What we're about

Quick, think of your ten favourite authors, in any language (or the first ten you like that come to mind). If you picked at least four women, then congratulations, you are in an impressive minority. If you didn't, then you are perhaps like me and most other people in having had a rather lopsided reading career thus far. Thus far--and no further!

In this group we read and discuss *in English* important (but what is important? That is precisely what we hope to clarify and discover.) fiction as well as non-fiction writing by women, either originally in English or translated into it. The wider the backgrounds of the writers under consideration--in terms of culture, language, sexuality, economic status, period of history, region of world, political power, age, ethnicity, etc.--the better.

That is the only requirement for joining the group--reading, and being willing to express (in English) opinion on, books written by women. One *does not* have to be female to join the group.

We hope to see you soon at the Ramat Gan (and Tel Aviv) F*A*B Club!

Upcoming events (2)

"Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line", by Deepa Anappara

Online event

UPDATE: This will be an online discussion. The link will be put up a couple of days before the meeting. ------ UPDATE: The winner of the poll is "Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line" by Deepa Anappara, so it is the book we will discuss in our second meeting in October. It is not stocked by the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public libraries, but Steimatzky currently lists it in stock, and of course an ebook copy can be bought conveniently online. This recent debut novel, deeply influenced, I believe, by the author's journalistic work, has widely garnered a lot of praise. I look forward greatly to the discussion, and hope that you will join us! ------ Here is a poll to pick the book for our second discussion in October, for which the theme is South Asian authors. Please rank, as usual, up to three of these in the comments below this page, by *Tuesday night (September 29th)*. That night I will tally up the votes and update this notice with the name of the winner. Do please remember to keep the books' availability to you in mind while voting. 1. "The Inheritance of Loss", by Kiran Desai (2006), India. Novel, 357 pages. Winner of the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2006. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/95186.The_Inheritance_of_Loss Available in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public library systems. 2. "Home Fire", by Kamila Shamsie (2017), Pakistan. Novel, 277 pages. Winner of the Women's Prize for Fiction in 2018 and longlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2017. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/33621427-home-fire Available in the Tel Aviv public library. 3. "Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line", by Deepa Anappara (2020), India. Novel, 368 pages. Longlisted for the Women's Prize for Fiction and shortlisted for the JCB Prize for Literature in 2020 (the latter announcement made yesterday). https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/45755173-djinn-patrol-on-the-purple-line Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems. 4. "Lajja: Shame", by Taslima Nasreen (translated from the Bengali into English by Tutul Gupta, 1993), Bangladesh. Novel, 302 pages. No shortlists that I am aware of but this was an explosive book in Bangladesh at the time, the uproar it caused ultimately forcing the author to flee for her life. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/201866.Lajja Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems (though possibly it is, in the Tel Aviv public library, in French). 5. "The Ministry of Utmost Happiness", by Arundhati Roy (2017), India. 449 pages. Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2017 and the Women's Prize for Fiction in 2018, and shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2017. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32388712-the-ministry-of-utmost-happiness Available in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public library systems. 6. "Island of a Thousand Mirrors", by Nayomi Munaweera (2012), Sri Lanka. Novel, 242 pages. Shortlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize in 2012 and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Asia in 2013. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19286587-island-of-a-thousand-mirrors Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems. 7. "All the Lives We Never Lived", by Anuradha Roy (2018), India. Novel, 320 pages. Shortlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award in 2020, and longlisted for the Walter Scott Prize in 2019. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36391803-all-the-lives-we-never-lived Available in the Tel Aviv public library system.

Choose the book for November!

Online event

It is now time to choose the November book. In the last meeting there was the great idea to have a poll on books by authors who are popular and successful but not taken seriously enough by the literary establishment (not high-brow "Literary", so to speak). So here are the titles suggested by group members. These are, for the most part, of greater length than our usual picks, but hopefully these books' popularity is predicated upon their being quick reads nonetheless. Please rank up to three of these in the comments below this page. On the night of *Wednesday (October 21st)*, I plan to count the votes and declare the winner. Please remember to keep the books' availability to you in mind while voting (though, just this once, this isn't that big a concern since there is an abundance of copies of several of them in local libraries, reflecting their popularity; this is assuming that the libraries are open, of course). Note that this will likely be an online event, though if the lockdown restrictions relax then we might hold this as a physical meetup. 1. "The Cuckoo's Calling", by Robert Galbraith (2013). Novel, 456 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16160797-the-cuckoo-s-calling Available in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public libraries. (NOTE: _DO_ check out the author's identity if you don't know who it is.) 2. "Long Bright River", by Liz Moore (2020). Novel, 482 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43834909-long-bright-river Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems. 3. "The Lost Man", by Jane Harper (2019). Novel, 340 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863488-the-lost-man Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems. 4. "Hollywood Wives", by Jackie Collins (1983). Novel, 490 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/112725.Hollywood_Wives Available (in _plenty_ of copies) in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public libraries. 5. "Valley of the Dolls", by Jacqueline Susann (1966). 442 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/581811.Valley_of_the_Dolls Available (in even more copies) in the Tel Aviv public library system. 6. "The Gift", by Danielle Steel (1986). Novel, 216 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/59836.The_Gift Available (also in enough copies) in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public libraries. 7. "Me Before You", by Jojo Moyes (2012). Novel, 369 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17347634-me-before-you Available (in really _lots_ of copies) in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public libraries. 8. "My Sister's Keeper", by Jodi Picoult (2004). Novel, 423 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10917.My_Sister_s_Keeper Available (also in many copies) in both the Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan public libraries. 9. "Who Moved My Blackberry?", by Lucy Kellaway (2005). Novel, 368 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/954312.Who_Moved_My_Blackberry_ Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems. 10. "Get Your Tongue Out of My Mouth, I'm Kissing You Goodbye!", by Cynthia Heimel (1994). Short stories, 192 pages. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/348775.Get_Your_Tongue_Out_of_My_Mouth_I_m_Kissing_You_Goodbye_ Not available in the Tel Aviv or Ramat Gan public library systems.

Past events (20)

"Stay With Me", by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀

Online event

Photos (1)