Marching Cubes

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Every 2 months on the 4th Wednesday

Excella Consulting Arlington Tech Exchange ATX

2300 Wilson Blvd · Arlington, VA

How to find us

We'll be on the 6th floor; follow the signs. Check with the front desk for help with the elevator.

Location image of event venue

Details

Welcome to the DC/NoVA Papers We Love meetup!

Papers We Love is an international organization centered around the appreciation of computer science research papers. There's so much we can learn from the landmark research that shaped the field and the current studies that are shaping our future. Our goal is to create a community of tech professionals passionate about learning and sharing knowledge. Come join us!

New to research papers? Watch The Refreshingly Rewarding Realm of Research Papers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eRx5Wo3xYA) by Sean Cribbs.

Ideas and suggestions are welcome–fill our our interest survey here (https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeJwLQhnmzWcuyodPrSmqHgqrvNxRbnNSbiWAuwzHwshhy_Sg/viewform) and let us know what motivates you!

// Tentative Schedule

• 7:00-7:30–Informal paper discussion

• 7:30-7:35–Introduction and announcements

• 7:35-8:40–Papers and Discussion (details forthcoming)

• 8:40-9:00–Informal paper discussion

// Directions

Excella Consulting Arlington Tech Exchange (https://www.excella.com/events/arlington-tech-exchange)
2300 Wilson Blvd
Arlington, VA 22201

This month, Excella Consulting is hosting us at the Arlington Tech Exchange. It's located conveniently off Wilson Blvd in Arlington. There's parking available, and it's just a quick walk from the Courthouse Metro Station. We'll be on the 6th floor; follow the signs.

If you're late, we totally understand–please still come! Just be sure to slip in quietly if a speaker is presenting.

// Papers

Primary paper for discussion (original Marching Cubes paper): http://academy.cba.mit.edu/classes/scanning_printing/MarchingCubes.pdf

An excellent, widely used-and-reused implementation of Marching Cubes, with a mechanical breakdown & tutorial/explanation of how it works: http://paulbourke.net/geometry/polygonise/

In addition to discussing the paper, I also plan to share a personal implementation of the Marching Cubes algorithm, and to use it show some fun interactive examples of creating essentially arbitrary 3D graphical surfaces with Marching Cubes.