• NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (1955) by Charles Laughton (Screenings are back!)

    Cinéma du Musée

    CA$13.00

    Good news! We can finally return to our screening events in a real cinéma. With 300 seats, Cinéma duMusée can allow up to 110 people with the prescribed sanitary measures in place. Tickets available on line at https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee?schdate=2020-09-13&perfix=3448 and at the box office (but we recommend buying them in advance) Check out the entire fall series: http://www.cineclubfilmsociety.com/ NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (1955, USA, 93 min., 16mm) Charles Laughton This is the story of a serial killing preacher who terrorizes two young children on the run. Robert Mitchum gives a riveting performance along with Shelley Winters and Lillian Gish. Hailed by modern critics, this visually stunning film is a fine example of the creative use of shadow and light in film. Thematically gritty, it becomes a dark dreamlike expressionistic fable supported by innovative camera work and set design making great use of numerous techniques such as: aerial photography, deep and split focus lenses, silhouettes, forced perspective and haunting underwater shots. Originally shunned by audiences and scorned by most critics, it’s now regarded as a masterpiece of American cinema – which seems all the more remarkable for being the only film Laughton ever directed. It gets re-issued every few years and somehow looks better than ever. It’s an odd postscript to the life of a distinctly odd movie – a slab of Southern Gothic set in the Depression era. Its eccentricities and contradictions make it fascinating; there are so many different aspects of The Night of the Hunter for cinephiles to discuss, it’s hardly surprising it’s become a cult movie hit. We are thrilled to kick off our fall series with such an innovative 'must see' work at the Cinéma du Musée, offering an impressive big screen experience. Tickets for this event are available here (not by cash) https://omniwebticketing3.com/musee/?schdate=2020-09-13&perfix=3448

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  • POSTPONED: FAIL SAFE - (New event will be posted at a later date)

    Cinéma VA-114

    CA$8.00

    EVENT POSTPONED (New event will be posted at a later date) FAIL-SAFE (1964, USA, 112 min, 16mm) Sidney Lumet As in DR.STRANGELOVE released the same year, a squadron of U.S. bombers flies off to drop nuclear bombs on Moscow after a faulty transmission of orders that cannot be reversed. The bombers fly beyond the ‘fail-safe’ point and the president (played by Henry Fonda) is alerted. On the telephone from a subterranean bunker beneath the White House, he must now negotiate with Soviet officials who believe it to be a ploy. In a desperate attempt to prevent a retaliatory attack that would result in a nuclear holocaust, the president must resort to a horrifying compromise. All the edge-of-your-seat suspense lacking in DR. STRANGELOVE is made up for in this deadly serious take on the same story. It was keenly directed by Sidney Lumet, a specialist in tense drama with such films to his credit as 12 ANGRY MEN, SERPICO, NETWORK, DOG DAY AFTERNOON and DEATHTRAP. His talent has earned him dozens of major awards including 5 Oscar nominations. The cast here is nothing less than perfect. Although Fonda was the film’s only big name actor at the time, his talents are matched here by Walter Matthau, Dan O’Herlihy, Fritz Weaver and Larry Hagman (of Dallas fame). Shot mostly in close-ups with occasional arty touches, the style works perfectly to build tension in a film that has the viewer asking themselves throughout what they would do in the same situation. In this 75th anniversary year of the nuclear attack on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, not only is this film essential viewing, its shocker ending will stay with you for decades.

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  • DR.STRANGELOVE -1964- Stanley Kubrick's black comedy

    Cinéma VA-114

    CA$8.00

    DR. STRANGELOVE (1964, USA, 95 min., 16mm) Stanley Kubrick Made during the Cold War in an era when the entire planet lived in constant fear of nuclear devastation, DR. STRANGELOVE treats the subject with the blackest of humour. The fact that it is the only comedic work of his entire career and one of the funniest films ever, is proof of the unequalled talent of Stanley Kubrick. The screenplay offers a story that is as terrifying as it is probable. At the height of the ‘Red scare’, a paranoid American general (Sterling Hayden) is convinced that the Soviet Union is contaminating America’s water system with fluoride in order to adversely affect their vital bodily fluids. Having power over military operations, he decides to launch a pre-emptive nuclear attack on Russia. Its attack protocol makes it impossible to recall the nuclear-armed B-52 bombers. And that’s when the ‘fun’ begins. Next, a British captain (played by Peter Sellers) attempts to reason with the general to abort the attack. The U.S. president (also played by Sellers) quickly holds diplomatic discussions with Russia in an attempt to de-escalate tensions while his military advisor (played by George C. Scott) does his best to spread distrust of communists. The ex-Nazi become political advisor, Dr. Strangelove (yes, Sellers, again), reveals nuclear conflict statistics that hit officials in the War Room like a bomb. Meanwhile, the B-52 bombers fly closer and closer to their Soviet targets. Nominated for four Oscars (the most in the director’s career) and figuring on nearly every list of ‘best films ever’, this striking work is a truly great classic of the cinematic art. Its biting political satire is just as pertinent today as worldwide nuclear capabilities continue to grow and are in the hands of more countries than ever. One way to ease the anxiety is too laugh. And there is no shortage in this film. Note that viewing this film makes our next screening, FAIL SAFE, an absolute must-see. The two are equally brilliant but treat the subject very differently.

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  • BRINGING UP BABY - 1938 - Screwball comedy at its best! 35mm print.

    J.A. de Sève cinema

    CA$8.00

    BRINGING UP BABY (1938, U.S., 102 min., 35mm) Howard Hawks Trust us when we tell you there a few films more hilarious, joyous and brilliantly comedic than the seminal 1938 screwball comedy Bringing Up Baby, teaming up the screen-piercing duo of the glowing Katharine Hepburn (as Susan Vance, a role tailored just for her) and a bespectacled Cary Grant, in the role of the absurd, stumbling paleontologist David “Mr. Bone” Huxley. Shenanigans ensue, as Mr.Bone vies for Susan’s affection, to hilarious results, and Hawks’ film proves timeless, as brilliantly staged as it is raucous and relentless, launching comedic routine after comedic routine at you. Culminating in a stunning how-did-they-do-that slapstick sequence involving the skeleton of a brontosaurus and featuring more than one encounter with the titular feline Baby, it will have you laughing your head off. Catch a restored 35mm print at our screening of what is perhaps one of the greatest comedies of all time, directed by the Hollywood maestro of many genres, Howard Hawks. (Ariel Estaban Cayer)

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  • SONG OF THE EXILE (Ke tu qiu hen) 1991

    Cinéma VA-114

    CA$8.00

    SONG OF THE EXILE (Ke tu qiu hen) (1991, Taiwan/USA, 105 min., 16mm, English subtitles) Anne Hui Sadly unknown in the West, Ann Hui remains one of the most important voices in Asian and female-directed cinema of the last few decades. Having directed at least thirty films in as many years, Hui has received accolades and awards from many top critics and international festivals. In one of her most intimate works, SONG OF THE EXILE, she tells the semi-autobiographical tale of a young woman in the 1970s, Cheung Hueyin (the incomparable Maggie Cheung), studying cinema in London who must return to Hong Kong for her sister’s wedding. Strong family tensions rise to the surface one day revealing a cultural gap between traditional values and the freedom Hueyin tasted during her exile in London. This forces mother and daughter to explore the dynamic of their difficult relationship which takes them both to Japan, a place where Hueyin discovers her mysterious half-Japanese roots. It’s as much a film about intercultural conflict as it is a powerful exploration of the role of women throughout different cultures and periods of history and is the director’s most personal work. It’s hard not to identify with this touching story with its impressive cast, authentic scenery and naturalistic photography. Altogether very captivating. Having had a very limited distribution 30 years ago and never released on DVD, it is a very rare treat to see this in any format. We’ve been able to secure a pristine subtitled 16mm print created for the Taiwanese market. By its very nature, it is a film that truly must be seen in a theatrical setting. Rest assured, you will not regret this night out at the movies. (It’s also a perfect reason to escape the interminably long, over-hyped, boorish event known as The Academy Awards the same night!) Inexpensive coffee, tea and desserts available at intermission. Admission is $8 or $6 for students and seniors. Cash only. After the screening, all are welcome to continue the discussion at Hurley's Irish pub very nearby on Crescent street.

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  • LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN 1948 Max Ophuls

    1400 Boulevard de Maisonneuve O

    CA$8.00

    LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN (1948, USA, 87 min., 35mm) A teen-aged girl secretly falls in love with and meets her older neighbour, a concert pianist. Years later, she again meets her only love but he fails to recall who she is. The story is told in flashback as he reads a letter from her written at the end of her life as she lay dying in a hospital bed and while he prepares for a duel of pistols. Possibly the greatest film of the 1940s, it was directed by European Max Ophuls employing his trademark of stunning fluid camerawork, lush settings and unrushed pacing. Although this was his first American film shot in Hollywood, it retains a continental flavour as it captures the gas-lit atmosphere of early-day Vienna; the opera, the toffee vendors, snow-covered Prater Park complete with wax works and a magical rolling-canvas cyclorama ride. Joan Fontaine has never looked lovelier and gives what is perhaps the finest performance of her career. The dashing and persuasive Louis Jourdan supports her ably along with a fine cast. Watching it is like finding an old photo you thought you had lost, of someone who once broke your heart. Beneath it all is a complex portrait of a deeply passionate woman inhabiting a fantasy of the mind and spirit while the singular object of her affections lives a life of delusion in the hedonistic pursuit of many loves. Projected on screen will be a beautiful restored 35mm print (avec sous-titres français) that allows you to experience it exactly as audiences did back in 1948. Guest speaker: MATHIEU LANGLAIS – A psychologist since 1977 with a private practice in Montreal, he has a degree from Université de Sherbrooke and learned psychotherapy and psychoanalysis at the Montreal General and the Jewish General Hospitals. He studied Jungian psychology at the Jung Institute in Zürich and through the Inter-Regional Association of Jungian Analysts. Other studies include Archetypal psychology (Patricia Berry), Bioenergy (Luc Morissette) and the Feldenkrais Method (Joseph Dellagrote). He teaches in Québec and Switzerland, specifically in Art Therapy in Lausanne. His professional interests lie in working with dreams, images, and films as well as psychosomatic illness. (Presented in collaboration with the CG Jung Society of Montreal) Inexpensive coffee, tea and desserts available at intermission. Admission is 8$ or 6$ for students & seniors. Cash only. All are welcome to continue the discussion after the screening at McKibbin's Irish pub on Bishop, right next to the cinema.

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  • Giveaway - Bad Boys for Life

    Cinéma Banque Scotia Montréal

    **NOTE: The giveaway is now closed. All the winners have been contacted. Thank you all for participating.*** ***************************************************** We have 10 double passes to give away for a special advance screening of the film: Bad Boys for Life! The advance screening will take place on Wednesday January 15th, at 7:00 pm at the Scotia Bank Cinema. Please only participate if you think you will be able to attend. To enter just comment on this post and tells us why you want to see the film or send me a message, and then I will send you a link to redeem your passes. ***************************************************** BAD BOYS FOR LIFE Action/Comedy January 17, 2020 The Bad Boys Mike Lowrey (Will Smith) and Marcus Burnett (Martin Lawrence) are back together for one last ride in the highly anticipated Bad Boys for Life. Directed by: Adil & Bilall Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKIfTx8tzfU

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  • LA BELLE & LA BÊTE (Beauty & The Beast) 1946 Jean Cocteau

    1395 Boulevard René-Lévesque O

    CA$8.00

    BEAUTY & THE BEAST (La Belle et la Bête) (1946, France, 96 min., 16mm, French with English sub-titles) Jean Cocteau Fourty-Five years before the Disney version of this tale by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, Jean Cocteau directed this first-ever film adaptation. Far more than a simple re-telling of the tale, this is actually one of the most ingenious and innovative films ever made. Belle (Josette Day) is a young woman from a family of good fortune who, following tragic events at sea, loses her entire fortune. Her father (Marcel André) is unable to accept her new state of poverty and worries about his ability to continue supporting his twelve children. On one stormy evening while riding the path home on horseback, he gets lost a forest and stumbles upon the castle of the Beast (Jean Marais) Drawn to a beautiful rosebush in the garden he plucks a single rose with the intention of bringing it to his daughter, Belle. That small act infuriates the Beast who then threatens to kill the father but spares his life in exchange for the hand of one of his daughters. Wanting to save her father, Belle flees to the castle of the Beast on an enchanted horse. Upon arriving she is repulsed by the cat-faced creature but ends up spending much time with him. Daily, the Beast asks her hand in marriage and every time, she rejects him. Gradually she begins to know the beautiful delicate inner soul of the Beast and has a growing affection for him. Both an adaptation of European folklore and a metaphor for class struggle as well as a critique of arranged marriage, Cocteau’s film is above all, a technical marvel. Bathed in gothic ambiance filled with sets that are both enchanting and terrifying, its luxurious musical score complements it well. What distinguishes it from other cinematic works of the 1940s are the costumes, special effects and makeup which, unlike the cold modern computer-generated equivalent, makes you truly believe what you are seeing. Admission is $8 or $6 for students & seniors. Cash only. Coffee tea and desserts available at intermission. All are invited to hang out with us at Hurley's Irish pub after the screening to continue the discussion.

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  • LES VISITEURS DU SOIR

    Cinéma VA-114

    LES VISITEURS DU SOIR (1942, France, 120 min., 16mm, French with no subtitles) Marcel Carné This 1940’s feature is one of the shining jewels of the Golden Age of French cinéma in which love proves stronger than all. During the Middle Ages, Satan sends a pair of demons to earth. Unexpectedly, one of them falls in love with the princess whose soul he was sent to possess. It is tempting to imagine that this tale of Good vs. Evil is really an allegory for the torments suffered by the French in WW2 during the Nazi occupation. The clever choice of setting the story in the late Middle Ages permitted director Marcel Carné to fool the watchful German censors. Noteworthy is the beauty of the decor and costumes as well as the sweet splendour that emanates from every scene. We also find the poetic screenwriting of Jacques Prèvert illuminated by the eternal charms of Arletty, the unforgettable Alain Cuny and the irresistible Jules Berry playing the Devil himself. This timeless marvel is superbly acted and directed having input from the great Michelangelo Antonioni as assistant to Carné. Its powerfully uplifting ending is a perfect note on which to end our Fall series as we head into to the feel-good spirit of the Christmas/Holiday season. Offered to the film-hungry projector is a sparkling, physically-restored 16mm archival print that rivals any other format for sharpness and theatrical density on screen. Admission is 8$ or 6$ for students and seniors. Cash only. Box Office opens at 6pm. Intermission features coffee, tea and desserts. We can meet up post-screening at Hurley's Irish Pub on Crescent, just steps away from the venue.

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  • ZIGGY STARDUST & THE SPIDERS FROM MARS

    J.A. de Sève cinema

    ZIGGY STARDUST & THE SPIDERS FROM MARS (1972, United Kingdom, 91 min., 35mm) D.A. Pennebaker The late and legendary director DA Pennebaker left planet earth on August 1st of this year and it is to him and David Bowie that we dedicate this screening. One of the greatest concert films ever made, striking camera work captures those last moments of Ziggy onstage in all their glory. Always hinting at what was to come and yet always innovating, Bowie had commissioned new clothes for the occasion and they still look fresh today. But it’s the way they’re worn, the energy and sensuality with which the performer carries himself that really makes an impact. Backstage footage reveals Bowie’s consciousness of the performance but on stage he’s as absorbed as any actor, becoming Ziggy, a projection of the desires of a hungry audience that we get to see a lot of in this film. As Ziggy, Bowie was perhaps at the height of his powers. His work would grow more sophisticated and there were many fascinating changes to come, but the sheer number of brilliant tunes he put together at this time finds few comparisons in music history. All the audience favourites are here, from his signature tune to Suffragette City, All The Young Dudes, Changes and Space Oddity. They’re delivered with real vigour and are thrilling to watch, holding the viewer all the way to the grand finale. The film has been criticised for the rough quality of some of the footage, but this gives it a vérité quality which distinguishes the real from the legend. It has an immediacy that keeps the film relevant to changing audiences and the grainy visuals help to conjure up the experience of being at a concert in that era, when the air was full of backlit smoke and evaporating sweat drenched in coloured beams of light. Forget Blu Ray, 2K and 4K ‘restorations’. The ultimate way to view this film is on glorious 35mm film! (our print is a beauty) This may not be everybody’s idea of a good time, but rock n’ roll in the raw was never suited to those with delicate sensibilities. For all its mythologizing, ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS tells it the way it was. Here is your chance to be there, now! GUEST SPEAKER: Mathieu Li-Goyette Admission is $8, $6 for seniors and students. Cash only. Coffee, tea and desserts available at intermission. Box office opens at 6pm.

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