• Met Live-Donizetti-La Fille du Régiment

    Needs a location

    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN FRENCH 2 HRS 35 MINS (1 intermission) World Premiere: Opéra Comique, Paris, 1840. ACT I The Tyrolean mountains. On their way to Austria, the terrified Marquise of Berkenfield and her butler, Hortensius, have paused in their journey because they have found the French army blocking their way. When the marquise hears from the villagers that the French troops have at last retreated, she comments on the crude ways of the French people (“Pour une femme de mon nom”). Hortensius asks Sulpice, sergeant of the 21st regiment, to let the marquise continue on. Sulpice is joined by Marie, the mascot, or “daughter,” of the regiment, which adopted her as an orphaned child. When Sulpice questions her about a young man she has been seen with, she explains that he is a local Tyrolean who—though an enemy—once saved her life. Troops of the 21st arrive with a prisoner: this same Tyrolean, Tonio, who says he has been looking for Marie. She steps in to save him, and while he toasts his new friends, Marie sings the regimental song (“Chacun le sait”). Tonio is ordered to follow the soldiers, but he escapes and returns to declare his love to Marie. Sulpice surprises them, and Marie must admit to Tonio that she can only marry a soldier from the 21st. The Marquise of Berkenfield asks Sulpice for an escort to return her to her castle. When he hears the name Berkenfield, Sulpice remembers a letter he discovered near the young Marie when she was found. The marquise soon admits that she knew the girl’s father and says that Marie is the long-lost daughter of her sister. The child had been left in the care of the marquise, but was lost on a battlefield. Shocked by the girl’s rough manners, the marquise is determined to take her niece to her castle and to give her a proper education. Tonio has enlisted so that he can marry Marie (“Ah, mes amis”), but she has to leave both her regiment and the man she loves (“Il faut partir”). ACT II The marquise has arranged a marriage between Marie and Scipion, nephew of the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Sulpice has joined the marquise at the Berkenfield castle, recovering from an injury and supposed to help her with her plans. The marquise gives Marie a singing lesson, accompanying her at the piano. Encouraged by Sulpice, Marie slips in phrases of the regimental song, and the marquise loses her temper (Trio: “Le jour naissait dans la bocage”). Left alone, Marie thinks about the meaninglessness of money and position (“Par le rang et l’opulence”). She hears soldiers marching in the distance and is delighted when the whole regiment files into the hall. Tonio, Marie, and Sulpice are reunited. Tonio asks for Marie’s hand, declaring that Marie is his whole life (“Pour me rapprocher de Marie”), but the marquise declares her niece engaged to another man and dismisses Tonio. Alone with Sulpice, the marquise confesses the truth: Marie is her own illegitimate daughter whom she abandoned, fearing social disgrace. Hortensius announces the arrival of the wedding party, headed by the Duchess of Krakenthorp. Marie refuses to leave her room, but when Sulpice tells her that the marquise is her mother, the surprised girl declares that she cannot go against her mother’s wishes and agrees to marry a man that she does not love. As she is about to sign the marriage contract, the soldiers of the 21st regiment, led by Tonio, storm in to rescue their “daughter.” The noble guests are horrified to learn that Marie was a canteen girl, but they change their opinion when she describes her upbringing, telling them that she can never repay the debt she owes the soldiers. The marquise is so moved that she gives her daughter permission to marry Tonio. Everyone joins in a final “Salut à la France.”

  • Verdi's "I Due Foscari", at West Bay Opera in Palo Alto

    Lucie Stern Theater

    Join us for "I Due Foscari" the 2nd of 3 productions in West Bay Opera's (WBO's) this 63rd season. If you are unable to make this date, other "I Due Foscari" performance dates are: * Sunday February 17, 2019 @ 2pm (talk back following performance) * Saturday February 23, 2019 @ 8pm * Sunday February 24, 2019 @2pm * Preview talk: Thursday February 7, 2019 @8pm Call the box office [masked]) now production season subscription ($129 - $189 for adults) or for single ticket purchases ($65 - $85 for adults). Summary from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_due_Foscari I due Foscari (The Two Foscari) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on a historical play, The Two Foscari by Lord Byron.

  • Opera SJ-Live-Jake Heggie's Moby-Dick

    California Theatre

    Mark your calendar, we have tickets for Series B (first Sunday Matinee) and we will be sitting, Row F, Seats 10 and 12 More details to follow. In the meanwhile, here are a few links for your reading pleasure: https://jakeheggie.com/moby-dick-2010/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moby-Dick_(opera) Tickets available from https://www.operasj.org/tickets/moby-dick

  • Brad Wade's free Palo Alto opera talk on "Moby-Dick"

    Sheppard Mullin law offices

    Jake Heggie and Gene Sheer's opera "Moby-Dick", based on the classic Melville novel, is coming soon to Opera San José, with performances from February 9th through 24th. You can see a brief description and video excerpts at https://www.operasj.org/tickets/moby-dick/ Before each of OSJ's productions, Brad Wade researches the opera and then gives public lectures on it around the Bay Area. This evening in Palo Alto you can hear about Moby-Dick's composer (Heggie) and its librettist (Sheer) and how they created a riveting opera from such a long and complex book. In addition, Brad will summarize the plot, hand out excerpts from the libretto, and play the corresponding musical passages as you follow along. If you would like to come early for dinner with Brad, POST A COMMENT BELOW to that effect, and you will be included in our 5:30pm reservation for Chinese cuisine at Taste, 423 University Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94301, http://www.tastepaloalto.com/ This is not an O.A. exclusive event. There will also be folks attending who are not in this meetup group. Here is the opera's performance calendar: Saturday, February 9, 8:00 PM Sunday, February 10, 3:00 PM Thursday, February 14, 8:00 PM Sunday, February 17, 3:00 PM Friday, February 22, 8:00 PM Sunday, February 24, 3:00 PM Tickets can be purchase online at https://operasj.secure.force.com/ticket#details_a0Sf[masked]xkQ6EAI or by calling the OSJ ticket office at[masked]

  • Met Live-Bizet-Carmen

    Needs a location

    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. Composer: Georges Bizet Sung in French with Met titles In English

  • Met Live-Adriana Lecouvreur

    Needs a location

    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. Soprano Anna Netrebko joins the ranks of Renata Tebaldi, Montserrat Caballé, and Renata Scotto, taking on—for the first time at the Met—the title role of the real-life French actress who dazzled 18th-century audiences with her on-and offstage passion. The soprano is joined by tenor Piotr Beczała as Adriana’s lover, Maurizio. The principal cast also features mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili and baritone Ambrogio Maestri. Gianandrea Noseda conducts. Sir David McVicar’s staging, which sets the action in a working replica of a Baroque theater, premiered at the Royal Opera House in London, where the Guardian praised the “elegant production, sumptuously designed … The spectacle guarantees a good night out.” SUNG IN ITALIAN with MET TITLES IN ENGLISH ESTIMATED RUN TIME: 3 HRS 33 MINS with two intermissions World Premiere: Teatro Lirico, Milan, 1902. Adriana Lecouvreur occupies a unique place in the repertory: largely dismissed by experts from its premiere to the present day yet cherished by its fans for the dramatic possibilities provided by the lead roles. The opera is a deft combination of frank emotionalism and flowing lyricism, with pseudo-historical spectacle. Based on a play by Eugène Scribe, the story was inspired by the real-life intrigues of famed actress Adrienne Lecouvreur and the legendary soldier—and lover—Maurice of Saxony. Cilea’s operatic retelling quickly became a favorite of charismatic soloists. The title character in particular is a quintessential diva role. CREATORS Francesco Cilea (1866–1950) belonged to the generation of Italian composers that produced such greats as Puccini and Mascagni. Adriana Lecouvreur was his only big success with the public, though his opera L’Arlesiana also played for many years and is occasionally revived. Arturo Colautti (1851–1914), who transformed a play by French dramatist Eugène Scribe (1791–1861) into a libretto, was a poet, novelist, and creator of comedies. SETTING Adriana Lecouvreur unfolds in Paris in 1730. The setting reflects a nostalgia for the Rococo era that swept over Europe and the Americas around the turn of the last century when Cilea was composing, evident in other operas (for instance, Puccini’s Manon Lescaut) and in architecture. MUSIC The score of Adriana Lecouvreur relies on elegance and a deft weaving of themes rather than symphonic grandeur. There are nods to a neo-Rococo style, especially in Act III’s dance sequences, but generally the score serves to showcase the singers. Lyricism abounds in the solos, particularly in the tenor’s “La dolcissima effigie” in Act I and Adriana’s Act I aria “Io son l’umile ancella,” whose arching line and theme of the singer as “the humble handmaiden of the creative genius” have made it a soprano anthem of sorts.

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  • Met Live-Verdi-La Traviata

    Needs a location

    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN ITALIAN with English MET TITLES ESTIMATED RUN TIME 3 HRS 7 MINS with 2 intermissions Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Michael Mayer’s richly textured new production, featuring a dazzling 18th-century setting that changes with the seasons. Soprano Diana Damrau plays the tragic heroine, Violetta, and tenor Juan Diego Flórez returns to the Met for the first time in five seasons to sing the role of Alfredo, Violetta’s hapless lover. Baritone Quinn Kelsey is Alfredo’s father, Germont, who destroys their love. Later performances feature Anita Hartig, Stephen Costello, Artur Ruciński, and Plácido Domingo. World premiere: Venice, Teatro la Fenice, 1853. Verdi’s La Traviata survived a notoriously unsuccessful opening night to become one of the best-loved operas in the repertoire. Following the larger-scale dramas of Rigoletto and Il Trovatore, its intimate scope and subject matter inspired the composer to create some of his most profound and heartfelt music. The title role of the “fallen woman” has captured the imaginations of audiences and performers alike with its inexhaustible vocal and dramatic possibilities—and challenges. Violetta is considered a pinnacle of the soprano repertoire. Setting: With La Traviata, Verdi and Piave fashioned an opera from a play set in contemporary times—an exception in the composer’s long career. Dumas’s La Dame aux Camélias was a meditation on the author’s youthful affair with the celebrated prostitute Marie Duplessis, known as a sophisticated and well-read woman whose charms and tact far surpassed her station. The play is still staged today in its original form and exists in several film incarnations, most notably Greta Garbo’s Camille (1936).

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  • Opera SJ-Live-Leoncavallo's Pagliacci

    California Theatre

    Mark your calendar, we have tickets for Series B (first Sunday Matinee) and we will be sitting, Row F, Seats 10 and 12 More details to follow. In the meanwhile, here are a few links for your reading pleasure: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagliacci https://www.britannica.com/topic/Pagliacci Tickets available from https://www.operasj.org/tickets/Pagliacci

  • Met Live-Muhly-Marnie

    Needs a location

    To find a theater where you can view these extraordinary productions, visit this page: https://www.metopera.org/season/in-cinemas/theater-finder/ Many of the theaters with new lounge chairs require advance purchase of tickets, so make sure you plan ahead. SUNG IN ENGLISH with English MET TITLES ESTIMATED RUN TIME 2 HRS 52 MINS with 1 intermission Composer Nico Muhly (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nico_Muhly) unveils his second new opera for the Met with this gripping reimagining of Winston Graham’s novel, set in the 1950s, about a beautiful, mysterious young woman who assumes multiple identities. Director Michael Mayer and his creative team have devised a fast-moving, cinematic world for this exhilarating story of denial and deceit, which also inspired a film by Alfred Hitchcock. Mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard sings the enigmatic Marnie, and baritone Christopher Maltman is the man who pursues her—with disastrous results. Robert Spano conducts. Music by Nico Muhly, libretto by Nicholas Wright, based on the novel by Winston Graham Commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera A co-production of the Metropolitan Opera and English National Opera