• 2 Talks: Scala 3, what does it means for me? & Scaling up ML Experimentation

    We have two great talks lined up for this event. Scala 3, what does it means for me? By Joan Goyeau We’ve all heard about Dotty or Scala 3 either through Martin Odersky’s great talks or features listing on Dotty’s website. This sounds like a big change but how will it affect me as a Scala user in my day to day development? Here at Netflix we are processing millions of events per second with Scala, so we’ve hit a few corner cases of the language that often end up in complicated and boilerplate workarounds that new features in Scala 3 are believed to be solving. Please join this talk to see what the future of the Scala landscape looks like for you and discuss your own compilation stories. About Joan Goyeau Data Engineer @ Netflix Passionate about Scala and solving data related problems. Maintainer of Orkestra.tech, a typesafe CI/CD server as a library. Scaling up ML Experimentation at Tubi 5x and Beyond By Alexandros Bantis The Tubi.tv streaming app (https://tubitv.com/) is installed on over 50 million mobile and OTT devices. To meet the needs of a fast-growing audience Tubi is enabling rapid machine learning (ML) experimentation using Scala. Ranking Service serves pre-computed personalization requests. It is a critical component of our next-generation machine learning services that has helped ramp up our rate of experimentation by 5x. It's built with Scala/Akka, ScalaPB, Kinesis, ScyllaDB, and has experimentation support built into the domain model. This presentation will discuss some of the challenges, motivations and experiences related to this project. About Alexandros Bantis Alexandros Bantis, Senior Scala Engineer, Tubi Alexandros has been building out the next generation of ML personalization services at Tubi over the past year. Before that he spent three years at Apple building out the publishing pipeline for Apple.com. Outside of Scala, he can usually be found at the playground with his children.

  • Upgrade Your Future by John A. De Goes

    Iterable

    We are excited and greatly privileged to welcome John A. De Goes to the bay area for this meetup. We expect a big turnout so please RSVP early!!! Upgrade Your Future Scala’s Future has been the gateway drug for many developers to a world of async and concurrent programming. Future makes it easy to write concurrent code, and helps developers escape the horrors of callback hell that come from async code. However, as a first-generation data type for async and concurrent programming, Future is a decade old, and in this decade, the many drawbacks and pain points of Future have become extremely well-understood. In this presentation, John A. De Goes will introduce a young library for async and concurrent programming called ZIO, which is rapidly gaining adoption. ZIO presents a next-generation functional design that improves on Future in numerous ways. Learn from side-by-side code examples how ZIO enables you to write safer, more type-safe, more efficient, and saner code, that takes care of the messy real world problems like thread management, error management, and resource management. Discover why it’s time for your company to upgrade its Future with ZIO! About John A. De Goes A mathematician by training but a software engineer by vocation, John A. De Goes has been professionally writing software for more than 25 years. John has contributed to dozens of open source projects written in functional programming languages, including ZIO, a library for asynchronous and concurrent programming in functional Scala. In addition to speaking at Strata, OSCON, BigData TechCon, NEScala, ScalaWorld, Scala IO, flatMap, Scalar Conf, LambdaConf, and many other conferences, John also published a variety of books on programming. Currently, John consults at De Goes Consulting, a consultancy committed to solving hard business problems using the power of pure functional programming.

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  • Building microservices with Finagle and Scala & Migrating Medium's Architecture

    We have two great talks planned for this meetup: Talk1: Building microservices with Finagle and Scala Six years ago, Strava engineering (https://www.strava.com) introduced Finagle (https://twitter.github.io/finagle/) and with it, Scala into its tech stack as the primary way to build backend services. This has proved to be a pivotal decision, enabling a proliferation of backend services and the transition to a microservices-based architecture. More recently, they have formalized this growth into a set of long-term platform architecture principals, with a focus on Finagle and Scala as the backbone of this design. This talk will cover Strava's usage of Finagle and Scala, how it enables building backend services that are fast, efficient, and scalable, and how Scala and Finagle fit in with their long-term platform architecture, vision and growth. About Our Speaker Jeff Pollard is a Platform Engineer at Strava. His career has primarily focused on improving the scaling, reliability, and correctness of large, high volume, distributed systems. Other than computers, Jeff enjoys all things related to bikes, backpacking, skiing, and food. Talk2: 2 Fast 2 Furious: Migrating Medium's Architecture Without Slowing Down We’re shifting gears to leverage new technologies created since we built Medium 5 years ago, but we need to incrementally gain benefits from the new system along the way and we can’t afford to let it hinder feature development. By taking advantage of GraphQL’s flexibility and our existing infrastructure, we’re able to make widespread yet gradual architectural changes! Come see how Medium is changing lanes without slowing down. Anyone thinking about moving to GraphQL (or thinking about migrating an exisiting architecture in general) can benefit from this talk, but especially anyone who is building their own GraphQL server or needs practical advice on how to successfully migrate a legacy system to GraphQL without “stopping the world,” getting defunded partway through, or building a system no one uses. Abstract Migrating an entire system to new tools and frameworks isn’t an easy task. And doing that while not impacting feature development? That’s even harder. We’ll walk through how Medium is migrating off of our existing system, without hindering product development, and while also incrementally gaining the benefits of a new system along the way. We’ll go over the design of our new architecture, our phased migration approach, and how the layered structure of our GraphQL server (written in Scala with Sangria) was integral to the success of both. - Goals of the migration - Design of the new system - Phased approach - Phase 1: developer experience - IDLs (protobuf) + GraphQL - Phase 2: services + gRPC - GraphQL server layers - Fetchers - Repos - Schema (derivation) - Putting it all together About Our Speaker Sasha Solomon is a Senior Software Engineer helping build the next generation API on Twitter's GraphQL team. She was previously the Tech Lead of the Platforms team at Medium working on GraphQL as well. She has spoken at GraphQL Conf, GraphQL Asia, Scale by the Bay, and other meetups on various topics related to GraphQL and infrastructure. In her spare time, she enjoys tabletop RPGs, karaoke, and most recently, building mechanical keyboards. A Few important notes about this meetup: - Please arrive before 7pm to gain entry into event. Doors will be closed and no more people admitted from 7pm. - There are Bike Parking inside the office for this event.

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  • Integrating React with Scala at Domino Data Lab

    Domino Data Lab

    Do you hate JavaScript? Have you ever had a runtime error in your frontend? Is your UI written in Scala but you can't hire any frontend developers to work on it or backend developers that want to? Come hear about how Domino Data Lab faced these exact problems. Through trial and error we developed a way to inject React code into Scala Play, which maintains typesafety and takes advantage of JavaScript libraries to make frontend building faster. About the speaker: Niole Nelson builds Domino Data Lab's frontend. She likes to focus on making it harder to introduce runtime bugs and speed up development. While she isn't doing that, she is usually weight lifting or rock climbing. Her newest hobby is watching league of legends streamers, though she doesn't actually play the game.

  • Scale By the Bay 2019 CFP Open until May 31

    Needs a location

    Friends — the month of May is when the Scale By the Bay (SBTB) CFP always runs, for the conference in November. The CFP is now open at https://scale.bythebay.io There are three tracks, as usual: — Functional Programming — Service Architectures — Data Pipelines, including ML/AI The theme for this year is the emergence of new distributed systems and their applications, including Edge, IoT, DLT, and AI on the Edge. Helena Edelson lead a team at Apple enabling ML/AI with Spark, Joe Beda started Google Compute Engine and Kubernetes, and Heather Miller lead Scala Center at EPFL and now advances distributed and edge systems at CMU. We have two talk lengths, 20 minutes and 40 minutes. There are 5-10 minute breaks between some, but not all, talk slots, and excellent coffee is served all day long so every break is a coffee break. Please check each time length you can work with. We often ask 40 min talks to shrink to 20 min as we try to accommodate all the best talks — and our acceptabnce rate is going down to 1:3 with years. We also serve hot breakfast and great lunch and amazing happy hours follow the main program in between all days. The hallway track is legendary, facilitated by the high ratio of speakers — 100+ out of the 600 attendees. We are committed to community above all and are working with underrepresented groups to send speakers. Please share this CFP with your diversity advocates, community managers, and encourage female engineers, African-American developers, and others to submit talks. If you could send such speakers on behalf of your company, it will help the community a lot. We’re also proactively reaching out to meetups, our core constituents, to help our established diversity program. We also work with companies like Stripe on diversity scholarships — let us know if you’d like to partner on this. Submit your talks at https://scale.bythebay.io by May 31!

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  • (1) Migrating Medium to GraphQL (2) Thunder, Samsara GraphQL IoT Data Platform

    This is a joint meetup with SF GraphQL. Please register there => https://www.meetup.com/graphql-by-the-bay/events/261050384/ ----- Join us at Samsara for two great talks about GraphQL in production, spanning both hardware and software stacks! (1) 2 Fast 2 Furious: Migrating Medium's Architecture Without Slowing Down We’re shifting gears to leverage new technologies created since we built Medium 5 years ago, but we need to incrementally gain benefits from the new system along the way and we can’t afford to let it hinder feature development. By taking advantage of GraphQL’s flexibility and our existing infrastructure, we’re able to make widespread yet gradual architectural changes! Come see how Medium is changing lanes without slowing down. Anyone thinking about moving to GraphQL (or thinking about migrating an exisiting architecture in general) can benefit from this talk, but especially anyone who is building their own GraphQL server or needs practical advice on how to successfully migrate a legacy system to GraphQL without “stopping the world,” getting defunded partway through, or building a system no one uses. Abstract Migrating an entire system to new tools and frameworks isn’t an easy task. And doing that while not impacting feature development? That’s even harder. We’ll walk through how Medium is migrating off of our existing system, without hindering product development, and while also incrementally gaining the benefits of a new system along the way. We’ll go over the design of our new architecture, our phased migration approach, and how the layered structure of our GraphQL server (written in Scala with Sangria) was integral to the success of both. - Goals of the migration - Design of the new system - Phased approach - Phase 1: developer experience - IDLs (protobuf) + GraphQL - Phase 2: services + gRPC - GraphQL server layers - Fetchers - Repos - Schema (derivation) - Putting it all together Sasha Solomon is a Senior Software Engineer helping build the next generation API on Twitter's GraphQL team. She was previously the Tech Lead of the Platforms team at Medium working on GraphQL as well. She has spoken at GraphQL Conf, GraphQL Asia, Scale by the Bay (2019 CFP runs May 1-31 at http://scale.bythebay.io), and other meetups on various topics related to GraphQL and infrastructure. In her spare time, she enjoys tabletop RPGs, karaoke, and most recently, building mechanical keyboards. (2) GraphQL for the Samsara Sensor Data Plaform Samsara is a sensor data platform for operations, supporting a diverse set of features - everything from tracking vehicles in a fleet to monitoring quality control on a production line. In this talk, we’ll explore the origins and evolution of our GraphQL systems over the last three years and how they’ve helped us ship great products quickly and safely. Stephen is an infrastructure engineer at Samsara where he spends time thinking about making developer tools easy to understand, maintain, and use. He has worked on building both frontend and backend infrastructure to empower product teams and is a core contributor to Samsara’s open-source GraphQL framework, Thunder.

  • [Register at Bay.Area.AI] Applied Machine Learning: a Netflix Production

    This is a joint meetup By the Bay: register at http://bay.area.ai! ----- Applied Machine Learning is about as mature as Software Engineering circa 1998. For Data Scientists, it’s hard to collaborate, hard to be productive and hard to deploy to production. In the last 20 years, Software Engineers have become far more collaborative thanks to tools like git, far more productive thanks to cloud computing and far more effective at delivering quality software thanks to CI/CD and agile development practices. At Netflix, I get to work on problems like: how do we scale Data Science innovation by making collaboration effortless? How do we enable Data Scientists to single-handedly and reliably introduce their models to production? How do we make it easy to develop ML models that humans trust? More importantly, how do we use ML to make humans BETTER? In this talk, we’ll explore how Netflix is approaching these problems to further our mission of creating joy for our 125 Million+ members worldwide! Speaker: Julie Pitt leads the Machine Learning Infrastructure at Netflix, with the goal of scaling Data Science while increasing innovation. She previously built streaming infrastructure behind the "play" button while Netflix was transitioning from domestic DVD-by-mail service to international streaming service. Julie also co-founded Order of Magnitude Labs, with a mission to build AI capable of doing things that humans find easy and today’s machines find hard: exploration, communication, creativity and accomplishing long-range goals. Early in her career, Julie developed data processing software at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that enabled scientists to study the newly-sequenced human genome. ----- Julie is a regular speaker at Scale By the Bay, the 2019 CFP opens May 1 and ends May 31, submit your best talks early starting May 1 at http://scale.bythebay.io!

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  • Distributed GraphQL for Enterprise Systems

    Credit Karma

    (1) How we distributed our GraphQL across services to simplify workflows and increase developer productivity. Bio: Barry Dutton is a Senior Software developer at Credit Karma who has been instrumental in helping the Credit Karma team incorporate GraphQL into its microservices architecture. Before working at Credit Karma, he spent nearly a decade building core products and services at major tech companies, and ships code that reaches tens of millions of users. (2) Building a high-performance realtime GraphQL engine on Postgres at Hasura In this talk I'll talk about our unique approach to building a GraphQL server, by transpiling/compiling GraphQL to SQL instead of using resolvers. This approach allows low-latency, scalable querying with an extremely low-footprint, which becomes especially valuable for large GraphQL queries that fetch non-trivial amounts of data. These are the topics I'll cover: -- Compiling GraphQL to SQL -- Adding application user authorization primitives -- Implementing scalable, realtime with GraphQL subscriptions -- Benchmarks to show latency, concurrent connections Bio: Tanmai Gopal is the co-founder of hasura.io. He is a StackOverflow powered fullstack, polyglot developer whose areas of interest and work span react, GraphQL, nodejs, python, haskell, docker, postgres, kubernetes. He is passionate about making it easy to build things and is the instructor of India's largest MOOC imad.tech with over 250,000 students.

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  • Bill Venners introduces Property-based Testing in ScalaTest 3.1

    ScalaTest 3.1 will include built-in support for property-based testing. In this talk, Bill Venners will explain property-based testing, walk you through the design implementation of ScalaTest's support in 3, and compare it to ScalaCheck's approach. In addition, Bill will show a preview of Expectations and Facts, coming in ScalaTest 3.2, and show how Facts and property-based testing can be combined to describe and check contract specifications. Bill Venners is president of Artima, Inc., provider of Scala consulting, training, books, and tools. He leads the open source projects for the ScalaTest testing library and the Scalactic library for functional, object-oriented programming. He is coauthor with Martin Odersky and Lex Spoon of the book, Programming in Scala. And he is a community representative on the Scala Center's Advisory Board. ----- We're lucky to be in Bill's habitat, and he will teach special Scala retreats in March and April: Join us at a Scala Retreat! Step away from your daily routine and gather with other developers for a Scala learning experience surrounded by nature. In March and April, Bill Venners will be leading three Scala Retreats: March 18-20: Simply Scala Fundamentals, San Damiano, CA March 21-22: Simply Scala Advanced, San Damiano, CA April 8-9: Effective Scala, Palm Desert, CA Get more details and register here: https://www.artima.com/shop/workshop Enrollment is limited. Please register early.

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  • Scale By the Bay 2018

    Twitter HQ

    Dear Friends — we are proud to announce the program of Scale By the Bay 2018, our sixth year of the flagship, and by now iconic, independent developer conference By the Bay. (Tl;dr: get your spot at http://scale.bythebay.io while supplies last, and especially when Early Bird is in effect until August 31.) The conference follows the established three-day, three track structure, hosted for the third year in a row by Twitter HQ in its wonderful modern building, with all of its spacious tracks, community spaces, cozy booths, and the commons area where so many connections are made during the hallway track. This year, Martin Odersky, the creator of Scala, opens the main conference on November 15. Neha Narkhede, the co-creator of Kafka and cofounder of Confluent, is keynoting the day 2. The three tracks are — Functional and Thoughtful Programming — Reactive Microservices and Streaming Architectures — End-to-end Data Pipelines all the way up to Machine Learning and AI The 100 sessions include technology leaders such as Twitter, IBM, Microsoft, Salesforce, Fauna, DataStax, Databricks, Confluent, Credit Karma, Sumo Logic, GoPro, Buoyant, Workday, Zignal Labs, and many more. We cover your tools with JetBrains, your shopping with Best Buy and Target, your vacations with HomeAway, your listening with Spotify, your viewing with Netflix, your reading with Medium, and your banking with JP Morgan Chase. The list goes on and on and on — we have the most of the advanced stacks and approaches employed by the best that Silicon Valley offers to the world at scale, shared as best practices, with code, yours to learn, take home, and build upon. Our speakers span the whole spectrum from the first-time presenters with leading companies to veterans of SBTB going all the way back to 2013, evolving their craft before our eyes. You can follow their progress by watching their previous talks on http://functional.tv and the photos of the past conferences at https://meetup.bythebay.photo/Conferences/Scale-By-the-Bay The three panels, closing each day, are: — Thoughtful Software Engineering — Data Engineering for AI, and — Cloud, Edge, and Silver Lining. Each day begins with a hot breakfast, that begins an uninterruptible supply of Philz coffee through the whole day, and lunch is provided. On the first two days, the closing panels are followed by our signature happy hours, with great drinks, food, and conversation. The hallway tracks are legendary. SBTB is famous for its bespoke, all-day, build-yourself-a-company training. This year, we double it. Cliff Click, the legend of software engineering, is teaching a full day Advanced Software Engineering workshop on 11/13, followed by Ryan Knight, now of Fauna, leading cloud-native data pipelines on 11/14. The workshops are limited by 80 participants each. As last year, we’ll plan an unconference track for those who want to share their ideas in an intimate setting for joint brainstorming. The only thing moderate about SBTB is its size — we cap at 600 attendees to preserve the immediate and direct nature of the communication that happens, sparks that fly, and serendipity that always occurs. We are always sold out by the time the conference begins in November — so reserve your seat early at http://scale.bythebay.io! And enjoy the Early Bird that is in effect until August 31.

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