• Met Live-Verdi-La Traviata
    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN ITALIAN with English MET TITLES ESTIMATED RUN TIME 3 HRS 7 MINS with 2 intermissions Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Michael Mayer’s richly textured new production, featuring a dazzling 18th-century setting that changes with the seasons. Soprano Diana Damrau plays the tragic heroine, Violetta, and tenor Juan Diego Flórez returns to the Met for the first time in five seasons to sing the role of Alfredo, Violetta’s hapless lover. Baritone Quinn Kelsey is Alfredo’s father, Germont, who destroys their love. Later performances feature Anita Hartig, Stephen Costello, Artur Ruciński, and Plácido Domingo. World premiere: Venice, Teatro la Fenice, 1853. Verdi’s La Traviata survived a notoriously unsuccessful opening night to become one of the best-loved operas in the repertoire. Following the larger-scale dramas of Rigoletto and Il Trovatore, its intimate scope and subject matter inspired the composer to create some of his most profound and heartfelt music. The title role of the “fallen woman” has captured the imaginations of audiences and performers alike with its inexhaustible vocal and dramatic possibilities—and challenges. Violetta is considered a pinnacle of the soprano repertoire. Setting: With La Traviata, Verdi and Piave fashioned an opera from a play set in contemporary times—an exception in the composer’s long career. Dumas’s La Dame aux Camélias was a meditation on the author’s youthful affair with the celebrated prostitute Marie Duplessis, known as a sophisticated and well-read woman whose charms and tact far surpassed her station. The play is still staged today in its original form and exists in several film incarnations, most notably Greta Garbo’s Camille (1936).

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  • Met Live-Adriana Lecouvreur
    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. Soprano Anna Netrebko joins the ranks of Renata Tebaldi, Montserrat Caballé, and Renata Scotto, taking on—for the first time at the Met—the title role of the real-life French actress who dazzled 18th-century audiences with her on-and offstage passion. The soprano is joined by tenor Piotr Beczała as Adriana’s lover, Maurizio. The principal cast also features mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili and baritone Ambrogio Maestri. Gianandrea Noseda conducts. Sir David McVicar’s staging, which sets the action in a working replica of a Baroque theater, premiered at the Royal Opera House in London, where the Guardian praised the “elegant production, sumptuously designed … The spectacle guarantees a good night out.” SUNG IN ITALIAN with MET TITLES IN ENGLISH ESTIMATED RUN TIME: 3 HRS 33 MINS with two intermissions World Premiere: Teatro Lirico, Milan, 1902. Adriana Lecouvreur occupies a unique place in the repertory: largely dismissed by experts from its premiere to the present day yet cherished by its fans for the dramatic possibilities provided by the lead roles. The opera is a deft combination of frank emotionalism and flowing lyricism, with pseudo-historical spectacle. Based on a play by Eugène Scribe, the story was inspired by the real-life intrigues of famed actress Adrienne Lecouvreur and the legendary soldier—and lover—Maurice of Saxony. Cilea’s operatic retelling quickly became a favorite of charismatic soloists. The title character in particular is a quintessential diva role. CREATORS Francesco Cilea (1866–1950) belonged to the generation of Italian composers that produced such greats as Puccini and Mascagni. Adriana Lecouvreur was his only big success with the public, though his opera L’Arlesiana also played for many years and is occasionally revived. Arturo Colautti (1851–1914), who transformed a play by French dramatist Eugène Scribe (1791–1861) into a libretto, was a poet, novelist, and creator of comedies. SETTING Adriana Lecouvreur unfolds in Paris in 1730. The setting reflects a nostalgia for the Rococo era that swept over Europe and the Americas around the turn of the last century when Cilea was composing, evident in other operas (for instance, Puccini’s Manon Lescaut) and in architecture. MUSIC The score of Adriana Lecouvreur relies on elegance and a deft weaving of themes rather than symphonic grandeur. There are nods to a neo-Rococo style, especially in Act III’s dance sequences, but generally the score serves to showcase the singers. Lyricism abounds in the solos, particularly in the tenor’s “La dolcissima effigie” in Act I and Adriana’s Act I aria “Io son l’umile ancella,” whose arching line and theme of the singer as “the humble handmaiden of the creative genius” have made it a soprano anthem of sorts.

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  • Met Live-Bizet-Carmen
    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. Composer: Georges Bizet Sung in French with Met titles In English

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  • Opera SJ-Live-Jake Heggie's Moby-Dick
    Mark your calendar, we have tickets for Series B (first Sunday Matinee) and we will be sitting, Row F, Seats 10 and 12 More details to follow. In the meanwhile, here are a few links for your reading pleasure: https://jakeheggie.com/moby-dick-2010/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moby-Dick_(opera) Tickets available from https://www.operasj.org/tickets/moby-dick

    California Theatre

    345 S 1st St · San Jose, CA

  • Verdi's "I Due Foscari", at West Bay Opera in Palo Alto
    Join us for "I Due Foscari" the 2nd of 3 productions in West Bay Opera's (WBO's) this 63rd season. If you are unable to make this date, other "I Due Foscari" performance dates are: * Sunday February 17, 2019 @ 2pm (talk back following performance) * Saturday February 23, 2019 @ 8pm * Sunday February 24, 2019 @2pm * Preview talk: Thursday February 7, 2019 @8pm Call the box office [masked]) now production season subscription ($129 - $189 for adults) or for single ticket purchases ($65 - $85 for adults). Summary from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_due_Foscari I due Foscari (The Two Foscari) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on a historical play, The Two Foscari by Lord Byron.

    Lucie Stern Theater

    1305 Middlefield Road · Palo Alto, CA

  • Met Live-Donizetti-La Fille du Régiment
    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN FRENCH 2 HRS 35 MINS (1 intermission) World Premiere: Opéra Comique, Paris, 1840. ACT I The Tyrolean mountains. On their way to Austria, the terrified Marquise of Berkenfield and her butler, Hortensius, have paused in their journey because they have found the French army blocking their way. When the marquise hears from the villagers that the French troops have at last retreated, she comments on the crude ways of the French people (“Pour une femme de mon nom”). Hortensius asks Sulpice, sergeant of the 21st regiment, to let the marquise continue on. Sulpice is joined by Marie, the mascot, or “daughter,” of the regiment, which adopted her as an orphaned child. When Sulpice questions her about a young man she has been seen with, she explains that he is a local Tyrolean who—though an enemy—once saved her life. Troops of the 21st arrive with a prisoner: this same Tyrolean, Tonio, who says he has been looking for Marie. She steps in to save him, and while he toasts his new friends, Marie sings the regimental song (“Chacun le sait”). Tonio is ordered to follow the soldiers, but he escapes and returns to declare his love to Marie. Sulpice surprises them, and Marie must admit to Tonio that she can only marry a soldier from the 21st. The Marquise of Berkenfield asks Sulpice for an escort to return her to her castle. When he hears the name Berkenfield, Sulpice remembers a letter he discovered near the young Marie when she was found. The marquise soon admits that she knew the girl’s father and says that Marie is the long-lost daughter of her sister. The child had been left in the care of the marquise, but was lost on a battlefield. Shocked by the girl’s rough manners, the marquise is determined to take her niece to her castle and to give her a proper education. Tonio has enlisted so that he can marry Marie (“Ah, mes amis”), but she has to leave both her regiment and the man she loves (“Il faut partir”). ACT II The marquise has arranged a marriage between Marie and Scipion, nephew of the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Sulpice has joined the marquise at the Berkenfield castle, recovering from an injury and supposed to help her with her plans. The marquise gives Marie a singing lesson, accompanying her at the piano. Encouraged by Sulpice, Marie slips in phrases of the regimental song, and the marquise loses her temper (Trio: “Le jour naissait dans la bocage”). Left alone, Marie thinks about the meaninglessness of money and position (“Par le rang et l’opulence”). She hears soldiers marching in the distance and is delighted when the whole regiment files into the hall. Tonio, Marie, and Sulpice are reunited. Tonio asks for Marie’s hand, declaring that Marie is his whole life (“Pour me rapprocher de Marie”), but the marquise declares her niece engaged to another man and dismisses Tonio. Alone with Sulpice, the marquise confesses the truth: Marie is her own illegitimate daughter whom she abandoned, fearing social disgrace. Hortensius announces the arrival of the wedding party, headed by the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Marie refuses to leave her room, but when Sulpice tells her that the marquise is her mother, the surprised girl declares that she cannot go against her mother’s wishes and agrees to marry a man that she does not love. As she is about to sign the marriage contract, the soldiers of the 21st regiment, led by Tonio, storm in to rescue their “daughter.” The noble guests are horrified to learn that Marie was a canteen girl, but they change their opinion when she describes her upbringing, telling them that she can never repay the debt she owes the soldiers. The marquise is so moved that she gives her daughter permission to marry Tonio. Everyone joins in a final “Salut à la France.”

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  • Met Live-Wagner-Die Walküre
    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN GERMAN 4 HRS 55 MINS (2 intermissions) World Premiere: Court Theater, Munich, 1870. The second opera in Wagner’s monumental Ring cycle, Die Walküre has long stood on its own as an evening of extraordinarily powerful theater. Part of this appeal lies in its focus on some of the Ring’s most interesting characters at decisive moments of their lives: Wotan, the leader of the gods; his wife, Fricka; his twin offspring, Siegmund and Sieglinde; and, above all, Wotan’s warrior daughter Brünnhilde. These characters and others follow their destinies to some of Wagner’s most remarkable music. Setting Die Walküre is set in mythological times, when gods, giants, dwarves, and humans all contended for power. While the first part of the cycle, Das Rheingold, moves between realms above and below the earth, Die Walküre takes place entirely in human territory, as the balance of power in the cosmic struggle tips ever so slowly toward humanity. Music Throughout the Ring cycle, Wagner uses a system of musical themes, or leitmotifs, associated with characters, events, emotions, and things. The entire first act of Die Walküre depicts the experience of falling in love in one great arc, from initial attraction to consummation. It is one of the theater’s most convincing portrayals of the power of love—even if the lovers in question are in fact twin brother and sister. Act III opens with the famous Ride of the Valkyries. In a dramatic masterstroke, Wagner uses the sound of eight powerful female voices, punctuated by shrieking laughter, to depict the terrible thrill of combat. The opera ends with some of the most moving music ever composed, as Wotan intones his farewell to Brünnhilde. Synopsis available on this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/synopsiscast/die-walkure/?performanceNumber=15381

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  • Opera SJ-Live-Puccini's Madama Butterfly
    Mark your calendar, we have tickets for Series B (first Sunday Matinee) and we will be sitting, Row F, Seats 10 and 12 More details to follow. In the meanwhile, here are a few links for your reading pleasure: https://www.operasj.org/tickets/madama-butterfly/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madama_Butterfly Tickets available from: https://www.operasj.org/tickets/madama-butterfly/

    California Theatre

    345 S 1st St · San Jose, CA

  • Verdi's "Falstaff", at West Bay Opera in Palo Alto
    Join us for "Falstaff" the last production in West Bay Opera's (WBO's) this 63rd season. If you are unable to make this date, other "Falstaff" performance dates are: * Sunday May 26, 2019 @ 2pm (talk back following performance) * Saturday June 1, 2019 @ 8pm * Sunday June 2, 2019 @2pm * Preview talk: Thursday May 16, 2019 @8pm Call the box office [masked]) now production season subscription ($129 - $189 for adults) or for single ticket purchases ($65 - $85 for adults). Summary from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falstaff_(opera) Falstaff (Italian pronunciation: [ˈfalstaf]) is a comic opera in three acts by the Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi. The libretto was adapted by Arrigo Boito from Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor and scenes from Henry IV, parts 1 and 2. The work premiered on 9 February 1893 at La Scala, Milan.

    Lucie Stern Theater

    1305 Middlefield Road · Palo Alto, CA