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OC Backpackers Message Board Backpacking Discussions › Backpacks...

Backpacks...

Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 7
Sense, my family and I won’t be doing more than weekend trips for a while, 2-3 nights at the most, what size backpack should we be looking at (in Liters)? I know there is always used gear popping up on Craigslist and eBay, but I’m not sure what we would need. Thanks!

Rodney
Donnie
traildog
Elizabeth City, NC
Post #: 124
Hi Rodney, and welcome to the group. A lot of your questions can be answered at the BP101 you signed up for...but if you just can't wait (I'm the same way) I would encourage you to visit one of the Blue Ridge Mountain Sports stores in the area. The employees are very informative and helpful, and without sales pressure or bias because they don't work on comission. You'll also find many informative links about gear in out discussion pages. Hope this helps.

Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 9
Thanks, Donnie! Yeah, I plan on stopping by there tonight on my way home from work.smile
Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 12
Okay, so went to Blue Ridge Mountain, and they're telling me that for 2-3 night trips, 40-45 Liter packs would be what we need even with winter gear. I'm not buying anything yet, I wanted to get some opinions first. Thanks!
A former member
Post #: 47
By the pack first then buy everything else, your going to waste money on items and then upgrading them later...:)




Okay, so went to Blue Ridge Mountain, and they're telling me that for 2-3 night trips, 40-45 Liter packs would be what we need even with winter gear. I'm not buying anything yet, I wanted to get some opinions first. Thanks!

A former member
Post #: 48
Buy the pack first then buy everything else, your going to waste money on items and then upgrading them later...:)




Okay, so went to Blue Ridge Mountain, and they're telling me that for 2-3 night trips, 40-45 Liter packs would be what we need even with winter gear. I'm not buying anything yet, I wanted to get some opinions first. Thanks!

Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 14
We already have some light weight stuff from kayaking; that I figure will still work. For example: Our ENO hammocks, with rain fly's and bug netting. I'm sure they wouldn't be good for winter, but for spring, summer and fall they would be good. And I’ve been involved with some discussion about wood burning camp stoves and the inability to find dry wood for fuel at times. We’ve never been caught out in the rain while camping, so that’ll be a new experience for us. So I do understand the need for a propane/butane or white gas stove. But I don’t want to buy a pack that’s to small that I can’t get my gear in it…so I’m kind of cautious on the whole pack thing. In a Church, we always say…if you’re going to build a new church building, don’t build it to the size of your current congregation, build it to fit a larger capacity. If you build it to your current congregation size and you grow…you’ll be hosed-up. So, is a 45 Liter pack big enough for a 2-3 night backpacking trip in the winter? Thanks!

Rodney
A former member
Post #: 46
Here is a link to an article from REI that may be helpful.



A lot of it depends on the gear you are going to be carrying. I typically use a 60 liter pack for winter and extended summer trips. I have an Osprey with strait jacket straps which allows me to cinch the pack down when I do not need the extra space. Some of us would argue that if you have the space in your pack you will find something to stick in there, even if you don't need it. I am a big fan of compression sacks for things like my sleeping bag, so that really frees up some room. If you purchase gear that is smaller, you obviously do not need a larger pack. Some of our members take a much more ultralight and minimalist approach to their gear. I am not that member so my take on all of this may be a bit off. Some people have a pack for short summer trips and one for long trips, or winter. We will definitely be covering packs at the 101. So for me 45 liters is kind of small as a winter pack, but there are people in our group that use packs in that range year round. Check out the link and it should give a baseline to get started. Another good resource is backpacker.com and backcountry.com. Backpacker has lots of gear reviews and questions and answers. Backcountry sells gear, but I use them to read other buyer's reviews on a particular piece of gear. Also, I would definitely buy a pack in person, not online. You really need someone who knows what they are doing to make sure you get the right size and they will adjust your pack if you buy from them (Blue Ridge). Anyways, that's my 2 cents. Hope it gets you started.
Phil
Drag-n
Hampton, VA
Post #: 24
2-3 days/nights on a 45L pack? But not in the winter, right? Last trip, my zero bag (compressed), tent (3lbs compressed), ski jacket/heavy sweater (compressed), cook/kitchen bag (jetboil, 2 cannisters) for only 2 br & 1 dinner, BARELY squeezed into my 65L gregory. Had to strap my thermarest on the outside. Honest to god at that time I was wishing I had a larger pack, but new better, because I'd just load it up and carry a heavier weight and then cry and ask Herc to carry stuff. My stuff weighed in at 37lbs with a 1.5l camel bak and 1 l canteen (3.5lbs)

note: NO MORE camel bak in the winter, tube freezes first rendering it worthless.

right now, me, geardog (aka mule) and biscuit have a back up svea (optimus) white gas stove to fall back on when all else leaks, I mean fails.
A former member
Post #: 49
@ Phil, I have to agree with you I am not a big fan of the hydration pack....i went back to old fashion plastic bottles...
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