• April: Advanced Fiddler Techniques

    Online event

    Fiddler is a great free web diagnostic tool that nearly everyone uses, but typically only for very basic things. If all you need is to see the requests made between the browser and web server, the browser devtools can do that. Fiddler has many more advanced features that most developers are unaware of. It can be used to capture traffic from smartphones, tablets, and non-Windows platforms! Discover the power of manipulating requests and responses with breakpoints, the auto responder, and a visual composer. Review popular extensions for formatting JavaScript, syntax highlighting, and detecting image bloat. Go beyond the basics and learn the full capabilities of the tool and how it can improve your web development and debugging techniques today!

    Robert Boedigheimer works for Schwan's Home Delivery providing business solutions with web technologies. He is a Microsoft MVP, a Progress Developer Expert (Fiddler), an ASPInsider, a Pluralsight author, and a 3rd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do. Robert regularly speaks at national and international events.

  • March: All Things Compose

    Online event

    Docker Compose is a tool that's been designed to make it easier to spin up multi-container applications. But, since the formation of the open Compose Spec (compose-spec.io), many other industry partners are pushing it into other areas, including AWS ECS, Azure ACI, and even Kubernetes!

    In this talk, we're going to start with a discussion on what Compose is, how to use it in development, and then go over sample deployments of using it in a cloud environment. A familiarity with containers would help, but is not required.

    Michael Irwin is an Application Architect at Virginia Tech who is striving to modernize how software is developed and run on campus by driving the adoption of Docker-based workloads, CI/CD pipelines, the public cloud, single-page applications, and more. As a Docker Captain and Community Leader (meetup organizer), he has the opportunity to share his expertise and experiences with others, but also learn how others are using the latest technologies. When developing, he writes code in Node, Java (Java EE mostly), and JavaScript, but actively contributes to projects written in other languages and frameworks. He's blessed to have a beautiful wife and four fantastic daughters and one son!

  • February: Get Git 90 Minutes

    Online event

    Git is the most popular version control framework in the world. This presentation will explain what a version control framework is, and then go on to demonstrate creating a repository, creating branches, merging, interactive rebasing, rebasing, and more. Most of the demos will be on the command line, but I'll also show some in GUIs (Git Desktop and Visual Studio 2019) to see how they can save you effort.

    Jesse Liberty is a programmer specializing in Xamarin.Forms, C# and their related tools (especially Git). He is the author of two dozen programming books, a dozen Pluralsight courses as well as courses for Pakt and Udemy and he is the author of a not-yet-published novel. For more, see jesseliberty.com and jesselibertywriter.com, and listen to his podcast: Yet Another Podcast, available in all the usual places.

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  • January: Be a Superhero on Day 1 with ABP.IO

    Online event

    Start your next ASP.Net project with a fully functional, attractive site with scores of best practices implemented, whether you choose MVC, Angular or Blazor as your front-end. In this session you'll learn everything you get out of the box with the successor ASP.Net Boilerplate, a wildly popular free and open source web application framework. Don't miss this opportunity to be a superhero on day 1 of your next web project.

    Lee is a prolific writer, speaker, and video producer on .Net and open source topics. He has published over 100 posts to his personal blog (https://www.leerichardson.com) that have received more than half a million views since 2007. His "Code Hour" YouTube channel (https://youtube.com/leerichardson200) has attracted over 1,000 subscribers who have collectively consumed over 7 thousand hours of his content. StackOverflow ranks him as a top 2% contributor. He has published 25 articles to CodeProject with an average article rating of 4.96/5. Throughout his 20 year software development consulting career in the DC area he has spoken scores of times at code camps, conferences, and user groups. He created the Siren of Shame (https://sirenofshame.com), and is a Solution Samurai at InfernoRed (http://infernoredtech.com). When not coding he enjoys running, mountain biking, smoking brisket, electronics, 3D printing, and woodworking. He is active on twitter where you can reach him @lprichar (https://twitter.com/lprichar).

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  • December: Dungeons, Dragons, and Graph Databases

    Online event

    Are you an adventurer? Do you want gold? Experience? Levels? Of course you do! And where do you get these things? The dungeon, where else? That wonderful container of all things adventurous! But, unfortunately, dungeons aren't setup for the convenience of adventurers who wish to extract these fine things. It’s almost as if the dungeon master just made the dungeon up at random. And so you wander about and you get what you get.

    But you’re also a developer. You could build a database of all the rooms with their shiny and monstrous content. Then you could query it and find the optimal route to get the gold and the experience and the levels. But how would you model this data and write these queries? The rooms. The corridors. The monsters. The sparkling hoozits. That’s a lot of entities to relate to each other. And that’s gonna be a monster of a SQL query. Whoa–look at that JOIN! Better get my text editor ready.

    Or, you could use a graph database. A graph database allows you to model these relationships simply and intuitively with nodes and edges. Being schema-free, you can evolve your graph as you encounter new things such as traps or secret doors. And, using the Cypher query language, you can write elegant and easy to understand queries that find the best routes to get the stuff adventures desire most.

    In this talk, I’ll use the aforementioned example to introduce you to the concepts of graph databases. I’ll compare how to solve this problem with a relational database and how a graph database makes it easier. I’ll show you how to query and modify your graph. And, as no talk would be complete without a live demo, I’ll do it all using a real-time procedurally generated random dungeon (I am a dungeon master after all).

    So come, have a flagon of mead as you learn about graph databases, optimize your dungeon crawl, and equip another weapon in your quest for better software!

    Guy works for Redis Labs as a Developer Advocate. Combining his decades of experience in writing software with a passion for sharing what he has learned, Guy goes out into developer communities and helps others build great software.

    Teaching and community have long been a focus for Guy. He is President of the Columbus JavaScript Users Group, an organizer for the Columbus Functional Programmers, and has even helped teach programming at a prison in central Ohio.

    In his personal life, Guy is a hard-boiled geek interested in role-playing games, science fiction, and technology. He also has a slightly less geeky interest in history and linguistics. In his spare time, he volunteers for his local Cub Scout Pack, goes camping, and studies history and linguistics.

    Guy lives in Ohio with his wife, his three teenage sons, and an entire wall of games.

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  • November: JavaScript Worker Procs, Communication, and Storage Features

    JavaScript has become one of the dominant languages on the web. To enable a richer client experience, JavaScript utilizes worker processes that expedite AJAX calls with little complexity, and web sockets for bi-directional communication. In addition, JavaScript APIs are now available to facilitate user’s geographical location access. In this session, we’ll review these features and discuss how they can be applied to any modern web site.

    Some of the topics covered in this talk:
    -Web Workers
    -Web Sockets
    -GeoLocation
    -Web Storage
    -Modernizr

    Sam Nasr has been a software developer since 1995, focusing mostly on Microsoft technologies. He’s a Sr. Software Engineer with NIS Technologies where he consults and teaches clients about the latest .Net technologies. Sam has achieved multiple certifications from Microsoft (MCSA, MCAD, MCTS, MCT), and is the leader of the Cleveland C#/VB.Net User Group since 2003. In addition, he’s the leader of the .Net Study Group, an author for Visual Studio Magazine, and a 5x Microsoft MVP. When not coding, Sam loves spending time with his family and friends or volunteering at his local church.

  • RVNUG Monthly Meeting

    Ge Digital

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  • RVNUG Monthly Meeting

    Ge Digital

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  • RVNUG Monthly Meeting

    Ge Digital

  • RVNUG Monthly Meeting

    Ge Digital

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