• Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation

  • Discussion group at Hares and optional lunch afterwards

    This month’s discussion: Topic Title: Gender is Messy, Language is Imperfect Topic Overview: "I've been searching all my life for a rock-bottom definition of woman, an unquestionable sense of what is a man. I've found nothing except the fickle definitions of gender held up by groups and individuals for their own purposes" - Kate Bornstein In modern-day Australia, gender is widely understood as being binary, with the categories of men and women, being solid, stable and fiercely defended. More recently, some people have carved out space for themselves, somewhere in between or outside the binary categories, however, even with these new and emerging categories, there are often similar assumptions that these are solid, stable categories and lateral discrimination and gate-keeping are rife. When we begin to critique the gender categories, we realise that gender is far messier than our gender language suggests. These categories fall apart very quickly and it becomes clear that rather than being objective and stable, all gender categories are not only culturally constructed but also highly subjective. As a group we will critique and discuss different ways to conceptualize gender. What is a man? what is a woman? what is masculine? what is feminine? Can we come up with universal definitions and if not, what does that say about gender? What does that mean for other gendered language - cisgender? transgender? why are gender categories so fiercely defended? is a post-gender society possible? Recommended Readings: Kate Borstein (2016) Gender Outlaws: On men, women and the rest of us. Focus on Chapter 7 "Which Outlaws" - pp 68 - 80 Robyn Dembroff (2018) Why be non-binary? https://aeon.co/essays/nonbinary-identity-is-a-radical-stance-against-gender-segregation