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You are cordially invited to join us in thoughtful discussions on various books and concepts in psychology and related subjects.

Please Join is Online at our 52 Living Ideas Discord Server: https://discord.gg/JjaGPWg

Meetup Schedule: Every Weekday at 9pm ET & on Weekends at 2:30pm ET

Favorite Books Mondays 9pm ET

Jordan Peterson Tuesdays 9pm ET

Life in Coronavirus Age Wednesdays 9pm ET

Psychology & Philosophy Thursdays 9pm ET

Self Improvement Fridays 9pm ET

Stoic Saturdays 2:30pm ET

52 Living Ideas Sundays 2:30pm ET

Bring your curiosity, your love of learning, share what you have learnt and let us build a vibrant intellectual community. Looking forward to your active and ambitious participation. See you soon!

Join us at: https://discord.gg/JjaGPWg

Upcoming events (4+)

Scarcity by Sendhil Mullainathan, Eldar Shafir | Book Club

Needs a location

Full Title: Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much by Sendhil Mullainathan, Eldar Shafir

Pages to read: 234
ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition, and Edition I am using)

While reading the book, consider the below questions:
•What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book?
•What is scarcity?
•How does scarcity change how people think?
•What are the benefits of scarcity?
•What are the costs of scarcity?
•What is the mental bandwidth?
•What happens to errors under scarcity?
•What is slack? How does slack impact decisions?
•What is tunneling?
•Why do people borrow?
•What is the problem with poverty?
•How were the experiments set up?
•What is fault tolerance?
•What expectations of the individual do training programs have?

Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion.

My Review of the Book:
https://www.inquiryreviews.com/2022/02/review-of-scarcity-why-having-too.html

Upcoming event:
https://www.meetup.com/Inquiry-Non-Fiction-Book-Club-for-Inquiring-Minds/events/

Contribute:
The club has costs. If you value out of the event, support the club. Contribute via:

  1. Zelle, PayPal, or Venmo. Contribute to eugenefrominquiry@gmail.com.
  2. GoFundMe: https://gofund.me/adabd41c

Summary from Goodreads:
A surprising and intriguing examination of how scarcity—and our flawed responses to it—shapes our lives, our society, and our culture

Why do successful people get things done at the last minute? Why does poverty persist? Why do organizations get stuck firefighting? Why do the lonely find it hard to make friends? These questions seem unconnected, yet Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir show that they are all are examples of a mind-set produced by scarcity.

Drawing on cutting-edge research from behavioral science and economics, Mullainathan and Shafir show that scarcity creates a similar psychology for everyone struggling to manage with less than they need. Busy people fail to manage their time efficiently for the same reasons the poor and those maxed out on credit cards fail to manage their money. The dynamics of scarcity reveal why dieters find it hard to resist temptation, why students and busy executives mismanage their time, and why sugarcane farmers are smarter after harvest than before. Once we start thinking in terms of scarcity and the strategies it imposes, the problems of modern life come into sharper focus.

Mullainathan and Shafir discuss how scarcity affects our daily lives, recounting anecdotes of their own foibles and making surprising connections that bring this research alive. Their book provides a new way of understanding why the poor stay poor and the busy stay busy, and it reveals not only how scarcity leads us astray but also how individuals and organizations can better manage scarcity for greater satisfaction and success.

Author Appearance: Development and Connection during COVIDby Walther | Book Club

Full Title: Development and Connection in the Time of COVID-19
Author: Cornelia C. Walther

Pages to read: 200
ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition)
ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am Using)

Background info about the book:
https://pozebeingchange.wordpress.com/

This book is part of a series. Other books in the series are:

  • Technology, Social Change and Human Behavior
  • Leadership for Social Change and Development
  • Development, Humanitarian Aid, and Social Welfare
  • Humanitarian Work, Social Change, and Human Behavior

While reading the book, consider the below questions:
•What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book?
•What are some limitations of the book?
•How did the pandemic impact society?
•How did people respond to the pandemic?
•What does isolation do to individuals?
•How is everything interconnected?
•What impact does an individual have?
•What is POZE?
•What is the C-Core?
•How do people change?
•How does nurture work?
•What is COVID-19?
•Who gets sick from COVID-19?
•Why did behaviors need to change due to the pandemic?
•What social aspects did the pandemic make more overt?
•Why is there a need to cooperate rather than compete?
•Why does trust matter? How is trust developed?
•What is the bystander effect and how does it impact connection during the pandemic?

Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion.

My Review of the Book:
https://www.inquiryreviews.com/2022/04/review-of-development-and-connection-in.html

Upcoming event:
https://www.meetup.com/Inquiry-Non-Fiction-Book-Club-for-Inquiring-Minds/events/

Contribute:
The club has costs. If you value out of the event, support the club. Contribute via:

  1. Zelle, PayPal, or Venmo. Contribute to [masked].
  2. GoFundMe: https://gofund.me/adabd41c

Summary from Publisher:

  • Explores policy, connection and complimentarity in the times of the global pandemic caused by COVID-19
  • Combines theory and practice with storytelling and concrete suggestions both for policymakers in charge of designing the collective landscape
  • Looks at the consequences of the prevailing crisis and offers an outlook in two alternative directions

2 books: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (and Sequel) | Fiction Book Club

Author: Roald Dahl

Book was suggested by: Jessica

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Series #1)
Pages to read: 160
ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition)
ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am Using)

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator (Series #2)
Pages to read: 104
ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition)
ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am Using)

While reading the Charlie and the Chocolate Factor, consider the below questions:
•What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book?
•What are some limitations of the book?
•Who is Willy Wonka?
•What happened to Wonka’s chocolate factory?
•What are some stories surrounding Willy Wonka?
•Who are Willy Wonka’s workers?
•How large is Willy Wonk’s chocolate factory?
•Who is Charlie Bucket?
•Who are the children that get a golden ticket? What are their personalities?
•What lessons are learned throughout the book?

While reading the Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, consider the below questions:
•What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book?
•What are some limitations of the book?
•How and why did the group end up in space?
•What was in the space hotel?
•What is Minusland?
•What fantastic inventions of Willy Wonka were revealed in did story?
•How does Wonka handle arguments?
•Is the group going to meet the President of the U.S.A.? What was preventing the visit?
•What does greed lead to?

Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion.

My review of the Charlie and the Chocolate Factor:
https://www.inquiryreviews.com/2022/03/review-of-charlie-and-chocolate-factory.html

My review of Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator:
https://www.inquiryreviews.com/2022/04/review-of-charlie-and-great-glass.html

Upcoming event:
https://www.meetup.com/Inquiry-Non-Fiction-Book-Club-for-Inquiring-Minds/events/

Contribute:
The club has costs. If you get value out of the event, support the club. Contribute via:

  1. Zelle, PayPal, or Venmo. Contribute to [masked].
  2. GoFundMe: https://gofund.me/adabd41c

Summary from Goodreads:

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory:
Charlie Bucket's wonderful adventure begins when he finds one of Mr. Willy Wonka's precious Golden Tickets and wins a whole day inside the mysterious chocolate factory. Little does he know the surprises that are in store for him!

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator:
Last seen flying through the sky in a giant elevator in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie Bucket's back for another adventure. When the giant elevator picks up speed, Charlie, Willy Wonka, and the gang are sent hurtling through space and time. Visiting the world’' first space hotel, battling the dreaded Vermicious Knids, and saving the world are only a few stops along this remarkable, intergalactic joyride.

The Dawn of Everything by David Graeber, David Wengrow | Book Club

Needs a location

Book was suggested by: Victor P.

Pages to read: 534
ISBN:[masked] (Originally listed edition)
ISBN:[masked] (Edition I am Using)

While reading the Charlie and the Chocolate Factor, consider the below questions:
•What is the raison d’etre of the book? For what purpose did the author write the book?
•What are some limitations of the book?
•Does understanding human history matter?
•What are the origins of human social constructs?
•Why did researchers seek origins to human social constructs?
•How do the author approach human history?
•Are hierarchies needed?
•How do people cooperate with each other?
•What is the origin of the state?
•How is power derived?
•What does inequality mean?
•Is there anything fundamental about humans?
•How did the enlightenment thinkers get their ideas?
•How did societies develop agriculture? What are the diverse responses to agriculture?
•Can there be trade without a market economy?
•How can people from different cultures react to people from another culture?
•What is schismogenesis?

Your questions are important and will take priority. If you have questions about the book's content or related ideas, either let me know what your questions are or raise them during the discussion.

My review:
https://www.inquiryreviews.com/2022/05/review-of-dawn-of-everything-new.html

Upcoming event:
https://www.meetup.com/Inquiry-Non-Fiction-Book-Club-for-Inquiring-Minds/events/

Contribute:
The club has costs. If you get value out of the event, support the club. Contribute via:

  1. Zelle, PayPal, or Venmo. Contribute to [masked].
  2. GoFundMe: https://gofund.me/adabd41c

Summary from Goodreads:
A dramatically new understanding of human history, challenging our most fundamental assumptions about social evolution—from the development of agriculture and cities to the origins of the state, democracy, and inequality—and revealing new possibilities for human emancipation.

For generations, our remote ancestors have been cast as primitive and childlike—either free and equal innocents, or thuggish and warlike. Civilization, we are told, could be achieved only by sacrificing those original freedoms or, alternatively, by taming our baser instincts. David Graeber and David Wengrow show how such theories first emerged in the eighteenth century as a conservative reaction to powerful critiques of European society posed by Indigenous observers and intellectuals. Revisiting this encounter has startling implications for how we make sense of human history today, including the origins of farming, property, cities, democracy, slavery, and civilization itself.

Drawing on pathbreaking research in archaeology and anthropology, the authors show how history becomes a far more interesting place once we learn to throw off our conceptual shackles and perceive what's really there. If humans did not spend 95 percent of their evolutionary past in tiny bands of hunter-gatherers, what were they doing all that time? If agriculture, and cities, did not mean a plunge into hierarchy and domination, then what kinds of social and economic organization did they lead to? The answers are often unexpected, and suggest that the course of human history may be less set in stone, and more full of playful, hopeful possibilities, than we tend to assume.

The Dawn of Everything fundamentally transforms our understanding of the human past and offers a path toward imagining new forms of freedom, new ways of organizing society. This is a monumental book of formidable intellectual range, animated by curiosity, moral vision, and a faith in the power of direct action.

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