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OC Backpackers Message Board Backpacking Discussions › Backpacks are on sale and...

Backpacks are on sale and...

Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 21
So, on campsaver.com they have the Osprey Atmos 50 on clearance for $140. I got sized at Blue Ridge Mountain Sports last night and I'm a medium. Now, from all the info that I've been gathering, it sounds like 50 Liters would be enough for spring, summer and fall. Before I commit to the purchase, I guess I'm just looking for some affirmation from y'all. They seem to have plenty in stock, so it's not an emergency. Thanks!

Rodney
A former member
Post #: 8
I for one think at 3000 cubic inches and 3lb weight it is a great choice. I would tell you that it will serve you for all four seasons. Hope to see you on the trails soon.
Phil
Drag-n
Hampton, VA
Post #: 25
closer to 3.5 lbs. IMHO you'll have trouble loading up for even a weekend WINTER hike.
James S.
user 15171391
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 10
Rodney
I strongly disagree with the assessment that a 3000 cubic inch pack is good for all for seasons. I believe you would be better off with at least 4000 to 4500 cubic inch and just learn to discipline yourself not to pack more than you really need to keep the weight at a minimum. Summer is one thing, you can carry very light, compressible sleeping bags, a very light tent composed of mostly netting or a tarp, a canister or alcohol stove and little or no extra clothing. But winter, that can be dangerous. I have been camping in the winter for 45 years and have experienced and seen people get into serious trouble being unprepared for winter conditions. Late fall at high elevations has proven to present dangerous conditions with radical weather swings.
1.Your calorie intake will be radically higher in the winter and your body just needs more food. That’s means extra carry weight and capacity.
2.The last thing you want is to be caught out in the winter and a blizzard rolls in and you are under a tarp or in a flimsy summer tent to save weight and space. Winter storms can and do happen even in Virginia, just ask the rangers over at Mount Rogers Headquarters or ask me. I was caught once in 5 and one half feet of snow overnight on April 5th. Yes I said 5’-6” of snow and I was 5 miles from anything.
3.Canister stoves tend to die when the temperatures fall below 20 Degrees. You will then need to use a liquid fuel based stove. More weight and more bulk.
4.While you are hiking in the winter, even at 15 degree temperatures, the layers of clothing you have on may only be 2 layers and fairly light. However, if you are hiking hard, say continuously up hill, you will sweat and when you stop you will freeze without additional layers or DRY clothing. Again, more capacity needed.
5.When the temperature drops to “ZERO”, do really want that light weight highly compressible 30 degree rated sleeping bag. My guess is NO. A winter bag is not going to fit in a 3000 cubic inch pack along with the other necessities for winter or late fall for that matter.
6.Water must be kept in your pack and insulated or it will freeze. Just ask anyone who was on the last meet-up on Tarjack Ridge.
I said all this so you don’t find out the hard way. Discipline yourself to carry only what is necessary, but get a larger pack or you will be buying a larger one in the near future if you go backpacking at anytime other than summer. But if you have lots of money go ahead and buy the 3000.
Jimmy Ironman (Biscuit)
Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 22
Well, winter backpacking for my wife and I is almost a year away...well, for me. My wife is all about the spring, summer and fall stuff, but winter...she gives me that look. I'm sure you understand what I mean. However, I know me...and I have a bad feeling that if I buy a 65-70 Liter pack, if I have space...I'll use it. I've been looking at the space that all my gear will take up, not including food and clothing, you're right for winter I wouldn't have enough room for clothing and the food that I would need for winter. So, with that given information, to include what you've advised...I'm going to end-up with two packs; a 50 Liter for late spring to early fall and a 70+ Liter for late fall to early spring. By next winter, my dream is to have a Kifaru Sawtooth shelter or a 6 man tipi and one of there medium stoves! But that's a dream. biggrin Thanks for giving me a lot to think about! Y'all Rock!

Rodney

A former member
Post #: 50
I have a 70 Liter and it's okay as long as I'm not doing mega miles....for winter trust me I find things to bring..better off being prepared and okay a little more comforatable :) I think your right about a two pack system.
Mark U! ՟՜ ҉ ☺.
YukYukBahHah
Fairfield, CA
Post #: 126
if you do much backpacking at all this year by next winter you won't be wanting that huge Kifaru anymore, but something that just fits the number of peeps that will be in it.
Phil
Drag-n
Hampton, VA
Post #: 26
Biscuit - Well said!
A former member
Post #: 3
You may want to look at ultralight backpacks from these makers as well. Some are frame less some have aluminum stays and some have ways for you to use your sleep pad as the support, but they all weigh drastically less than most of the major brands.

http://www.sixmoondes...­

http://gossamergear.c...­

http://www.mountainla...­

http://www.ula-equipm...­

I had a gregory 55 which was a really good pack, but kept doing more research and found all these other options and eventually settled on a six moon designs swift and haven't regretted it at all. It dropped about 2lbs that i was carrying all those miles that leaves more room for food and water :).
Rodney
Crockett
Virginia Beach, VA
Post #: 23
Mark, That's part of the reason why I said it was a dream. biggrin I just like the idea of a hot tent. However, the MSR Hubba Hubba that I have weighs 4 lbs +/- a couple ounces. All the weight I'd really be adding is 4 lbs total weight (the stove and stove pipe). If I was sharing the load with my son, would that really be bad? 4 lbs each? one with the stove and one with the shelter? The 6 man tipi, I get...it weighs 6 lbs alone, plus finding a footprint big enough may be a pain. The big thing for me is the cost...they're FREAKING EXPENSIVE! especialy for what you're really getting. I mean let's get real, it's a floorless tarp with a stove jack that you have to seam seal yourself, and they cost $700+. Is it a great idea? heck yeah it is! Am I going to pay $700 and over for one? Not a chance in...well I'm sure you get the point. biggrin
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