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The New York City Rat Meetup Group Message Board › Breeding Question

Breeding Question

A former member
Post #: 2
My female rat is due to give birth. The father is a gentle guy and they enjoy being together. I understand that a female can breed again immediately after birth, so I intent to temporarily separate the them prior to delivery. My question is, can I place the male back in after birth? I read that it is ok, but i also read that it is not suggested. I would prefer an answer from a person that is totally knowledgeable. Thank you. John
Raquel
Raquel2
Group Organizer
New York, NY
Post #: 1,783
Female can become pregnant within 24 hours after giving birth and anytime after that. Male and female rats older than 5 weeks of age may not spend an instant together or running around one another's cages unless you want pregnancies.

"...can I place the male back in after birth?" No. Although I consider myself knowledgeable, I have contacted MAC Rattery (MD) and Ember of Passion Rattery (PA) for input.
A former member
Post #: 3
Thank you Raquel. I appreciate your feedback :)
Raquel
Raquel2
Group Organizer
New York, NY
Post #: 1,784
MAC Rattery replied about my advice to John:
"Sounds great!!!!!!!"

Ember of Passion Rattery replied:
"The male and female are housed together??

"Females go into heat every 4 days. Before these current babies are even weaned she could be having another litter, back to back to back. Males temperment can also seriously change when babies come into the picture. the male SHOULD NOT be in the cage when babies are born or after. Babies can (its not good for them by any means) but can become pregnant as early as 5-6 weeks so males and females should be kept seperate."

Thank you, John, for doing your best to be careful!

Raquel
A former member
Post #: 4
Raquel - Thanks again. Bubba and Goldie have been separated. This was a planned pregnancy. I already have several individuals lined up and ready to adopt. I may keep one or two, but the others will go to good homes. I can't wait to handle and socialize them. What a treat!
Maresa C.
user 9191348
Taneytown, MD
Post #: 8
What was the purpose of the breeding? You are a rattery?
A former member
Post #: 5
What was the purpose of the breeding? You are a rattery?

I am a small rattery in Brooklyn, NY. Have had rats since I was very young. Recently renewed my interest and forging ahead.
My interest was sparked when trying to buy, in NYC, a young, well tempered rat. Found that there is a great lack of resources. Now that I have a litter coming, I am getting lots of requests for socialized weened youngsters. Apparently there is a need for healthy, young socialized rats.
Maresa C.
user 9191348
Taneytown, MD
Post #: 9
As a rat breeder myself, I don't breed for the public. I bred for myself and the improvement of my lines. My rats are first and foremost my family pets. When I breed, I keep back a few pups from each litter, to continue the line and it's improvements. I have a purpose to each planned litter. The rats I do adopt out, only go to homes where my adoption application has been filled out and approved. Then there is an adoption contract to sign too.
When I pair my rats, I pair each litter for a reason. I know each pairing months in advance. My rats aren't bred until they are around 10-12 (some times older, depending on the doe) months old. (the older the better) the reason for this is, so I can keep track of their health and temperament beyond sexual maturity. I don't tolerate aggression at all in my lines.
I know what I'm going to get with each pairing, because I am breeding those parents for a reason. No I can't predict, how many of each sex, or how much of what color. But when I pair, I know what colors to expect, and if I'm breeding for a recessive, I know a rough est of what I'll get. Or if I'm breeding a dominate gene I know I'll get about 50% of that gene in my litter. I plan out my litters before they are bred.
Do you have any kind of breeding program other then just breeding? What happens if that adopter can no longer care for the rat they adopted from you? Are you willing to take back the rat no matter the reason or age and health of the rat? That's what a responsible breeder does. Thankfully I've only had to do that twice and both were because of sever allergic reactions. The adopters were devastated, but reassured when I took them back with no questions asked.
I keep detailed information on each rat that is bred. I have them all in a pedigree soft ware program, where I keep track of all their health and parentage.
Shelters and rescues already hate breeders and think we add to the over population, and that's not the case with a responsible breeder. A breeder that breeds for heath, temperament and longevity. A breeder that wants to learn about genetics and how to bred to get what you want. To breed out major health issues in a line. A breeder that takes back any and all off spring they have produced is a responsible breeder. This breeder will not allow their off spring to enter a rescue or shelter. This may sound harsh, but if an adopter were to break contract with me and give up that rat to a shelter or rescue, I could pursue legal action. I do NOT want my rats in a shelter or rescue. It's my job to keep them out of there if my adopters can no longer care for the rats they've adopted from me. All responsible breeders do this.
If you are truly wanting to breed rats for the improvement of the fancy, please do so responsibly. The breeding of any animal should not be taken lightly. There are several great groups on Facebook about genetics and breeding, that can really help you out if you want to learn, and breed better, happier healthier rats.
One is called Virtual Rat Mentors and Rat Genetic tutorial. There is also Rat Gene Pool too. All of these groups have breeders that know their stuff, and have been breeding for a long time. I can help out with questions you may have too.
I hope I am not coming across as rude, because that's not what I'm trying to do. I am in this for the rats. I want the best for the fancy.
A former member
Post #: 6
Thanks for the information. You are light years ahead of me, but we all have to start somewhere. I have my breeding pair setup and I am taking it slow from there. Thanks to the internet, there is a wealth of knowledge out there. All the best to you.
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