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Burnsville Book Club - The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll... by Susan Jacoby

Join us for a fun evening as we discuss The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought by Susan Jacoby. Since the space is limited it is very important that you immediately update your RSVP status if you cannot attend. If there are people on the waiting list they will be automatically bumped up to the "Attending" category when others change their RSVP to "Not Attending".

The discussion begins at 7pm in the Davanni's "Party Room", but many of us arrive at 6:30 to have a little dinner. The evening usually concludes around 9pm after everyone has an opportunity to share their book recommendations and other ideas for group events.

From Amazon.com :

During the Gilded Age, which saw the dawn of America’s enduring culture wars, Robert Green Ingersoll was known as “the Great Agnostic.” The nation’s most famous orator, he raised his voice on behalf of  Enlightenment reason, secularism, and the separation of church and state with a vigor unmatched since America’s revolutionary generation. When he died in 1899, even his religious enemies acknowledged that he might have aspired to the U.S. presidency had he been willing to mask his opposition to religion. To the question that retains its controversial power today—was the United States founded as a Christian nation?—Ingersoll answered an emphatic no.

In this provocative biography, Susan Jacoby, the author of Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism, restores Ingersoll to his rightful place in an American intellectual tradition extending from Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine to the current generation of  “new atheists.” Jacoby illuminates the ways in which America’s often-denigrated and forgotten secular history encompasses issues, ranging from women’s rights to evolution, as potent and divisive today as they were in Ingersoll’s time. Ingersoll emerges in this portrait as one of the indispensable public figures who keep an alternative version of history alive. He devoted his life to that greatest secular idea of all—liberty of conscience belonging  to the religious and nonreligious alike.

Please come prepared with your ideas and suggestions for future book discussions!


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  • D. M.

    SORRY!!! I can't make it. Hopefully I can make it to another south of the river meet up... Sorry guys!

    March 6, 2013

  • Chuck13

    Work work work

    March 6, 2013

  • Samuel T.

    I'm an ex-pastor of many years turned Atheist. Would like to connect with like minded people:-)

    February 27, 2013

  • David

    Looking forward to this.

    February 5, 2013

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