• UGESTSU MONOGATARI (1953) by Kenji Mizoguchi

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place including social distancing and mask-wearing. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-09-27&perfix=3455 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) UGETSU MONOGATARI (1953, Japan, 96 min., 16mm, Eng. subtitles) Kenji Mizoguchi The threat of war looms like a fog over Lake Biwa. A thick graceful cloud moves to reveal the inimitable lighting of the great cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa who has worked often with Akira Kurosawa and the later films of Kenji Mizoguchi. On the soundtrack can be heard the traditionalist rustlings of unique composer Fumio Hayasaka, another who has worked with both Kurosawa and Mizoguchi. And on screen, a sort of floating ghost as played by Machiko Kyô, an actress of incredible presence that commands our attention as much here as she did in the role of Princess Rashômon a few years earlier. UGETSU is without a doubt the most formally perfect film of the Japanese post-war period. It represents a coming together of major artists at the height of their careers, beginning with Mizoguchi. This master of directing has created an extraordinarily ambitious film halfway between a tribute to Japanese esthetic tradition and the universally tragic (with part of the script based on a work by Guy de Mauspassant) It is at the juncture of these influences that we observe a small boat traversing the misty surface of lake Biwa with two men aboard who will face a cruel destiny costing them their honour and a great love. Torn between spirits and military aspirations, they desperately seek to quench a thirst for glory that may well cost them their loved ones. Unless they can find a way to pierce through the fog of war that has tainted their hearts. UGETSU will be presented as an English subtitled 16mm print which will help you better appreciate its timeless ghostly qualities which were a major influence on Japanese horror cinema which took hold there ten years later. Here then is the perfect opportunity to appreciate the panoramic wonder of Mizoguchi’s style and to realise the indelible impression it has left on world cinema history. - Mathieu Li-Goyette Guest speaker: Mathieu Li-Goyette is chief editor of the on-line magazine Panorama-cinéma and runs an Asian studies centre at Université de Montréal where he teaches history and theory of Japanese visual culture. He is presently working on a thesis dealing with desire and rhythm in comic books. Besides publishing articles in 24images, Hors Champs and Liberté, in 2010 he assembled a collection of works on humanism in post war Japan and in 2012 published a book on 100 years of Japan’s Nikkatsu film studio. He was also invited to program for Critics Week at the famed Berlin festival. Tickets availble here (not by cash) : https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-09-27&perfix=3455

  • ACTION: THE OCTOBER CRISIS OF 1970 by Robin Spry

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 109 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place. Tickets available from Sept. 27 on line at https://www.cinemadumusee.com/en/cineclub-film-society and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) ACTION: THE OCTOBER CRISIS OF 1970 (1974, Canada, 87 min., 16mm) Robin Spry This feature-length National Film Board documentary looks at those desperate days of October 1970 when Montreal awaited the outcome of FLQ terrorist acts. Using news reports and clips from the time, the film reflects upon the October Crisis and reveals the relief, outrage and defiance people felt when the Canadian army stepped in. Using a very detailed and objective approach to the subject, including his calm voice for narration, Robin Spry has very skillfully constructed a narrative as gripping as any top-rated political thriller. Unless you are of a certain generation, it is hard to appreciate the scope of events taking place that October. Just try to imagine all the panic, fear, dread and enforced rules of the present pandemic multiplied ten-fold… and without the ‘security’ of the internet or cell phones. Witness all the incredible drama as it unfolded day-by-day in this powerful documentary. It’s the closest thing to being there, 50 years later! Our esteemed guests were actively involved in the ‘Quiet Revolution’ for Québec’s independence at the time and will share with us their reflections and comments of that crucial period in our history. Guest speakers: TBA Tickets available on line starting September 27th at this address: https://www.cinemadumusee.com/en/cineclub-film-society Check out the whole series--> http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/

  • THE FOG (1980) by John Carpenter

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place including social distancing and mask-wearing. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-10-25&perfix=3451 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) THE FOG (1980, USA, 89 min., 35mm) John Carpenter Following the monstrous success of his previous film, HALLOWEEN, filmmaker John Carpenter returned two years later with another blood chilling shocker story. Residents of the small California coastal village of Antonio Bay become engulfed in a strange ocean fog that brings with it the ghosts of the crew of a 19th century naval crew of a ship that was intentionally sunk by the village founders to avoid the spread of leprosy. Thirsty for vengeance, the decrepit-looking spirits spread murderous terror amongst the townsfolk on the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking. Having an immersive soundscape and dark music track composed by Carpenter himself, the film is punctuated with excerpts from a radio station with an on air host played wonderfully by Adrienne Barbeau (SWAMP THING) You’ll definitely get that spooky feeling of not knowing what lies just a few feet in front of you, shrouded in a strange mist. Tom Atkins (HALLOWEEN III : SEASON OF THE WITCH), Jamie Lee Curtis (HALLOWEEN) and Janet Leigh (PSYCHO) also make up part of a cast that embodies authentic characters inhabiting a real seaside village cut off from the world. A mix of gothic chiller and violent slasher flick, there is something here for all tastes in horror from a legendary master of the genre. Come get lost in THE FOG with our special 40th anniversary screening. Projected as a gorgeous 35mm print from our archives, it showcases the superb cinematography of this true classic exactly as people saw it in 1980. To further get you in the mood for Halloween tricks, you’ll also be treated to vintage 35mm horror trailers from the 70s, 80s and 90s!

  • VAMPYR (1932) by Carl Dreyer with LIVE musicians

    Centre Cinéma Impérial

    CA$22.00

    With 800 seats, Cinéma Impérial can allow up to 250 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place including mandatory masks and social distancing. Tickets available soon be available on line at this site where you can also check out the entire fall series: http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/ VAMPYR with LIVE musicians on piano, cello and percussion. (Germany / France, 70 min. English subtitles) Carl Theodore Dreyer Carl Dreyer’s VAMPYR is a hauntingly atmospheric masterpiece of Scandinavian horror cinema. A trio of live musicians on piano, string and percussion will accompany a vintage film print projected onto a large screen in a beautiful movie temple built in 1913. Added will be a creepy surprise short. 1430 rue Bleury (metro logo) Place des Arts Stand by for details on where tickets can be purchased on line.

  • HIGH NOON (1952) by Stanley Kramer

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-11-08&perfix=3452 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) Check out the entire fall series: http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/ HIGH NOON (1952, USA, 85 min., 16mm) Stanley Kramer When the train station bell sounds at noon, newlywed marshal Will Kane understands that criminal Frank Miller is back in town, having sworn vengeance on this village and its marshal. It looks like Kane will have to postpone his honeymoon and spend one more day on the job in order to stop Miller and save everyone's lives: his own, his new wife's and the town citizens' whose fear grows by the minute on the ticking clock. And sure enough, everyone deserts the marshal in his hour of need. Now abandoned and going solo, will Kane be able to fulfill his duty and confront Miller and his gang? A great Western classic shot in the midst of the American Golden Age, High Noon stands out on the margins of Western classicism. The movie displays a profound critique of government and society, and thus constitutes as debunking of the mythic West. Featuring main star Gary Cooper, one of the Western conventions' most defining leads, this movie plays with the symbol of the aging star to articulate self-referential and critical elements that will in turn become the "norms" in the Revisionist Western age subgenre, but a decade later. Worthy of note is John Wayne's comment that High Noon was "the most un-American thing he'd ever seen" while coming under fire by Rio Bravo's (1959) director Howard Hawks whose movie is a direct response to Zinnemann's work. Enjoy seeing the grit of genuine film grain on the big screen making this visually iconic opus even more unforgettable. + 1950s trailers, newsreel, cartoon and serial chapter for a vintage night at the movies!

  • L’AVVENTURA (1960) by Michelangelo Antonioni

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place including social distancing and mask-wearing. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-11-22&perfix=3453 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) See the entire series program here: http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/ L’AVVENTURA (1960 Italy, 144 min., 16mm, Eng. subtitles) Michelangelo Antonioni Two well off couples are out for a day of pleasure boating along the coast of Sicily. The restless Anna, played by Lea Massari (MURMUR OF THE HEART by Louis Malle), is not like the others. She unexpectedly jumps into the water while the boat is still cruising, forcing the group of friends to anchor at a nearby deserted island. While swimming, she swears to having seen a shark but no one believes her as she is known to play pranks. The following morning, Anna begins roaming the island and disappears without a trace, taking with her any semblance of a standard narrative structure to the film. In attempts to find Anna, her friends and family wander aimlessly in the landscape, making way for one of the most existentialist experiences ever in a film. Just as elegant as it is brutal L’AVVENTURA de Michelangelo Antonioni (BLOW-UP, RED DESSERT) was a major influence on the new direction the art form was to take in the 1960s. Behind what appears to be a classical aesthetic we find a very unusual drama on the loss of meaning in which characters are confronted at once by nothingness and the absolute. The spectator is bewitched by the sublime and creepy ambiance of the small Italian villages explored by our main characters who continue to search for the missing Anna, all underscored by the ocean waves crashing violently against the rocks. Offering a completely hypnotic experience on the big screen, come see this veritable masterpiece and pillar of auteur cinema outside the confined solitude of home viewing.

  • RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981) by Steven Spielberg (35mm print!)

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place including social distancing and mask-wearing. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-12-06&perfix=3454 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) See the entire series program here: http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/ RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981, USA, 115 min., 35mm) Steven Spielberg Get ready for edge-of-your-seat thrills! Indy (Harrison Ford) and his feisty ex-flame Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen) dodge booby-traps, fight Nazis and stare down snakes in their incredible worldwide quest for the mystical Ark of the Covenant. Experience one exciting cliff-hanger after another when you discover adventure with the one and only Indiana Jones. Archeology has never been so cool. This film revolutionized the action genre by proving that nonstop adventure could indeed thrive around a solid story – aided by superior helpings of smart dialogue, comic relief, a fitting romance, and significant villains. There are even bits of science-fiction and horror thrown into the mix. The James Bond films may have dreamed up the overarching concept first, but many of those episodes tend to dip into the territories of wildly unrealistic and predominantly goofy. Though Indy’s initial outing clearly utilizes a touch of the supernatural, it doesn’t toy with the suspension of disbelief, thanks to a thorough grounding amidst biblical lore. And for all of the project’s perfections, the additional rare feat of indescribably mesmerizing theme music is the icing on the cake. “Raiders of the Lost Ark” was merely meant to be a fun-filled B-movie, but ended up being a classic of striking proportions, receiving substantial critical and commercial success. From the opening scene, in which the courageous Dr. Jones steps out of the shadows to reveal his determined face, his skills with a bullwhip, and his love of hidden treasures, it is evident that this creation is an accomplishment well beyond the ingredients of an average action flick. When Indiana braves deadly booby-traps – including a colossal rolling boulder – some of the most memorable and parodied movie moments are born. Adding to the frequent, breathtaking stunts are the ingenious designs of Indy’s sidekicks, colleagues, damsels in distress, and singular nemeses, who all perfectly complement every smidgen of his daredevilry. Praise must also be given to composer John Williams, who scored most of Steven Spielberg and George Lucas’ prior projects. For “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” he once again creates theme music that simply cannot be forgotten. Williams’ exciting and stirring soundtrack garnishes every sequence, making each one more dramatic, suspenseful, or romantic; such potent use of resonant music in recent filmmaking has, sadly, become far too subtle. What started as Lucas and Spielberg’s historically-set, reality-based version of low-budget ‘30s and ‘40s matinee serials became an unequalled achievement beyond anything they could have imagined, boasting an influence that will likely never fade. Here is your very rare chance to experience the film as did audiences when the film was originally released. A near-pristine 35mm archival print projected on the big screen will dazzle itself into your memory for a very long time.