Past Meetup

Tonight: another Moon-Meetup - Supermoon at Cinquantenaire

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Short notice, tonight!

We will have another Near Full Moon / Supermoon - lining up the axis Cinquantenaire (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=1040%2C+Brussels%2C+be) - Montgomery at 20:50 at an elevation of 13 degrees.

Bring your camera, the longest zoom you can find and a tripod!

We did it before: http://www.meetup.com/Photoresk/events/200362092/

The view from Cinquantenaire towards Montgomery sounds promising for interesting shots (or the view through the arcs of the monument) .

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Supermoon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon) or a new moon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_moon) with the closest approach the Moon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon) makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth. The technical name is the perigee (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apsis)-syzygy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syzygy_%28astronomy%29) of the Earth-Moon-Sun system. The term "supermoon" is not astronomical (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomy), but originated in modern astrology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrology).[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermoon#cite_note-Discover-1) The association of the Moon with both oceanic and crustal tides has led to claims that the supermoon phenomenon may be associated with increased risk of events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, but the evidence of such a link is widely held to be unconvincing.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermoon#cite_note-2)

The supermoon at 27. September will align with the axis Cinquantenaire - Montgomery at around 20:50 at an elevation of 13,7°
A nice opportunity to picture the full moon which seems to be 13% larger as usual. Bring your tripod or borrow one (use the discussion).

We will have some photographic related discussions and a snack / drink after.

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Here is an internet site which explains nicely some techniques to photograph the moon / super moon.

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-take-photos-of-the-supermoon/

with two remarks: No remote shutter release? use the self-timer of the camera, this helps to avoid shake when pressing the shutter

No tripod? put your camera on something solid. A small sand-bag (freezer bag, loosely filled with rice, sugar or similar) helps to set the cameraBut don't forget: It's about learning from each other - ask and share your knowledge.

Hope the weather is with us ;-)

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