• The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
    The English Patient was the recently announced winner of the one-time Golden Man Booker Prize celebrating 50 years of the Man Booker. Judges selected one book to represent each decade, then the public voted on the five finalists. From judge Kamila Shamsie: "The English Patient is that rare novel which gets under your skin and insists you return to it time and again, always yielding a new surprise or delight. It moves seamlessly between the epic and the intimate – one moment you’re in looking at the vast sweep of the desert and the next moment watching a nurse place a piece of plum in a patient’s mouth. That movement is mirrored in the way your thoughts, while reading it, move between large themes – war, loyalty, love – to tiny shifts in the relationships between characters. It’s intricately (and rewardingly) structured, beautifully written, with great humanity written into every page. Ondaatje’s imagination acknowledges no borders as it moves between Cairo, Italy, India, England, Canada – and between deserts and villas and bomb craters. And through all this, he makes you fall in love with his characters, live their joys and their sorrows. Few novels really deserve the praise: transformative. This one does." Learn more about the Golden Man Booker here: * https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/books/the-english-patient-golden-man-booker-prize.html * https://themanbookerprize.com/goldenmanbooker/news/english-patient-michael-ondaatje-wins-golden-man-booker-prize

    Ellen's house

    Address will be emailed week of meeting to those who RSVP "yes." · Sebastopol, CA

    7 comments
  • There There by Tommy Orange
    There There by Tommy Orange is about urban Native Americans living in Oakland, CA. Thanks to the compelling characters, provocative theme(s), innovative format (told from the points of view of 12 characters of varying ages) and good writing, this 2018 debut novel is getting rave reviews from critics and readers. "Masterful. White-hot. A devastating debut novel." —Ron Charles, The Washington Post "A gripping deep dive into urban indigenous community in California: an astonishing literary debut!" —Margaret Atwood Reviews: * Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/what-does-it-mean-to-be-native-american-a-new-novel-offers-a-bracing-answer/2018/05/29/a508d0ba-6289-11e8-a768-ed043e33f1dc_story.html?utm_term=.0ef20bf1d5a9 * Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jul/15/there-there-tommy-orange-review * NYT: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/04/books/review-there-there-tommy-orange.html * NYT: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/books/review/tommy-orange-there-there.html Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0525520376/ref=nosim/joanprice-20

    Mac's house

    address will be emailed week of meeting · Santa Rosa, CA

    10 comments
  • Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively
    Claudia is an elderly woman lying in a hospital bed dying. In her lifetime she was accomplished (historian, author), independent, and often short-tempered. Now, grasping for words (ah, "curtain," that's it) in her mind, she envisions writing the history of the world. This book is her history of the world -- Claudia's personal world, plus the pieces of history, art, archaeology, nature, and people significant to her. The structure of the novel is unique -- an incident is narrated from Claudia's point of view, then the same incident is presented from a different character's point of view. The writing is lyrical and profound -- you'll want to slow down and savor the words -- and there's so much to discuss! Although Moon Tiger is an older (1987) book than we usually choose, it's getting new attention because it's been shortlisted for the Golden Man Booker Prize (http://themanbookerprize.com/news/golden-man-booker). This new award celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Man Booker Prize. Judges selected the best winner from each decade. The public voted for the Golden winner, which will be announced July 8. The "Golden Five" shortlist, with the decade each represents: - Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders, 2010s - Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel, "the noughties" - The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje, 1990s - Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively, 1980s - In a Free State by V.S. Naipaul, 1970s Link to Moon Tiger on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0802135331/ref=nosim/joanprice-20. For more about Moon Tiger, read these reviews: * NPR: https://www.npr.org/2011/09/26/140598095/a-lively-independent-heroine-worth-mooning-over * NYT: https://www.nytimes.com/1988/04/17/books/life-moves-too-fast-for-the-picture.html * Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2010/mar/19/booker-club-moon-tiger • What to bring Bring a couple of dollars towards Joan's organizer dues and, if you wish, a snack to share. • Important to know If you RSVP "yes" and later realize that you can't attend, change your RSVP. No no-shows.

    Robin's house

    address will be emailed week of event · Forestville, CA

    13 comments
  • Less by Andrew Sean Greer
    Less by Andrew Sean Greer won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. The committee described it as "a generous book, musical in its prose and expansive in its structure and range, about growing older and the essential nature of love." From the publisher: "A scintillating satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, a bittersweet romance of chances lost, by an author The New York Times has hailed as 'inspired, lyrical,' 'elegiac,' 'ingenious,' as well as 'too sappy by half.'" Arthur Less is about to turn 50, which he sees as the end of life as he knows it. He's a mediocre writer trying to avoid attending his former boyfriend's wedding by accepting invitations to odd international literary events. Nothing is quite what he expected. WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE 2018 A New York Times Notable Book of 2017 A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2017 A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten Book of 2017 Longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence, the Lambda Award and the California Book Award Link to Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/031631613X/ref=nosim/joanprice-20

    Terry's home

    address will be emailed to attendees · Petaluma, CA

    21 comments
  • Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan
    Set at the Brooklyn docks during World War II, Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan is partly historical novel, partly "noir," and partly the story of a woman trying to break through boundaries of gender, class, and family. All the main characters have secrets, which link them in both obvious and surprising ways. Manhattan Beach won the American Library Assn's Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and was listed on many "Best of 2017" lists such as NYT, Booklist, and NPR. Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1476716749/ref=nosim/joanprice-20 • What to bring Bring a couple of dollars towards Joan's organizer dues and, if you wish, a snack to share. • Important to know If you RSVP "yes" and later realize that you can't attend, change your RSVP. No no-shows.

    Padma's house

    address will be emailed week of event · Guerneville, CA

    17 comments
  • EXTRA MEETING: Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover
    Wait -- don't automatically sign up. Read this first: This is not our regular Novel Lovers meeting. This is an extra meeting to discuss Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover. This book has received rave reviews from critics and several of our book club members and is the Book Club Pick for Now Read This, from PBS NewsHour and The New York Times. As a memoir, this book doesn't fit the fiction requirement for our monthly discussions, so I'm scheduling it as an extra meeting. Tara lives grows up in a religious survivalist family. Her father doesn't believe in schools or doctors, so the children don't experience either. The family's idea of home schooling is to send the children out to work in the father's junkyard. Despite the complete lack of education or social skills, Tara ends up going to college. Trigger warning: People get hurt a lot in this book. The children work in a junkyard with their mentally unbalanced father, who doesn't protect them from injuries and often causes them. A violent and sadistic brother causes harm. Yes, it's also inspiring, but be prepared that it's sometimes gruesome and unsettling. Read the Amazon description (https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B072BLVM83/ref=nosim/joanprice-20) before signing up.

    Terry's home

    address will be emailed to attendees · Petaluma, CA

    6 comments
  • Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday
    One of the 15 "remarkable books by women that are shaping the way we read and write fiction in the 21st century." - New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/05/books/vanguard-books-by-women-in-21st-century.html * Winner, Whiting Award for Fiction: "Lisa Halliday’s singular and beautifully-written novel is impossible to put down, and to pin down. It shifts before our eyes from the tale of a literary-world, May-December love affair to the first-person account of an Iraqi-American economist detained at Heathrow Airport. She treats these characters with such integrity and respect they seem corporeal. Nothing, we realize, is as it seems, and it’s deeply affecting to discover not only how Halliday’s narratives resolve but how they connect to one another. She has written a bold, elegant examination of the dynamics of love, power, ambition, and the ways we try to find our place in the world, whether at 25 or 75. Her crisply crafted sentences exude the inviting quiet of an assured artist – all this while posing arresting questions about the very nature of fiction itself. https://www.whiting.org/awards/winners/lisa-halliday#/ "...The first section follows Alice, a 20-something assistant at a publishing house, as she tumbles down a rabbit hole of a relationship with Ezra Blazer, a literary eminence 40 years her senior who bears a terrifically unabashed resemblance to Philip Roth (with whom Halliday had a relationship while in her 20s). For all the obvious imbalances in their relationship, the pair meets at a moment when they’re both stuttering at a precipice. Alice longs to fully enter the world, to write and create; Ezra struggles with leaving it, his body starting to break down. Each becomes the custodian of the other’s dignity ... We’re transported to a holding room in London’s Heathrow Airport, where Amar, an Iraqi-American economist, has been detained on his way to Kurdistan to see his brother. This section is delivered in first person, and by a narrator as different from sweet, somnolent Alice as you can imagine... Asymmetry is not complicated, but it cannot be read complacently. Like it or not, it will make you a better reader, a more active noticer. It hones your senses...." - New York Times, https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/06/books/review-asymmetry-lisa-halliday.html Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/150116676X/ref=nosim/joanprice-20 • What to bring Bring a couple of dollars towards Joan's organizer dues and, if you wish, a snack to share. • Important to know If you RSVP "yes" and later realize that you can't attend, change your RSVP. No no-shows.

    Mac's house

    address will be emailed week of meeting · Santa Rosa, CA

    17 comments
  • The History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund
    The History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund is a 2017 debut novel that is partially a coming of age novel and partially a thriller, but the genre distinctions don't begin to describe why it's stirring the literary award world: Finalist for the Man Booker Award. Finalist for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. * Winner of the GLCA New Writers Award for Fiction. Listed in the New York Times' 100 Notable Books of 2017. One of NPR's Best Books of 2017. An Amazon Best Book of January 2017: "History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund is exactly the kind of book you want to curl up with in the winter. It’s propulsive, vividly written, laced with a razor’s chill and filled with imagery that’s impossible to forget. There is a constant sense of foreboding, of wondering when the truth will crash through the Minnesota ice. Linda is a loner, a teenage girl who walks to school and lives on a failed commune in the woods...Linda begins to spend time with a young boy and his mother who moved into a house across the lake, but their family...are not as they appear. Fridlund masterfully ratchets up the tension, exploding this story of secrets and girlhood with crisp, cutting prose that will leave you shocked and in awe.... --Al Woodworth, The Amazon Book Review Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/080212738X/ref=nosim/joanprice-20 [Trigger warning from Joan: A child dies in this novel. This isn't a spoiler -- it's mentioned early in the book, but we don't know the details until much later.]

    Mac's house

    address will be emailed week of meeting · Santa Rosa, CA

    9 comments
  • The Power by Naomi Alderman
    What would happen if girls suddenly became capable of painful, even lethal physical power? What would change if women could dominate with their newfound power? Would they create a different kind of world -- or not? Join us for a discussion of The Power (https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0316547611/ref=nosim/joanprice-20) by Naomi Alderman. This novel appeared on the "best books of 2017" lists from The New York Times, LA Times, Washington Post, NPR, and others. It won the 2017 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction. "The Power is our era's The Handmaid's Tale." --Ron Charles, Washington Post. In fact, Margaret Atwood was Alderman's mentor. • What to bring Bring a couple of dollars towards Joan's organizer dues and, if you wish, a snack to share. • Important to know If you RSVP "yes" and later realize that you can't attend, change your RSVP. No no-shows.

    Terry's home

    address will be emailed to attendees · Petaluma, CA

    12 comments
  • Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
    • What we'll do Pachinko is a 2017 National Book Award finalist and one of the best 5 novels of 2017 selected by the New York Times. The novel is a family saga, narrating the lives, loves, hardships, traditions, and successes of four generations of a Korean family living (for most of the book) in Japan. The characters and the plot are engaging, and we'll find much to discuss about tradition, prejudice, pride, women's roles, and more. Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1455563927/ref=nosim/joanprice-20. 512 pages, so leave enough time! • What to bring • Important to know

    Diane's home

    Address will be emailed a few days before our meeting · Petaluma, ca

    14 comments