• Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen (Female Authors Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    Northanger Abbey was the first of Jane Austen's novels to be completed for publication, in 1803. However, it was not published until after her death in 1817, along with another novel of hers, Persuasion. Northanger Abbey is a satire of Gothic novels, which were quite popular at the time, in 1798–99. This coming-of-age story revolves around Catherine Morland, a young and naïve "heroine," who entertains the reader on her journey to a better understanding of the world and those around her. In the course of the novel, she discovers that she differs from those other women who crave wealth or social acceptance, as instead she wishes only to have happiness supported by genuine morality. Austen first titled the novel Susan, when she sold it in 1803 for £10 to a London bookseller, Crosby & Co.. This publisher did not print the work but held on to the manuscript. Austen reportedly threatened to take her work back from them, but Crosby & Co responded that she would face legal consequences for reclaiming her text. In the spring of 1816, the bookseller sold it back to the novelist's brother, Henry Austen, for the same sum as he had paid for it. There is evidence that Austen further revised the novel in[masked] with the intention of having it published. Austen rewrote sections, renaming the main character Catherine and using that as her working title. After her death, Austen's brother Henry gave the novel its final name and arranged for publication of Northanger Abbey in late December 1817 (1818 given on the title page), as the first two volumes of a four-volume set, with a preface for the first time publicly identifying Jane Austen as the author of all her novels. Neither "Northanger Abbey" nor "Persuasion" was published under the working title Jane Austen used. Aside from first being published together, the two novels are not connected; later editions were published separately. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson (The Journey Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of "buccaneers and buried gold". Its influence is enormous on popular perceptions of pirates, including such elements as treasure maps marked with an "X", schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders. Treasure Island was originally considered a coming-of-age story and is noted for its atmosphere, characters, and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatized of all novels. It was originally serialized in the children's magazine Young Folks from 1881 through 1882 under the title Treasure Island, or the mutiny of the Hispaniola, credited to the pseudonym "Captain George North". It was first published as a book on 14 November 1883, by Cassell & Co. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • Death Comes for the Archbishop, by Willa Cather (Female Authors Cycle)

    Death Comes for the Archbishop is a 1927 novel by American author Willa Cather. It concerns the attempts of a Catholic bishop and a priest to establish a diocese in New Mexico Territory. The novel was reprinted in the Modern Library series in 1931. It was included in Life Magazine's list of the 100 outstanding books of[masked]. It was also included on Time's 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005 and Modern Library's list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century and was chosen by the Western Writers of America to be the 7th-best "Western Novel" of the 20th century. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • The Hobbit, by JRR Tolkien (The Journey Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    The Hobbit, or There and Back Again is a children's fantasy novel by English author J. R. R. Tolkien. It was published on 21 September 1937 to wide critical acclaim, being nominated for the Carnegie Medal and awarded a prize from the New York Herald Tribune for best juvenile fiction. The book remains popular and is recognized as a classic in children's literature. The Hobbit is set within Tolkien's fictional universe and follows the quest of home-loving hobbit Bilbo Baggins to win a share of the treasure guarded by Smaug the dragon. Bilbo's journey takes him from light-hearted, rural surroundings into more sinister territory. The story is told in the form of an episodic quest, and most chapters introduce a specific creature or type of creature of Tolkien's geography. Bilbo gains a new level of maturity, competence, and wisdom by accepting the disreputable, romantic, fey, and adventurous sides of his nature and applying his wits and common sense. The story reaches its climax in the Battle of the Five Armies, where many of the characters and creatures from earlier chapters re-emerge to engage in conflict. Personal growth and forms of heroism are central themes of the story, along with motifs of warfare. These themes have led critics to view Tolkien's own experiences during World War I as instrumental in shaping the story. The author's scholarly knowledge of Germanic philology and interest in mythology and fairy tales are often noted as influences. The publisher was encouraged by the book's critical and financial success and, therefore, requested a sequel. As Tolkien's work progressed on the successor The Lord of the Rings, he made retrospective accommodations for it in The Hobbit. These few but significant changes were integrated into the second edition. Further editions followed with minor emendations, including those reflecting Tolkien's changing concept of the world into which Bilbo stumbled. The work has never been out of print. Its ongoing legacy encompasses many adaptations for stage, screen, radio, board games, and video games. Several of these adaptations have received critical recognition on their own merits. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • Wise Blood, by Flannery O'Connor (Female Authors Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    Wise Blood is the first novel by American author Flannery O'Connor, published in 1952. The novel was assembled from disparate stories first published in Mademoiselle, Sewanee Review and Partisan Review. The first chapter is an expanded version of her Master's thesis, "The Train", and other chapters are reworked versions of "The Peeler," "The Heart of the Park" and "Enoch and the Gorilla". The novel concerns a returning World War II veteran who, haunted by a lifelong crisis of faith, resolves to form an anti-religious ministry in an eccentric, fictionalized Southern city after finding his family homestead abandoned without a trace. The novel received little critical attention when it first appeared but has since come to be appreciated as a classic work of "low comedy and high seriousness" with disturbing religious themes. It was placed 62nd in The Guardian's list of 100 greatest novels. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • The Fellowship of the Ring, by JRR Tolkien (The Journey Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. It is followed by The Two Towers and The Return of the King. It takes place in the fictional universe of Middle-earth. It was originally published on 29 July 1954 in the United Kingdom. This is the first of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, but we will only be reading this first volume, for now. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe (Female Authors Cycle)

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Published in 1852, the novel had a profound effect on attitudes toward African Americans and slaveryin the U.S. and is said to have "helped lay the groundwork for the Civil War". Stowe, a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Seminary and an active abolitionist, featured the character of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave around whom the stories of other characters revolve. The sentimental novel depicts the reality of slavery while also asserting that Christian love can overcome something as destructive as enslavement of fellow human beings. Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. It is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. In the first year after it was published, 300,000 copies of the book were sold in the United States; one million copies in Great Britain. In 1855, three years after it was published, it was called "the most popular novel of our day." The impact attributed to the book is great, reinforced by a story that when Abraham Lincoln met Stowe at the start of the Civil War, Lincoln declared, "So this is the little lady who started this great war." The quote is apocryphal; it did not appear in print until 1896, and it has been argued that "The long-term durability of Lincoln's greeting as an anecdote in literary studies and Stowe scholarship can perhaps be explained in part by the desire among many contemporary intellectuals ... to affirm the role of literature as an agent of social change." The book and the plays it inspired helped popularize a number of stereotypes about black people. These include the affectionate, dark-skinned "mammy"; the "pickaninny" stereotype of black children; and the "Uncle Tom", or dutiful, long-suffering servant faithful to his white master or mistress. In recent years, the negative associations with Uncle Tom's Cabin have, to an extent, overshadowed the historical impact of the book as a "vital antislavery tool." As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • How the Other Half Lives, by Jacob Riis

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) is an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. It served as a basis for future "muckraking" journalism by exposing the slums to New York City's upper and middle classes. This work inspired many reforms of working-class housing, both immediately after publication as well as making a lasting impact in today's society. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • Dubliners, by James Joyce

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They center on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination, and the idea of paralysis where Joyce felt Irish nationalism stagnated cultural progression, placing Dublin at the heart of this regressive movement. Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence and maturity. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).

  • The Sorrows of Young Werther, by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    myCowork Montorgueil

    €4.00

    The Sorrows of Young Werther is a loosely autobiographical epistolary novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774. A revised edition followed in 1787. It was one of the most important novels in the Sturm und Drang period in German literature, and influenced the later Romantic movement. Goethe, aged 24 at the time, finished Werther in five-and-a-half weeks of intensive writing in January–March 1774. The book's publication instantly placed the author among the foremost international literary celebrities, and remains the best known of his works. Towards the end of Goethe's life, a personal visit to Weimar became a crucial stage in any young man's Grand Tour of Europe. As with all our meetups, the 6€ charge includes rental of our space (which includes unlimited coffee/tea/hot chocolate) and dues. If you only want water, the cost is 4€. You can also pay with ticket restaurant/cheques vacances but no change will be given. If you have questions about dues, you can read more here (http://parispersonalmeetups.com/dues.html).