• Red Clocks by Leni Zumas
    In October we're reading Red Clocks by Leni Zumas. It has 368 pages and starts at $7.88 on Amazon. There are 16 copies at the library, 8 of which are currently available. We chat for the first half hour while everyone arrives and orders whatever food and drink they'd like, then we cover discussion questions (splitting into groups if we are more than about 6), and at the end we vote on our next book. If you're able, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover Meetup fees. Here's the description of Red Clocks from Amazon: Five women. One question. What is a woman for? In this ferociously imaginative novel, abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights of life, liberty, and property to every embryo. In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom. Ro, a single high-school teacher, is trying to have a baby on her own, while also writing a biography of Eivør, a little-known 19th-century female polar explorer. Susan is a frustrated mother of two, trapped in a crumbling marriage. Mattie is the adopted daughter of doting parents and one of Ro's best students, who finds herself pregnant with nowhere to turn. And Gin is the gifted, forest-dwelling herbalist, or "mender," who brings all their fates together when she's arrested and put on trial in a frenzied modern-day witch hunt. RED CLOCKS is at once a riveting drama, whose mysteries unfold with magnetic energy, and a shattering novel of ideas. In the vein of Margaret Atwood and Eileen Myles, Leni Zumas fearlessly explores the contours of female experience, evoking THE HANDMAID'S TALE for a new millennium. This is a story of resilience, transformation, and hope in tumultuous-even frightening-times.

    Eclipse Chocolate Bar and Bistro

    2145 Fern Street · San Diego, CA

    5 comments
  • Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi
    In September we're reading Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi. It has 537 pages and starts at $9.89 on Amazon. There are 21 copies at the library and 61 holds on those copies. That's why this is September's book instead of August's. If you have a copy of the book and are willing to lend it to a fellow member, please post and coordinate amongst yourselves. We chat for the first half hour while everyone arrives and orders whatever food and drink they'd like, then we cover discussion questions (splitting into groups if we are more than about 6), and at the end we vote on our next book. If you're able, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover Meetup fees. Here's the description of Children of Blood and Bone from the Tomi Adeyemi's website: Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls. But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope. Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good. Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers—and her growing feelings for an enemy. And these are our discussion questions: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5727a8d6f699bb94e2b170a4/t/5abee92f88251bcf7a09bd4a/1522460984823/CHILDREN+OF+BLOOD+AND+BONE+SCHOOL+GUIDE.pdf

    Eclipse Chocolate Bar and Bistro

    2145 Fern Street · San Diego, CA

    14 comments
  • The Power by Naomi Alderman
    We're skipping July because I'm taking a break, but we'll be back in August with The Power by Naomi Alderman. If you're able, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation at bookclub to help cover the Meetup fees. The Power is 400 pages and starts at $9.95 on Amazon. There are 58 copies at the library and 28 holds on those copies. If you have the book and would be willing to lend it to a fellow member, please post and coordinate amongst yourselves. We chat for the first half hour or so while people arrive and order food and drink, then we tackle our discussion questions, and at the end we choose the next book to add to our calendar. We will probably be in the back room. Here's a description of The Power from the author: It's a piece of feminist science fiction - or speculative fiction, or fiction about a fictional thing rather than a real thing (curious concept). In the novel, very suddenly almost all the women in the world develop the power to electrocute people at will. Anything from a tiny tingle all the way to full electro-death. And then everything is different. The novel follows four main characters as they pick their way across this changed world. There's Roxy, the daughter of a London crime family with three older brothers; she was never supposed to take over the family business but she starts to have other ideas. There's Tunde, a young journalism student in Lagos, who sees that the revolution needs documenting, and gets himself into some dicey situations trying to be the one to do it. There's Allie, who comes from a troubled background in the South of the USA and sees that what people need is something new to believe in. And there's Margot, who was a low-level politician in New England but begins to have new ambitions. It's a novel of ideas - what would happen if women had the power to cause pain and destruction? Do we really believe that women are naturally peaceful and nurturing? How much of gender is in our expectations of violence? But it's also a thriller; in pursuit of power each of the main characters will eventually come into conflict with the others, and they're each a force to be reckoned with. At the novel's heart is the question of power: who has it, how do you get it, what does it do to you when you've got it? And when you wield the power, how long will it be before the power wields you?

    Eclipse Chcolate

    2145 Fern Street · San Diego, CA

    9 comments
  • Delusions of Gender by Cordelia Fine
    Bookclub is always free. If you are willing though, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover the cost of our Meetup fees, and on the off chance I collect more than that, I get myself a drink or two. We chose two at our last meeting, and this one is shorter, so it's first: Delusions of Gender, How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference by Cordelia Fine. Two of three copies are currently available at the library, and it ranges in price on Amazon from $6.34 -$36.34. It is 369 pages long. Here’s the summary from the publisher: “[Fine’s] sharp tongue is tempered with humor. . . . Read this book and see how complex and fascinating the whole issue is.”—The New York Times It’s the twenty-first century, and although we tried to rear unisex children—boys who play with dolls and girls who like trucks—we failed. Even though the glass ceiling is cracked, most women stay comfortably beneath it. And everywhere we hear about vitally important “hardwired” differences between male and female brains. The neuroscience that we read about in magazines, newspaper articles, books, and sometimes even scientific journals increasingly tells a tale of two brains, and the result is more often than not a validation of the status quo. Women, it seems, are just too intuitive for math; men too focused for housework. Drawing on the latest research in neuroscience and psychology, Cordelia Fine debunks the myth of hardwired differences between men’s and women’s brains, unraveling the evidence behind such claims as men’s brains aren’t wired for empathy and women’s brains aren’t made to fix cars. She then goes one step further, offering a very different explanation of the dissimilarities between men’s and women’s behavior. Instead of a “male brain” and a “female brain,” Fine gives us a glimpse of plastic, mutable minds that are continuously influenced by cultural assumptions about gender. Passionately argued and unfailingly astute, Delusions of Gender provides us with a much-needed corrective to the belief that men’s and women’s brains are intrinsically different—a belief that, as Fine shows with insight and humor, all too often works to the detriment of ourselves and our society. • What to bring Your exquisite mind. • Important to know There's a big parking lot behind the building. We typically sit on the front patio 'cause it's a little quieter.

    57 Degrees

    1735 Hancock Street · San Diego, CA

    3 comments
  • An Excess Male by Maggie Shen King
    Bookclub is always free. If you are willing though, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover the cost of our Meetup fees, and on the off chance I collect more than that, I get myself a drink or two. We chose a novel for May: An Excess Male by Maggie Shen King. There are multiple available copies at the library and it ranges in price on Amazon from $5.30 -$10.99. It is 416 pages long. Here’s the summary from the publisher: China’s one-child policy and its cultural preference for male heirs have created a society overrun by forty million unmarriageable men. By the year 2030, more than 25 percent of men in their late thirties will not have a family of their own. An Excess Male is the story of one such leftover man’s quest for love and family under a State that seeks to glorify its past mistakes and impose order through authoritarian measures, reinvigorated communist ideals, and social engineering. Wi-guo holds fast to the belief that as long as he continues to improve himself, his small business, and, in turn, his country, his chance at love will come. He finally saves up the dowry required to enter matchmaking talks at the lowest rung, as a third husband—the maximum allowed by law. Only a single family—one harboring an illegal spouse—shows interest, yet with May-ling and her two husbands, Wei-guo feels seen, heard, and connected like never before. But everyone and everything—walls, streetlights, garbage cans—are listening, and men, excess or not, are dispensable to the State. Wei-guo must reach a new understanding of patriotism and test the limits of his love and his resolve in order to save himself and this family he has come to hold dear. In Maggie Shen King’s startling and beautiful debut, An Excess Male explores the intersection of marriage, family, gender, and state in an all-too-plausible future. • What to bring Your exquisite mind. • Important to know There's a big parking lot behind the building. We typically sit on the front patio 'cause it's a little quieter.

    57 Degrees

    1735 Hancock Street · San Diego, CA

    18 comments
  • The H-Spot: A Feminist Pursuit of Happiness by Jill Filipovic
    We are in a trying-out-new-venues phase of bookclub. This time we're trying Eclipse Chocolate in South Park. Sometimes parking can be tough, but in my experience, if you drive into the residential parts a little, parking can always be had. See you there! Bookclub is always free. If you are willing though, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover the cost of our Meetup fees, and on the off chance I collect more than that, I get myself a drink or two. We chose The H Spot: A Feminist Pursuit of Happiness by Jill Filipovic for April’s book. There are four copies at the library, and they are currently all checked out, but there are no holds on those copies. It ranges in price on Amazon from $6.47 -- $18.13 and is 336 pages long. Here’s the summary from the publisher: What do women want? The same thing men were promised in the Declaration of Independence: happiness, or at least the freedom to pursue it. For women, though, pursuing happiness is a complicated endeavor, and if you head out into America and talk to women one-on-one, as Jill Filipovic has done, you’ll see that happiness is indelibly shaped by the constraints of gender, the expectations of feminine sacrifice, and the myriad ways that womanhood itself differs along lines of race, class, location, and identity. In The H-Spot, Filipovic argues that the main obstacle standing in-between women and happiness is a rigged system. In this world of unfinished feminism, men have long been able to “have it all” because of free female labor, while the bar of achievement for women has only gotten higher. Never before have women at every economic level had to work so much (whether it’s to be an accomplished white-collar employee or just make ends meet). Never before have the standards of feminine perfection been so high. And never before have the requirements for being a “good mother” been so extreme. If our laws and policies made women’s happiness and fulfillment a goal in and of itself, Filipovic contends, many of our country’s most contentious political issues–from reproductive rights to equal pay to welfare spending–would swiftly be resolved. Filipovic argues that it is more important than ever to prioritize women’s happiness-and that doing so will make men’s lives better, too. Here, she provides an outline for a feminist movement we all need and a blueprint for how policy, laws, and society can deliver on the promise of the pursuit of happiness for all. • What to bring Your wonderful mind. • Important to know

    Eclipse Chcolate

    2145 Fern Street · San Diego, CA

    7 comments
  • A Wrinkle In Time, Morning Movie!
    Bookclub (sometimes Movieclub) is always free, but I am also happy to accept donations towards our monthly Meetup fees. I am so excited to hear everyone's opinions about this book and movie. We're going to the 11:10am showing at the Mission Valley 20, and we'll grab some food at Ruby's afterwards. I'll stay out in front of the theater until 10:50am holding the bookclub rainbow pinwheel, but I like getting seats early, so if you're later than that come find us inside. See you there!

    AMC Mission Valley 20

    1640 Camino Del Rio N · San Diego

    5 comments
  • A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle, March Bookclub
    Bookclub is always free. If you are willing though, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover the cost of our Meetup fees, and on the off chance I collect more than that, I get myself a drink or two. For March, we’re reading A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. The two books we chose at last month’s meeting are both pretty long, so I pushed them to April and May. A Wrinkle in Time ranges in price on Amazon is $3.49 -- $6.99, and although there are a great many copies at the library, there are also a great many holds, and very few formats are currently available. Here’s the summary from the publisher (which for some reason makes it sound like Calvin is the main character, nope! This is Meg’s story!) It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger. “Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I’ll be on my way. Speaking of ways, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract.” A tesseract (in case the reader doesn’t know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Miss L’Engle’s unusual book. A Wrinkle in Time, winner of the Newbery Medal in 1963, is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O’Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school). They are in search of Meg’s father, a scientist who disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government on the tesseract problem.

    Refill

    3752 Park Boulevard · San Diego, CA

    5 comments
  • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia
    • What we'll do Book club is always free. If you are willing though, I appreciate a $2-$3 donation to help cover the cost of our Meetup fees, and on the off chance I collect more than that, I get myself a drink or two. Our February book is One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia. It's a short (200ish pages) young adult novel that has won the Coretta Scott King Award and the Newbery Honor Medal, (among a bunch of other awards.) It is readily available at the library, and ranges in price from $1.68 (+shipping) to $11.89 on Amazon. We always spend the first 20ish minutes meeting each other and ordering food and drinks. Once we get into discussion, we usually go a little over an hour, and we wrap up by nominating books and voting on which one to put next our list. Here's the description of One Crazy Summer from the Publisher, Harper Collins: In this Newbery Honor novel, New York Times bestselling author Rita Williams-Garcia tells the story of three sisters who travel to Oakland, California, in 1968 to meet the mother who abandoned them. "This vibrant and moving award-winning novel has heart to spare."* Eleven-year-old Delphine is like a mother to her two younger sisters, Vonetta and Fern. She's had to be, ever since their mother, Cecile, left them seven years ago for a radical new life in California. But when the sisters arrive from Brooklyn to spend the summer with their mother, Cecile is nothing like they imagined. While the girls hope to go to Disneyland and meet Tinker Bell, their mother sends them to a day camp run by the Black Panthers. Unexpectedly, Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern learn much about their family, their country, and themselves during one truly crazy summer. This moving, funny novel won the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction and the Coretta Scott King Award and was a National Book Award Finalist. Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern's story continues in P.S. Be Eleven and Gone Crazy in Alabama. Readers who enjoy Christopher Paul Curtis's The Watsons Go to Birmingham and Jacqueline Woodson’s Brown Girl Dreaming will find much to love in One Crazy Summer. This novel was the first featured title for Marley D’s Reading Party, launched after the success of #1000BlackGirlBooks. Maria Russo, in a New York Times list of "great kids' books with diverse characters," called it "witty and original." • What to bring your dazzling mind • Important to know

    57 Degrees

    1735 Hancock Street · San Diego, CA

    7 comments
  • Food and Drinks
    • What we'll do Yep, I'm behind on planning actual book clubs. I promise there will be a new up in a few days. In the meantime, anyone want to just come socialize? We can still talk about books of course, but also how everyone is doing, and how we're holding it together in this cruel and scary political climate. Maybe we will trade pics of adorable puppies or something. I'm hosting Mondays at Blind Lady Ale House, where in January, a portion of all meatless sales will go to another organization I'm involved with, The San Diego Area Chapter of NOW. You won't miss me, there will be plenty of NOW swag. See you there! • What to bring your dazzling mind. • Important to know

    Blind Lady Ale House

    3416 Adams Ave · San Diego

    2 comments