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CLIMATE SCIENCE + ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE = SOLIDARITY/RESILIENT­ COMMUNITIES

We'll be meeting on the second Monday in January because January 2 (the first Monday is our usual meeting day) is a holiday and the building won't be open that day.  

We're excited to have Cecil D. Corbin Mark, Deputy Director of WEACT as our guest.  We will discuss how integrating Environmental Justice with Climate Change Activism will bring more of us closer and make us far more effective and resilient as individuals and in our communities. Standing together against environmental injustice and against destructive plans for our environment makes communities stronger.  


It helps us with room set up to know that you plan to attend, so please RSVP.

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  • Jill M.

    How can we link up efforts on locally-focused issues that are also about about fairness (like sewage plants or garbage transfer stations) with broader environmental concerns so as to affect systemic change? Can we flip from one end of the telescope to the other? How would we structure this idea in terms of shared group actions?

    1 · January 10

    • Ken G.

      Pollution anywhere is pollution everywhere. Air pollution (including radioactive emissions) in a poor neighborhood is still a greenhouse gas for people worldwide. If environmentalists do not fight pollution sources in poor neighborhoods, then instead of eliminating pollution sources, the polluters will move them to poor neighborhoods and claim there are no pollution sources and climate chaos will get worse.

      1 · January 19

  • Jill M.

    Bill - your comprehension is obviously not up to snuff. The speaker was describing how systemic racism works related to the environment, such as where projects get built. and how slow disaster aid is to poor or minority areas.
    You didn't want to hear the message, so you didn't, and instead disparage the messenger in insulting terms.

    January 16

    • Bill

      Jill, do you disagree with me that
      A: He spoke for less than 3 minutes about climate change, and
      B: The topic starts with "Climate Science" but there was absolutely nothing about science in the talk, let alone climate science?

      Furthermore, his contention that blacks in New Orleans were impacted worse by Katrina that whites of equal incomes was EXTREMELY dubious.

      January 16

    • Ken G.

      Bill, you have to cite references to the "dubious" claim so that your words won't be disregarded. From what I've read and been told, race mattered even more than class when it came to what happened before, during and after Katrina. Same with Sandy.

      January 19

  • Bill

    I apologize for calling the speaker a "ninny". That was unnecessary.

    1 · January 16

    • Susan S.

      It was derogatory. And he provided references for those who doubted his claims.

      January 19

  • Jill M.

    I think if you do some reading you'll see that what he said was true about New Orleans and certainly parts of NYC after Sandy. By the way - the title of the talk was Climate Science and Economic Justice. It does often seem that racism is a science of ignorance.

    1 · January 16

    • Sharon

      Referring to the man as a "black ninny" is considered racist. Yes, most definitely.

      January 17

    • Bill

      The fact that he was black was relevant to what he was saying. I already apologized for calling him a "ninny".

      1 · January 18

  • Jeannette

    Very different language was used to describe hurricane victims: black "looters" w shot dead on a bridge or burned in their cars by sheriffs found to have been raiding and pillaging...whites were rescued more readily. Families (blacks) were separated and sent all over the country, or left to drown in their homes. Prisoners were abandoned in jails. Also untrue rumors about dangerous black looters kept many people away.

    1 · January 17

    • Jeannette

      I knew some people whose Katrina experience was very racially skewed: I met some white folks and veterans who went to New Orleans to help, and I spoke to black folks whose families were displaced and relatives died. It's willful ignorance to ignore or "refute" the racial discrepancies that were put forward.

      1 · January 18

  • Jeannette

    WEACT is also having an emergency preparedness meeting tonight at 1845 Amsterdam Ave. It's part of the Northern Manhattan Climate Action Plan. I will probably do the webinar since I have been ill, but I think we (enviros) need to be less separated and fragmented going forward.

    2 · January 9

    • Susan S.

      I agree that we need to be less separated going forward.

      1 · January 16

    • Susan S.

      Jeanette, I don't know if the NY Renews webinar is being broadcasted. I suggest contacting NY Renews directly. I'm glad you're eager to learn more about what they're doing. We're seeing much greater interest in getting involved since Trump was elected. This is GREAT!!

      1 · January 17

  • Susan S.

    Informative, articulate speaker with lots more to tell us about enviro/climate justice and its relationship to race and socioeconomic issues. Helpful to understand some of the factors that keep communities apart. What goes into decisions that put waste treatment plants that pollute the air in one community rather than another? What can be done to make this more just?

    4 · January 16

  • Jeannette

    There was a webinar last week.

    January 16

  • Jeannette

    Is this being broadcast as a webinar as well? I found a 7pm webinar for NY renews when I looked up WEACT.

    January 9

    • Susan S.

      I what being broadcast as a webinar? Are you referring to the event on 1/9 with Cecil of WeAct?

      January 16

    • Jeannette

      It was "How to get involved with NY Renews" also on 1/9

      January 16

  • Jay S.

    Hello everyone,
    I enjoyed the presentation by Cecil and learned a lot in the process.

    Here is more on the Multi-Faith Vigil for the Earth, which I mentioned at the event.

    This peaceful, family-friendly vigil, sponsored by the People's Climate Movement (www.pcmny.org), in collaboration with Greenfaith (www.greenfaith.org), will take place during inauguration weekend. People of all faiths -- clergy and lay people -- will join our spirits and set our intention to work for a clean energy economy that works for ALL people and addresses all forms of inequality and injustice. RSVP here:
    https://actionnetwork.org/events/multi-faith-vigil-for-the-earth-our-common-home

    3 · January 12

  • Ken G.

    Cecil presented a lot of sub-topics excellently. If there had been an hour for q&a, it probably wouldn't have been enough.

    3 · January 10

  • Susan S.

    Please watch this 5 minute video whether you will or won't attend the event on January 9:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xjPODksI08&app=desktop

    1 · December 29

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