What we're about

Welcome to the Northwest Hikers 55 Plus website.

Our leadership team is made up of volunteers who enjoy experiencing the great scenery the Pacific Northwest region has to offer. We invite like-minded novice or experienced hikers who are ages 55 and up to join us when they can.

To enjoy our surroundings as well as allow for visiting with our fellow hikers, WE SET A SOCIAL PACE.

WHEN REQUESTING MEMBERSHIP: A clear recent picture of yourself must be submitted, so we can recognize you on our hikes; use your real name: first and (optional) last initial.

OFFICIAL MEMBERSHIP: The WAIVER: Consent, Release Agreement, and Authorization form plus $5 fee must be received by the organizer within two weeks after being approved, or you will be removed from our membership.

The SYMBOL @9 by your name confirms that you have submitted the WAIVER and fee, which means you may then RSVP and PARTICIPATE on our hikes or events.

The $5 fee and waiver are collected together every year, the fee covers the $180 Meet up website expenses, equipment, supplies, and donation to WTA.

We appreciate suggestions on hikes you've been on, to revisit them, or new ones you'd like to see.

To learn more about our group, please refer to the Table of Contents by clicking on the MORE tab, then scroll to "Pages" to read the following topics:

- Trail Etiquette

- Rules and Guidelines

- WAIVER: Consent, Release Agreement, Authorization form

- Carpool Guidelines

Upcoming events (5)

GROUP 1 Tonga Ridge, Fisher Lake and Mount Sawyer

Tonga Ridge Trailhead

Come for the bright colors and, maybe, berries. Slowly climb this south-facing trail through second growth timber into open meadows of huckleberries. Views of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness are spectacular. Bring rain gear and wear bright colors. Where there are berries, there are usually bears, and there may be bear hunters, as well. This hike is ~11 miles roundtrip with about 2700' elevation gain (when all the ups & downs are considered). https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/tonga-ridge https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/fisher-lake https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mbs/recarea/?recid=17918 -Meet at 8:45am and be ready to hike by 9:00am -Hike group will be capped at 5 -Trail description says there's a backcountry toilet behind the TH sign on the right -Social pace -Proper social distancing will be practiced on trail at all times. Masks need not be worn while hiking but have something to cover your nose and mouth if we encounter other hikers on a section of the trail where we can't get 6' off to the side. -Note that My 25 lb, 11 yo labradoodle will be with us 🐕 -Let me know if you plan to bring a dog at least couple days in advance so I can let others know. If your dog can't stay with you and on the trail, plan to keep your dog on-leash.

GROUP 2 Tonga Ridge, Fisher Lake and Mount Sawyer

Tonga Ridge Trailhead

Come for the bright colors and, maybe, berries. Slowly climb this south-facing trail through second growth timber into open meadows of huckleberries. Views of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness are spectacular. Bring rain gear and wear bright colors. Where there are berries, there are usually bears, and there may be bear hunters, as well. This hike is ~11 miles roundtrip with about 2700' elevation gain (when all the ups & downs are considered). https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/tonga-ridge https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/fisher-lake https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mbs/recarea/?recid=17918 -Meet at 9:15am and be ready to hike by 9:30am -Hike group will be capped at 5 -Trail description says there's a backcountry toilet behind the TH sign on the right -Social pace -Proper social distancing will be practiced on trail at all times. Masks need not be worn while hiking but have something to cover your nose and mouth if we encounter other hikers on a section of the trail where we can't get 6' off to the side. -Let me know if you plan to bring a dog at least couple days in advance so I can let others know. If your dog can't stay with you and on the trail, plan to keep your dog on-leash.

GROUP 1 Little Giant Pass: the adventure starts with getting your feet wet

Called one of the crown jewels of the Cascades: an idyllic, flat-bottomed valley through which the milky meltwaters of nearby glaciers carve a lazy, winding path beneath larch-dotted ridges and snowy giants. This little slice of heaven is the Napeequa River Valley, and even its most accessible viewpoint – Little Giant Pass – is guarded by a river ford too dangerous to cross for nine months out of every year. (https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/little-giant) At this time, the water is expected to be knee to mid-calf deep. Bring foot wear to use for crossing the river. Trip reports says that these shoes can be left on the opposite bank. This picture shows the river crossing on Oct 6, 2019 (https://tinyurl.com/LittleGiantCrossing). On[masked], I visited the trailhead and took this video of the river crossing: https://youtu.be/kbmeJ25cU20 - The panoramic views of fall colors are the point of this hike. Hence, if the weather forecast indicates rain or poor visibility, this hike will be postponed until Saturday Oct 3 or cancelled. - Washington state Covid-19 guideliness will be followed. - 🐕 Dogs are allowed but must be kept on a leash. Be aware that the river water at the crossing is very cold and that's why I'm not bringing my own dog this time. On Friday night, I'll be camping at a nearby Forest Service campground and you are welcome to join me. If you prefer flush toilets, Lake Wenatchee State Park is not far away. The WDFW pamphlet indicates the date of this hike coincides open season for raffle permits (deer, bear, cougar) and general season for other big games (via archery & muzzle loader). This hike is in game management unit, GMU 245. In case is makes a difference to you, just thought you should know. http://www.eregulations.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/20WAHD-LR4.pdf

GROUP 2 Little Giant Pass: the adventure starts with getting your feet wet

Called one of the crown jewels of the Cascades: an idyllic, flat-bottomed valley through which the milky meltwaters of nearby glaciers carve a lazy, winding path beneath larch-dotted ridges and snowy giants. This little slice of heaven is the Napeequa River Valley, and even its most accessible viewpoint – Little Giant Pass – is guarded by a river ford too dangerous to cross for nine months out of every year. (https://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/little-giant) At this time, the water is expected to be knee to mid-calf deep. Bring foot wear to use for crossing the river. Trip reports says that these shoes can be left on the opposite bank. This picture shows the river crossing on Oct 6, 2019 (https://tinyurl.com/LittleGiantCrossing). On[masked], I visited the trailhead and took this video of the river crossing: https://youtu.be/kbmeJ25cU20 - The panoramic views of fall colors are the point of this hike. Hence, if the weather forecast indicates rain or poor visibility, this hike will be postponed until Saturday Oct 3 or cancelled. - Washington state Covid-19 guideliness will be followed. - 🐕 Dogs are allowed but must be kept on a leash. Be aware that the river water at the crossing is very cold and hunting season is open. The WDFW pamphlet indicates the date of this hike coincides open season for raffle permits (deer, bear, cougar) and general season for other big games (via archery & muzzle loader). This hike is in game management unit, GMU 245. In case is makes a difference to you, just thought you should know. http://www.eregulations.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/20WAHD-LR4.pdf

Past events (354)

Lookout Mountain lookout

Lookout Mountain Trailhead

Photos (14,984)