• #26 Victor Kofia on Manual for Using Homomorphic Encryption for Bioinformatics
    Victor Kofia will be presenting "Manual for Using Homomorphic Encryption for Bioinformatics" by Nathan Dowlin et al. Homomorphic encryption schemes make it possible to do computations on encrypted data without having to decrypt it first. This paper examines the challenges of using homomorphic encryption schemes on large, highly sensitive biological datasets. It also provides a blueprint on how to get started manipulating biological data with SEAL (Simple Encrypted Arithmetic Library). Paper link: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/ManualHE-3.pdf Victor Kofia is a software developer at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Laboratory. In his free time he likes to contribute to open-source and solve fun programming puzzles. Sadly he can't do either right now because he is nursing an emacs induced repetitive strain injury. To learn more, check him out at https://kofiav.com.

    PagerDuty

    260 Queen St West, 3rd floor · Toronto, ON

    4 comments
  • #25 Diogo Biazus on Out of the Tarpit
    Diogo Biazus will be presenting "Out of the Tarpit" by Ben Mosely and Peter Marks. The paper proposes a framework for software development to tame the huge complexity of modern systems. It analyzes the causes of complexity and proposes an approach based on the Relational Model and Functional Programming to deal with it. This paper has recently inspired an open source relational algebra engine called Project-M36. Paper link: https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love/blob/master/design/out-of-the-tar-pit.pdf Diogo Biazus is a software developer at Nulogy in Toronto. He has founded a couple of companies in Brazil and worked as a database consultant for years before moving to Canada. Now and then enjoys coding in Haskell for fun.

    PagerDuty

    260 Queen St West, 3rd floor · Toronto, ON

    4 comments
  • #24 Leo Zovic on Pursue Robust Indefinite Scalability
    Leo Zovic will be presenting "Pursue Robust Indefinite Scalability", by David H. Ackley and Daniel C. Cannon. The paper presents an architecture for an indefinitely scalable machine, a software development approach for it based on asynchronous cellular automata, as well as some prototype programs and communication strategies. Leo Zovic is a software developer, blogger and programming language nerd. His favorite social networks are GitHub and Stack Overflow, where he occasionally asks pointed questions under the pseudonym inaimathi. He can be found online at http://langnostic.inaimathi.ca/ . Paper link: http://www.cs.unm.edu/~ackley/papers/hotos-11.pdf

    PagerDuty

    260 Queen St West, 3rd floor · Toronto, ON

    5 comments
  • #23 Yawar Amin on Lightweight Static Capabilities
    We're back! Yawar Amin will be talking about 'Lightweight Static Capabilities' by Oleg Kiselyov and Chung-chieh Shan. This paper presents a technique for mixing static and dynamic code verification to achieve safety in practical statically typed languages in use today. The technique works by starting with a 'kernel' of trusted code that the implementer manually verifies, then assigning that code a type to 'certify' that the verification was done. These types then act as the evidence of the verification through the rest of the codebase. Paper link: http://okmij.org/ftp/papers/lightweight-static-capabilities.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by PagerDuty. *** Yawar Amin is a developer with a special interest in statically typed programming languages, and how to use the techniques they enable to make code safer and easier to maintain.

    PagerDuty

    260 Queen St West, 3rd floor · Toronto, ON

    7 comments
  • #22 David Kua on The Weakest Failure Detector for Solving Consensus
    Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** David will be presenting The Weakest Failure Detector for Solving Consensus (http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~lorenzo/corsi/cs380d/papers/weakestfd.pdf) by Tushar Deepak Chandra, Vassos Hadzilacos, and Sam Toueg. This paper presents a model of reaching consensus between faulty processes in an asynchronous system using (unreliable) failure detectors. With the introduction of a framework for thinking about consensus based on failure detection, new avenues for distributed systems research opened up. The effects of this paper can still be felt even now for example the accrual failure detector in the Cassandra database. Paper link: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~lorenzo/corsi/cs380d/papers/weakestfd.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify. *** David Kua was recently an undergraduate student at UofT before he got his degree in computer science. Occasionally he organizes this meetup.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

    2 comments
  • #21 Ding Yuan on The Design and Implementation of a Log-Structured File System
    Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** Ding Yuan will be presenting The Design and Implementation of a Log-Structured File System (http://www.eecg.toronto.edu/~yuan/teaching/gradOS/papers/lfs.pdf) by Mendel Rosenblum and John K. Ousterhout. This paper presents the design of log-structured file system, a novel and unconventional file system design at the time when it was published. NetApp's WAFL file system is later designed as log-structured; but perhaps the paper's biggest impact is in the use of Solid State Drive (SSD): today there is a log-structured file system in every SSD. Paper link: http://www.eecg.toronto.edu/~yuan/teaching/gradOS/papers/lfs.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify. *** Ding Yuan is a computer engineering professor at UofT, where he researches and teaches operating systems and other systems software. Occasionally his research gets discussed by others at Papers We Love, but being a fairly humble guy he only talks about other people's great research.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

    3 comments
  • #20 Duffy O'Craven on The World's Fastest Scrabble Program
    Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** Duffy O'Craven will be presenting The World's Fastest Scrabble Program (https://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/academic/class/15451-s06/www/lectures/scrabble.pdf) by Andrew W. Appel and Guy J. Jacobson. Scrabble originated in 1938, well before the computer era. By the 1980s, Brian Sheppard had created a computer program, Maven, that revolutionized how even expert players played Scrabble. In between, where you find our story, Andrew W. Appel and Guy J. Jacobson published an architectural expose of how they had wrangled the nearly-infinite possibilities of "searching for the best word" into an artificial intelligence. One that could do it in real-time. Computers are now a trillion times larger, and 100,000 times faster than they were then. But it is revealing how mankind first got "intelligence" across the threshold. Paper link: https://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/academic/class/15451-s06/www/lectures/scrabble.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify. *** Duffy O'Craven has been programming professionally since 1980 and during that long career saw things like the invention of C++ and Python. Now international adjudicator for the BACnet network protocol, when time permits he is still hobby programming with an emphasis upon AI in Human-Computer Interfaces. Chatbots, taken up a notch, are the future focus. He would be interested in connecting with anyone who wants to help move that horizon forward.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

  • #19 Suhail Shergill on Semantics of Probabilistic Programs
    Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** Suhail Shergill will be presenting Semantics of Probabilistic Programs (https://www.cs.cornell.edu/~kozen/papers/ProbSem.pdf) by Dexter Kozen. The paper defines semantics for probabilistic programs via two means. One, which is more operational and the other which is closer to the denotational semantics. The paper establishes their equivalence and makes a case that the denotational semantics expresses properties at a more "appropriate level of abstraction. The talk will work to illustrate some of these properties and hopefully make them more understandable. Paper Link: https://www.cs.cornell.edu/~kozen/papers/ProbSem.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify. *** Suhail Shergill is an R&D and innovation lead and active in the meetup and startup community here in Toronto. He organizes the Probabilistic Programming meetup ( http://www.meetup.com/Toronto-Probabilistic-Programming-Meetup/ ) and the Differential Privacy meetup ( http://www.meetup.com/Toronto-Differential-Privacy-Meetup/ ) and is active as a technical adviser.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

    1 comment
  • #18 James MacAulay on Peter Landin's The Mechanical Evaluation of Expressions
    Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** James MacAulay will be presenting The Mechanical Evaluation of Expressions (https://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/user/crary/www/819-f09/Landin64.pdf) by Peter Landin. This paper, published in 1964, was the first to describe an abstract process virtual machine for evaluating lambda calculus expressions – the SECD machine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SECD_machine). In describing the operation of the machine, Landin tackles a range of topics that have remained central to functional programming, such as lists, closures, and recursion. The design of this abstract machine was hugely influential to the history of VM design and programming language implementation as a whole. Meanwhile the expression syntax used in this paper is a close precursor to Landin's ISWIM language that he described two years later in The Next 700 Programming Languages (http://www.inf.ed.ac.uk/teaching/courses/epl/Landin66.pdf) and which heavily influenced later languages such as SASL, Miranda, ML, and Haskell. This talk will dig into how the SECD machine works, and how programming languages can be implemented with it. Paper Link: https://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/user/crary/www/819-f09/Landin64.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

    2 comments
  • #17 Donny Nadolny on Rowhammer.js
    Back on the 4th floor this time! Important: please arrive before 7pm, which is when the front door locks! If you arrive after 7pm, use the keypad beside the outside door and buzz 8882 to be let in. *** Donny will be presenting Rowhammer.js: A Remote Software-Induced Fault Attack in JavaScript (http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.06955.pdf) by Daniel Gruss, Clémentine Maurice, and Stefan Mangard. *** This paper introduces Rowhammer.js, a piece of JavaScript which could be used by an attacker to gain full access to the machine running it. The rowhammer technique can be used to break out of the JVM, the .NET CLR, docker containers - almost any kind of VM you can imagine. We'll discuss what rowhammer is, why it works, and how it can be exploited in various environments. Paper Link: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.06955.pdf Doors open at 6:30 pm, presentation will begin at 7:00 pm. There will be food and refreshments provided by Shopify. *** Donny Nadolny is a Scala developer at PagerDuty, working on continually improving the reliability of their distributed systems.

    Shopify Toronto

    80 Spadina Ave. 4th Floor · Toronto, ON

    2 comments