of all these interesting places. I have added more details on some of the Portland ones, since they may be less well known to a Eugene audience. You can google the Eugene ones if you have not heard of them -- all are amazing! Our group will be invited to a potluck dinner at Duma sometime in late Nov or Dec.] EUGENE 1. East Blair Housing Cooperative, near 4th + Blair in the Whiteaker neighborhood. Established by dedicated folks in 1982 + still providing low-cost housing to 35-40 people, including a dozen kids. 2. Maitreya Ecovillage, 885 Almaden. A wide range of dwellings on five city tax lots, including a house, triplex, strawbale community room, tiny house, outdoor kitchen, meditation room, cob guest cottage 3. Duma Community, 2244 Alder. Nine people share a 10BR house built in 1920s as a home for wayward youth, with extensive gardens out back + chickens. PORTLAND N Street Kailash Ecovillage (rentals) 4311 SE 37th Avenue http://www.kailashecovillage.org About 50 residents in 30 1BR, two 2BR, and rooms in a house (http://www.kailashecovillage.org/rooms). Columbia Ecovillage (cohousing) 4647 NE Killingsworth Street http://columbiaecovillage.org The 37 homes are in a 1970s apartment complex, renovated in 2008 for energy efficiency and healthy air quality. (The smallest unit is 500sf, which isn't microhousing but is quite small for cohousing.) _________________________ This event is part of a series. Here is a quick look at the remaining presentations. All take place at the River Road Rec Center, 1400 Lake Drive: Tuesday, Dec 3, 6:30-8pm Pushing back on cars - reclaim car space for bikes and pedestrians: Critical mass, parking day, parklets, community plazas, superblocks. Eugene, NYC, Freiberg, Barcelona Tuesday, Dec 17, 6:30-8pm Allies, assets, actions for regime change: Lifestyle, economics, culture, community. Also of related interest - Podcasts of Jan's radio program https://player.whooshkaa.com/shows/creating-a-resilient-future

  • Info session on more-affordable small houses in Eugene via Community Land Trust

    From https://www.facebook.com/devnorthwest/photos/rpp.845770665765524/994006530941936/?type=3&theater DevNW is excited to announce plans for Community Land Trust homes in west Eugene! At 5220 Royal Avenue, DevNW is planning a subdivision of affordable homes to help families achieve their dream of owning a home in Eugene. DevNW will be hosting community meetings to discuss the project and engage the community. Come and see site plans, ask questions, and learn how one of these homes can become yours! Join us for a community meeting: • Wednesday, November 6th at Prairie Mountain School in the Caforium from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM. • Tuesday, November 12th at 5220 Royal Avenue (outdoors and on site) from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM. • Wednesday, November 13th at Prairie Mountain School in the Caforium I asked DevNW if they might be tiny houses. They said no, but: You ll be pleased to know that we are not pursuing a traditional housing model. These homes will range between around 575 SF for a one-bedroom and around 1,200 SF for a three-bedroom. They are what is called Community Land Trust (CLT) homes, which is where the land is legally separated from the home and placed in a trust, which is run by a nonprofit (DevNW). The structure is similar to a condo, except the HOA is the nonprofit. This keeps the homes affordable while allowing the buyers to retain full ownership of their home. The tiny-home model is not something that DevNW will be pursuing for this particular project since we are already slated to submit our tentative subdivision design after these community meetings. With that said, I will keep MicroDwellers in mind and let our development director know about your note as we build out our portfolio. Lots more info on CLTs here: https://groundedsolutions.org/strengthening-neighborhoods/community-land-trusts If this night isnt good for you, there is another info session the night before, Tues, 5:30-6:30pm. Same time but the venue is the site itself, 5220 Royal Ave. See flyer in Facebook link above.

  • Volunteer fair to help homelessness groups @ Eugene Public Library downtown

    Eugene Public Library - Downtown

    If you have been wondering how you can best help our unhoused neighbors, especially with winter upon us ... the Eugene Public Library is stepping up to assist in channeling your energy. From the library: https://www.eugene-or.gov/Calendar.aspx?EID=20722&month=11&year=2019&day=10&calType=0 Concerned about unhoused community members? Looking for a way to help? Meet representatives of local nonprofits and government agencies addressing these issues, find out about their services, and learn about volunteer opportunities and other ways to support their work. Author Connie King Leonard will read from her young adult novel "Sleeping in My Jeans." [This is a terrific novel written in the voice of a teenage girl whose family becomes homeless in Eugene. It is published by Ooligan Press, the student-run press at Portland State University. --Sherri] Participating organizations include Catholic Community Services, Centro Latino Americano, City of Eugene, Community Court, Egan Warming Center, Eugene Mission, Food for Lane County, Hosea Youth Services, Lane County Health and Human Services, Looking Glass, ShelterCare, SquareOne Villages, St. Vincent de Paul, White Bird Clinic, Willamette Family Inc., and Womenspace.

  • Sunday night vegetarian potluck dinner at Walnut Street Co-op

    The nice folks at Walnut Street Co-op, near the UO and Hendricks Park, have invited us to share dinner with them. Bring a vegetarian dish to share, and come get a closer look at co-op living. From https://www.ic.org/directory/walnut-street-co-op: Walnut Street Co-op is a social-change-oriented cooperative household. In September 2000 we moved into a large, rambling house together, seeking to build community. Three years later we formed a legal co-op, funding the project with many small loans from like-minded individuals. As housemates, we eat dinner together, share chores, attend house meetings and work parties, and have a basic commitment to resolve conflicts. We trust that each person holds a piece of the truth, and we are committed to deep listening with each other. Over time we’re finding that our friendships are deepening and a shared vision is emerging based on creating shifts in society toward dialogue, deliberation, and integration of diverse viewpoints. Co-op resident Emily says: We are multi-generational at present; our ages range from 23 to 72. The dominant age groups fluctuate over time depending on who's in the house, but we generally have a pretty good diversity of people here. You can join us at 6:15, and we can give you a tour before starting dinner around 6:30. I have added this to our calendar and let our members know. We'll have cards for you to note if the dish contains gluten, dairy, etc. Blog: https://walnutstcoop.wordpress.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/walnutstcoop Transit: The Co-op is conveniently located a few blocks from the EmX Walnut Station. For the EmX schedule (it runs every 15 mins), click the Sunday tab here: https://www.ltd.org/system-map/route_103

  • New edition of “Flora of the Pacific Northwest“ (a Native Plant Society talk)

    This talk, by a Seattle friend of mine, is presented by the local chapter of the Native Plant Society. David is a great guy, and the talk is free and open to the public. If you are interested in the topic, come out + help give him a warm Eugene welcome :) --Sherri ______________________ David Giblin, PhD, is the lead editor and co-author of the 826-page second edition of the “Flora of the Pacific Northwest,“ based on the original manual published in 1973 by C. Leo Hitchcock and Arthur Cronquist -- a seminal work of Pacific Northwest botany. David’s description of his talk: Neither a region’s flora nor the science of vascular plant taxonomy is static. In the 40 years since publication, significant changes have occurred to the region’s flora (e.g., discovery of new species, arrival of additional non-native species) and to the classification and naming of the taxa. At the time of publication of the first edition, users of the book could arrive at a currently accepted name for nearly all taxa within the region with the illustrated keys provided. In 2013, when we began revising the book, those same keys achieved a similar result for only 41% of the region's taxa. In this talk I will provide background information about Hitchcock and Cronquist; explain the approaches used to produce “Flora,“ 2nd edition; introduce the people involved; and summarize the changes between the two editions. ________________________ Speaker bio: David is collections manager and research botanist at the University of Washington Herbarium of the Burke Museum of Natural History. His research focus is the distribution and diversity of the Pacific Northwest vascular plant flora. He is a co-author of the Washington Wildflowers and Idaho Wildflowers identification apps, and of wildflower guides to the Olympic Mountains and Mount Rainier. He serves as a board member and taxon editor for the Flora of North America Project. He holds a master's degree in plant ecology from the University of Washington, and a PhD in plant evolutionary biology from the University of Missouri. More info on the book: The original 730-page book was designed by the authors to be a portable plant identification manual for professional and amateur botanists. The second edition has been fully updated to include all native and naturalized taxa presently known from the region, with up-to-date nomenclature and classifications, while maintaining the original's familiar layout, styles, and use of illustrated keys. Work on the second edition took five years and cost $500K. The completed “Flora“ covers 159 families, 1,141 genera, and 5,335 terminal taxa. Web page: http://www.pnwherbaria.org/florapnw.php Davids talk is presented by the Native Plant Society, Emerald Chapter: http://emerald.npsoregon.org

  • Tiny House Village Meetup group's monthly community potluck

    We support & admire the diligent work of this group, which is planning a tiny-house village within the urban growth boundary of Lane County, with access to transit and bike trails. They have developed an extensive mission/vision and are searching for others who would like to be members of the village. They have adopted sociocracy as their mode of governance. Our member Fred is heading up their land use & construction circle + would welcome more volunteers! They have a community potluck on the 4th Friday of every month, 7-9pm, and anyone interested in becoming a member or serving as a resource is welcome to attend. Plates, cups, and utensils are provided; bring a food or beverage item to share. The McNail-Riley House is on a corner across from the Lane County Fairgrounds; parking lot entrance on Jefferson Street. Best to RSVP directly on their page, so you will be notified if there are any changes: https://www.meetup.com/Tiny-Houses-and-Tiny-House-Villages/events Some of the broad areas they would welcome help with: * Land use & construction * Membership * Outreach * Community relationships * Business & finance Historic structure note: The McNail-Riley house was built in 1889 on 10th and Mill Street for Amanda McNail, who operated her colorful millinery shop "The Temple of Fashion" there. It then was moved to the southeast corner of Willamette and Broadway, and finally was moved to this site and carefully renovated.

  • Holiday tour of OpportUNITY Village Eugene, transitional housing (60-80sf)

    This was the original precursor to Emerald Village Eugene -- tiny basic wooden structures (and some Conestoga huts) on borrowed City land in west Eugene. Opportunity Village opened in August 2013 as a "transitional micro-housing" pilot project. The vision was to create a collaboration between the housed and unhoused that provides stable and safe places to be through cost-effective, human-scale approaches for transitioning the unhoused to more sustainable living situations. It accommodates 30 otherwise unhoused individuals and couples at a time in simple, micro-housing that provides residents with security, stability, and privacy. The compact homes (60-80sf) are supported by common cooking, restroom, and gathering facilities. The homes were built by volunteers and the residents themselves. Each home is composed of a set of 4'x8' modular panels, making assembly simple and quick. Start-up costs for the village were funded with around $98,000 in private cash donations, plus an estimated $114,000 of in-kind materials and labor. The Village is self-governed, meaning residents use democratic process to make decisions about how the community is operated and managed. A contract with the City of Eugene regulates how the site may be used, and a Community Agreement and Village Manual outlines internal policies and procedures. SquareOne Villages provides ongoing oversight and support. Read more about the work of SquareOne (now well into constructing a new village of 13 permanent tiny homes in Cottage Grove) + see the site layout here: https://www.squareonevillages.org/opportunity Consider becoming a Village Sustainer ($5 or more per month), and/or gifting Sustainer status to your loved ones for the holidays. What better gift for folks who have everything? Tour limited to 6 to avoid overwhelming the villagers.

  • Our December social hour! Come chat about ADUs + other small affordable housing

    Encouraging to meet so many great folks at our November social hour! In December we will meet in the back room at Viking Braggot Southtowne on Willamette, which has enough space for us all to introduce ourselves, then chat in small groups about common interests + questions. We will have knowledgeable folks there to guide + advise each group. Depending on attendees interests, the small-group topics will include building an inexpensive ADU, finding an affordable room of ones own, downsizing, connecting to the local tiny-house movement, and folks with land + folks who want land -- to name just some of the issues that brought so many new people to our November social hour. Feel free to bring friends! We will share the photos/descriptions/plans for affordable ADU and garage conversions that we have gathered. We also keep a photo album on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/MicroDwellers/photos/?tab=album&album_id=147495859958862 If you have some, please bring them, or send them to us! Sherri will share materials gathered at the Build Small Live Large Summit (www.buildsmall-livelarge.com) in Portland in November. You can now follow MicroDwellers on Instagram and Facebook; search for @microdwellers. Sherri blogs at www.RedefiningHome.org. Public transit options to the venue: LTD routes #24, 82. LTD Trip Planner: https://www.ltd.org/ ------------- If you have specific questions related to small-scale living, let us know in the Comments so we can try to bring resources (people, books, websites, etc.) that can help. Note: For those who just want to attend the first part of the social hour, longtime River Road permaculturist + MicroDwellers member Jan Spencer will give a free talk on reducing car use this same night, at 6:30-8pm at the River Road Rec Center, 1400 Lake Drive. He will discuss the Critical Mass phenomenon, Park(ing) Day, parklets, community plazas, and superblocks, showing examples in Eugene, NYC, Freiberg, and Barcelona. Public transit options to River Road: LTD routes 51, 52, and 55.

  • Tiny House Village Meetup group's monthly community potluck

    We support & admire the diligent work of this group, which is planning a tiny-house village within the urban growth boundary of Lane County, with access to transit and bike trails. They have developed an extensive mission/vision and are searching for others who would like to be members of the village. They have adopted sociocracy as their mode of governance. Our member Fred is heading up their land use & construction circle + would welcome more volunteers! They have a community potluck on the 4th Friday of every month, 7-9pm, and anyone interested in becoming a member or serving as a resource is welcome to attend. Plates, cups, and utensils are provided; bring a food or beverage item to share. The McNail-Riley House is on a corner across from the Lane County Fairgrounds; parking lot entrance on Jefferson Street. Best to RSVP directly on their page, so you will be notified if there are any changes: https://www.meetup.com/Tiny-Houses-and-Tiny-House-Villages/events Some of the broad areas they would welcome help with: * Land use & construction * Membership * Outreach * Community relationships * Business & finance Historic structure note: The McNail-Riley house was built in 1889 on 10th and Mill Street for Amanda McNail, who operated her colorful millinery shop "The Temple of Fashion" there. It then was moved to the southeast corner of Willamette and Broadway, and finally was moved to this site and carefully renovated.

  • TENTATIVE -- Density That (Some) People Hate Tour

    Needs a location

    [ETA: Just scheduled this to occur right before our January social hour. Maybe we will really do it. ... I like the term the League of Women Voters is using, compact urban development.] DATE IS TENTATIVE / A WORK IN PROGRESS I'm interested in seeing some of the higher-density projects that have faced opposition, to better understand why. We could have lunch afterward or during & discuss. ETA: The list grows ever longer; we may need to divide this into several tours. North Eugene: * Oakleigh Lane (future cohousing site; neighbors oppose): https://www.registerguard.com/article/20140923/NEWS/309239853 * Bascom Village, Park View Dr (affordable housing; neighbors hired an attorney to try to stop it): --https://www.registerguard.com/rg/news/local/27016745-75/housing-eugene-residents-development-project.html.csp --https://www.svdp.us/what-we-do/affordable-housing/rental-housing/completed-projects/bascom-village/ * Sponsors, W 14th & Oak Patch (54 apts for ex-prisoners, with supportive services): https://www.registerguard.com/rg/news/local/35269930-75/eugene-planning-commission-to-consider-neighbors-appeal-on-housing-project-for-ex-criminals.html.csp --Also: Sponsors broke ground in April on 10 tiny homes (at Elmira Road Iowa Street) for low-income individuals returning to Lane County post-incarceration. No controversy that I'm aware of. South Eugene: * Amazon Corner: apartment tours 9am-5pm weekdays (upscale apts w/retail, not microhousing) --https://www.registerguard.com/rg/opinion/35282357-78/a-test-for-density-in-eugene.html.csp --Neighbors wanted 3 stories only, had traffic concerns): https://southeastneighbors.org/2017/02/03/draft-southeast-neighbors-general-meeting-minutes-date-2217 * S Wmette Special Area Zone (abandoned after years of opposition): http://www.wecaneugene.org/south-willamette West Eugene: * Friendly Street Townhomes (had trouble getting financing so had to be built in two phases) Downtown: * Broadway Place Apartments, 255 W Broadway (170 apts, now Marin County-owned; also a 742[!]-unit garage): --https://www.pbs.org/video/pov-protest-in-downtown-eugene (over cutting trees down) --http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/692906/posts --https://www.registerguard.com/rg/news/local/34615415-75/eugenes-broadway-place-apartment-and-retail-development-sells-for-30-million.html.csp * 11th & Lincoln - 24-unit cohousing plans abandoned after several yrs: --http://special.registerguard.com/csp/cms/sites/web/business/17391136-41/story.csp --I have landowner contact * 13th & Olive (Capstone; 1,300 BRs in 375 units; now Singapore-owned): https://www.nrtoday.com/eugene-s-capstone-student-housing-complex-is-sold-to-singapore/article_456474da-a8d0-5d74-8a52-020fd8aca516.html * The 12-story(?!!) apts to replace Cafe Yumm on Bwy: https://www.registerguard.com/news/20190813/apartment-complex-planned-for-site-of-soon-to-close-cafxe9-yumm OTHER ISSUES Now owned by out-of-state firms * Ecco Apts, off River Road (192 units; now SF-owned): https://www.missionrockresidential.com/apartments/or/eugene/ecco/ * Boulders on the River apts, Goodpasture Island Rd (248 units; now SoCal-owned) * Skybox + Courtside student apts near Matthew Knight Arena (now Denver-owned) * 118-unit student apt complex west of UO (now Iowa-owned) Urban village: * Crescent Village, Coburg Road area: https://www.liveatcrescentvillage.com/Contact.aspx ()