• Screening: A Shot in the Dark

    Cinema J.A.de Seve - Concordia U.

    (1964, United Kingdom/USA, 102 min., 35mm) Blake Edwards From its colourfully animated hilarious opening credits by George Dunning of YELLOW SUBMARINE fame, the viewer is drawn into this screwball comedy, arguably the best in the long-running series of films featuring the character of Inspector Clouseau of the French Sûreté. And no one has rendered him better, by far, than Peter Sellers, a master of characterization and comic timing. His interactions with the environment he is in, not to mention his personal relationships, create one of the greatest comic dynamics in history. The film also introduces Herbert Lom as his long-suffering boss, Commissioner Dreyfus, and Burt Kwouk as his stalwart servant Cato, both of whom would become series regulars. Clouseau’s female accomplice throughout the film (Elke Sommer) is not only the sex icon, but is always ominous as to whether she will become something of a Femme Fatale, acting as what could be considered as a catalyst for Sellers’ humour. She also keeps the identity of the murderer ambiguous which leads the audience to actively speculate who it is. Laugh out loud funny, it was directed by comedy wizard Blake Edwards, who co-scripted with William Peter Blatty of EXORCIST fame (?!) Peter Bogdanovich, the filmmaker (LAST PICTURE SHOW), critic and essayist came up with an interesting theory about comic cinema after much research: ‘‘… it takes at least 100 people to get a decent laugh in a movie — smaller audiences are just not given to letting go’’ Why not test that out with us in a real movie theatre with a restored version 35mm print? And just for you, there’s an added treat from our archives; a 35mm print of a Pink Panther cartoon that was screened regularly in the 1970s at a Drive-In just south of the border in upstate New York. Please drop in for a night of fun! Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: Sunrise (with Live Musicians!)

    Westmount Park United Church

    (1927 USA, 94 min., 16mm, English intertitles) F.W. Murnau Winner of the first ever Oscar for Best Picture, Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans remains one of the finest love stories ever told. In both direction and visual effects it brought the art form to a higher level and was made right before The Jazz Singer, the first film that could talk. Over the years, academics and critics have come to realize that Sunrise was just as transformative as The Jazz Singer, pioneering ideas of space, illusion and superimposition that continue to be used today. There will always be viewers who stubbornly say, “That’s a silent movie. I have no desire to watch it.” But they’re missing out. Sunrise is without a doubt one of the finest movie experiences ever. And there’s no better way to view this beautiful masterpiece of the silent era than on the big screen in a stunning old gothic church with live musicians on piano, organ, string and wind instruments. Our previous screenings there have been hugely popular so please arrive early whether you buy your tickets in advance or at the door. (General admission. Doors open at 6:30pm) W.P. United Church, 4695 de Maisonneuve O. (Vendôme metro) $16, $11(students, 65+) at the door (cash only) or on-line: www.lavitrine.com from April 1st. Snacks, popcorn and drinks will be available.

  • Screening: Cat People + The Leopard Man

    Cinema J.A.de Seve - Concordia U.

    CAT PEOPLE (1942, USA, 73 min., 16mm) Jacques Tourneur / Producer: Val Lewton THE LEOPARD MAN (1943, USA, 66 min., 35mm) Jacques Tourneur / Producer: Val Lewton In the 1940s, writer-producer Val Lewton oversaw a series of darkly poetic low-budget horror films at RKO studios that have come to be appreciated for their shadowy aesthetic and psychological themes, rather than the visible monstrosities produced by Universal, such as The Wolf Man (1941). After what is perceived as the classic period of the 1930s, with such film as Frankenstein and Dracula (both from 1931), much of the output of 1940s American horror has been disparaged in scholarship and by critics as degenerating into parodies and multiple-monster films dubbed “monster rallies.” However, the films produced by Lewton, who was called the “man in the shadows,” were given elevated status as “terror” films based on their emphasis on dread and the unseen over the supposedly more upfront and visceral “horror” aesthetic. The Lewton productions have come to be understood as the “sophisticated” side of the 1940s horror. The term Lewtonesque has come to be used to describe the eponymous genre named after his cherished oeuvre. The two films presented, Cat People (1942) and The Leopard Man (1943), both directed by Jacques Tourneur, have often been discussed by critics in terms of their astonishingly beautiful chiaroscuro visuals. However, I will discuss the films’ sound design by the unknown and uncredited James G. Stewart, who came to RKO in the late-1920s and became one of the most important sound innovators in Hollywood, working with Orson Welles on both Citizen Kane (1941) and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). The Lewton/Tourneur/Stewart collaboration can be credited with creating one of the first jump scares in the history of the horror film. And while sound continues to be relegated to a level below visuals in mainstream cinema theory and journalism, any horror fan would agree that sound design is central to the experience of the horror film. Sound design is part of the spectacle of horror, the genre’s attractions, and central to all the films Val Lewton produced in the “snake pit” (the basement) of RKO. The shadowy aesthetic of the Lewtonesque is a feast both visual and aural. Mario DeGiglio-Bellemare Guest speaker : Mario DeGiglio-Bellemare teaches courses in genre cinema, grotesque traditions, cinematic embodiment, and monster ethics in the Humanities department at John Abbott College in Montréal. He has recently published articles on the Grand-Guignol and cinema in the journal Horror Studies (5.1), and in the book, Recovering 1940s Horror Cinema: Traces of a Lost Decade (2015), for which he is a co-editor. He also has an article on Jean Rollin in the book, Global Fear: International Horror Directors (Intellect, 2016), on Joe D’Amato in Intensities, 2017, and on Lucio Fulci in Monstrum (2018). Also, he has a chapter on the episode “The Body” (S5E16) in an anthology entitled Joss Whedon vs. the Horror Tradition: The Production of Genre in Buffy and Beyond (2019). Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

  • Screening: Soldier of Orange (Soldaat van Oranje)

    VA-114 Cinema (Fine Arts (VA) building of Concordia University)

    (1977, Netherlands / Belgium, 155 min., 16mm, English subtitles) Paul Verhoeven It is 1930 in the Netherlands as five young men enjoy a pleasant peaceful life. Having originally met at a fraternal initiation ritual, their solid friendship grows with the years. It is in September of 1939, upon learning that the world is at war that their lives will change forever. When Germany invades their country, the five friends become separated and occupy their own distinct places in society while holding to one common goal: conquer the Nazi invaders by any means necessary! Before his popular and prolific career in Hollywood, Paul Verhoeven (Robocop, Total Recall, Basic Instinct) made several films in his native Holland. SOLDAAT VAN ORANGE tells an epic dramatic tale of intimate friendships and the power of human determination in the face of enormous dark obstacles. In one of the most ambitious films of his career, Verhoeven juggles the complex human, suspense and visceral elements quite skillfully. Featuring some extremely talented actresses and actors, including Rutger Hauer (Blade Runner, The Hitcher) in one of his first leading roles, this film is nearly impossible to see anywhere on a big screen. So what better way than to immerse yourself in an excellent condition uncut archival print! Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: The Quiet Earth

    VA-114 Cinema (Fine Arts (VA) building of Concordia University)

    (1985, New Zealand, 91 min., 35mm) Geoff Murphy Unlike Australia’s loud and violent Mad Max (1979), New Zealand’s The Quiet Earth approaches the end of the world in a very different way. Without biker gangs, zombies, marauders, vigilantes or secret societies of survivors, the silent planet comes to its end with a creepy and terrifying peacefulness. The film takes an engaging and pensive journey through the psychological ramifications of being truly, not metaphorically, alone in this world. In spite of some thrilling moments, this is hardly an action film. Zac Hobson (superbly portrayed by Bruno Lawrence) wakes up late for work because his alarm clock didn’t go off. He calls his office but no one answers, and outside of his window, there’s no traffic whatsoever. Slowly, Zac realizes something is a little bit “off” about this day, something he can’t quite put his finger on. Could it be that every other human being has vanished without a trace leaving him as the last survivor? He finds himself at first desperately trying to find another living human being in an abandoned city-scape. He uses radio announcements and huge signs to let any prospective rescuer know where to find him. But as time goes on, two things become clear to him. 1. He is most likely the last man on Earth and 2. He may well have been part of the cause of this apocalypse. Which brings us to 3. He is quickly going quite insane. What follows is both fascinating and frightening as our only character goes from shock to denial to anger to megalomania to blasphemy to cross-dressing to violence to the edge of suicide to acceptance. But the questions begin to really fly when he discovers bodies out there, some that haven’t been dead for long. Zac spends so much screen time as the only character (which is a testament to the quality of this never-dull film) that the audience is just as shocked as he is when he encounters… No. We won’t reveal what he encounters. You’ll just have to leave the solitary confinement of your couch to join a group of fellow human beings in a movie theatre on a Sunday night in May. The Quiet Earth is a great and unique film, which looks and sounds excellent on 35mm in stereo. However, because the film is so great, it deserves an accompanying short that is an equally unique labour of love that will stay with you for a long time. Witness the FUTUROPOLIS, a space flick from 1984 inspired by Star Wars and Flash Gordon made on a shoestring budget by Phil Trumbo with a small team of dedicated movie geeks putting in lots of meticulous hard work on weekends and spare nights over several years. It incorporates a dizzy variety animated styles, live action effects and quirky ideas for jaw-dropping impact. Like our main feature, there are very few films like it. Being screened for you is one of only two 16mm prints that exist anywhere on earth. Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: The Magic of Méliès

    VA-114 Cinema (Fine Arts (VA) building of Concordia University)

    THE MAGIC OF MÉLIÈS (Docs plus shorts with live piano) (1902 – 1968, France, 120 min, 16mm) In our first-ever collaboration with one of Montreal’s most respected and popular festivals, we serve up a pair of documentaries on one of the most influential filmmakers in the history of the art form; GEORGES MÉLIÈS (1968) by Claude Leroy utilises archival footage and images of artefacts from his earlier period as magician, poster artist and maker of automatons plus LE GRAND MÉLIÈS (1952) by Georges Franju (Eyes Without A Face) rekindled an interest in Méliès in the 1950s with this 31 minute film featuring dramatizations of key moments in his life. These will be followed by a selection of shorts by the great Méliès including the restored hand-coloured version of A TRIP TO THE MOON (1902) all on 16mm and accompanied live on piano. The 37th edition of the International Festival of Films on Art runs from March 19th to the 31st. Tickets available at www.artfifa.com and www.lavitrine.com

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  • Screening: Meet Me in St. Louis

    Cinema J.A.de Seve - Concordia U.

    (1944, USA, 113 min., 35mm) Vincente Minnelli This Valentine to the ‘good old days’ of the 1900’s, and all they stood for, is pure perfection. The iconic Judy Garland shines under the stylish direction of Vincente Minelli in this wonderful Technicolor film that has been hailed as one of the greatest of the Golden Age of musicals, by far. Its story is a portrait of Americana at the turn of the last century and one family’s struggles to deal with progress, symbolised by the 1904 World’s Fair (beautifully recreated for the film) The director proves his eye for detail and captures the era and its values in richly colored gentle images displaying a startling balance of emotions from scene to scene and song to song. A stand out scene that was nearly cut from the film takes place on Halloween night and plays like a horror short unto itself. It must be seen to be believed! Thanks to our generous friends at the Chicago Film Society (that other CFS) we are able to project for you a stunning 35mm print onto the big screen it was intended for. This event is one of the not-to-be-missed screenings of our whole series. Even if you are not a fan of musicals, Judy garland will steal your heart in St. Louis and prove why she is such a Hollywood legend. Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: Penitentiary

    VA-114 Cinema (Fine Arts (VA) building of Concordia University)

    1979, USA, 99 min., 16mm) Jamaa Fanaka Expecting to have fun times with Marie, a young prostitute he meets while hitchhiking, Michael ‘Too Sweet’ Gordone finds himself caught in the middle of a biker gang conflict in a road side diner. While attempting to defend Marie who is threatened by the bikers, he gets knocked unconscious only to wake up in a small county jail cell, falsely accused of murdering one of them. Found guilty by a racially-biased legal process, he gets sent to a state penitentiary populated by an odd assortment of hardened criminals. It’s there that he discovers the cut throat sport of prison boxing. Though trapped behind bars, can ‘Too Sweet’ regain his honour in the ring? Appropriately presented during Black History month, it will be preceded by a truly astounding documentary short. ELECTRIC BOOGIE (1983) by Dutch filmmaker Freke Vujist gives us an amazing window into the cutthroat world of competitive breakdancing by following a band of teen break dancers from the South Bronx who come up with creative ideas and impressive moves based on lived experience. Shot on 16mm using available light, this is an honest portrait of youth surviving their difficult conditions of gang life and poverty through creative expression. With music by such artists as Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, Stacey Latissaw, Arkade Funk and Pieces Of A Dream, this short alone is worth the price of admission. Our very nice 16mm print is of far better quality than the few murky VHS tapes that might still exist after being circulated in educational systems. Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: Alien

    Cinema J.A.de Seve - Concordia U.

    (1979, US/United Kingdom, 116 min., 35mm) Ridley Scott It was 2122, aboard the Nostromo. The opening shot might have reminded you of Star Wars. But this space adventure wasn’t quite in the same vein. Far from the escapism and wonder of George Lucas’ science-fiction blockbuster of two years prior, this industrial refinery was transporting mercenaries, scientists and engineers, who only wanted to get home after their work was done. Released 40 years ago following his Cannes prize-winning début The Duellist, Ridley Scott (Blade Runner, The Hunger, The Martian) abandons all projects for a chance to direct Dan O’Bannon’s (Heavy Metal, Total Recall) tense, claustrophobic script. In essence, the story was simple: after accepting a distress call from the planet LV-426, these seven crew members are lured into bringing an alien component aboard their ship, which becomes, as with so many genre classics, the trap which encloses them with their killer. What differentiates Alien are Scott’s dark direction, Sigourney Weaver’s iconic first lead performance, Jerry Goldsmith’s eerie score, and H.R. Giger’s legendary designs for the never surpassed, slimy, violent, disturbing Xenomorph. “Jaws in space” and “Texas Chainsaw Massacre of science fiction” don’t quite illustrate the deeply terrifying experience of watching the stillness of Alien’s opening shots culminate in its enthralling final scenes… while nothing can equal the authentic experience of rediscovering it as a pristine 35mm ‘director’s cut’ print with Dolby surround sound. Come celebrate the 40th anniversary of this science-fiction horror classic with us, in the deSève Cinema: where everyone can hear you scream! Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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  • Screening: Citizen Kane

    Cinema J.A.de Seve - Concordia U.

    (1941, USA, 105 min., 35mm) Orson Welles Often hailed as ‘the greatest film ever made’, this was a first effort directed by a rebellious 25-year-old genius named Orson Welles. Untainted by the studio system, he threw the rule book out the window then proceeded to build a new window on the world of possibilities for the art form. The use of deep-focus photography and abstracted camera angles, the non-chronological narrative structure and overlapping dialogue, were just some of the myriad formal innovations that Welles brought together for his ground-breaking debut. It is one of the miracles of cinema that in 1941, a first-time director; a cynical, hard-drinking writer (Herman J. Mankiewicz); an innovative cinematographer (Gregg Toland), and a group of New York stage and radio actors (Joseph Cotten, Agnes Moorehead, et al.) were given the keys to a studio and total control, and made a masterpiece. Citizen Kane is more than a great movie; it is a gathering of all the lessons of the emerging era of sound’’- Roger Ebert, late great film critic. Beneath it all is a complex portrait of a man who built an empire rich in materials so that he may fill an inner void. This is a film that is ripe for psychological analysis, which is exactly what we will do thanks to our esteemed guest speaker! Offered is beautiful restored 35mm print which allows you to experience it exactly as audiences did back in 1941. Theatrical screenings of CITIZEN KANE are more than an event. Presented in collaboration with the CG Jung Society of Montreal Guest speaker: Tom Kelly is past-president of the International Association for Analytical Psychology (IAAP). He has been actively engaged in teaching and lecturing in many Developing Groups of the IAAP around the world for many years. He completed his training as a Jungian analyst at the C. G. Jung Institute in Zürich in 1986 and has a private practice in Montreal. Billets / Tickets: 8$, 6$ (Étudiants / Students, 65+), sur place seulement, argent comptant / At the doors, cash only

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