Past Meetup

Humpday Urban Hike in Alamo Heights

This Meetup is past

7 people went

250 Viesca St

250 Viesca St · Alamo Heights, Te

How to find us

We will park in the back lot of the complex. It is well lite and seems safe.

Location image of event venue

Details

Walking for Health
Experts agree that any amount of walking is good for you, but to get the maximum benefits of walking, you need to log some mileage and increase your intensity.

The minimum prescription for good health is 30 minutes of moderate intensity walking, five days per week. “More is better, but you can get a significant portion of the health benefits of walking even with just that moderate amount,” Sallis says.

Here are five research-backed ways to sneak more steps into every day—as well as get the most out of every step you take.

1. Walk as much as you can. The University of Warwick study compared people with at least one sign of metabolic syndrome—which is a group of risk factors (high blood pressure, fat around the waist, high blood sugar, and high triglycerides and cholesterol) that lead to heart disease—to those with no risk factors. They found that those who got the least activity had the most risk factors, and those who walked the most—accumulating at least 15,000 steps per day—had healthy BMIs, smaller waists, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and better blood sugar control.

Many people aim for a daily goal of 10,000 steps (or about 5 miles)—and an industry of fitness tracking devices has emerged to support them—but that magic number didn’t originate from scientific research, says John Schuna Jr., Ph.D., assistant professor of kinesiology at Oregon State College of Public Health. “It was first used in a Japanese marketing effort associated with one of the first commercial pedometers.” The device was called “manpo-kei,” which literally means "10,000 steps meter" in Japanese.

“The 10,000 steps goal is thought to be a realistic minimum, and it’s good, but for complete risk reduction, people should aim for more,” says William Tigbe, M.D., Ph.D., a physician and public health researcher at University of Warwick and lead author of the study showing that 15,000 steps per day can lead to greater benefits. “In our study, those who took 5,000 extra steps had no metabolic syndrome risk factors at all.”

2. Pick up the pace. Another way to get more out of even a shorter walk is to do it faster. A recent study looked at not just the total number of steps people took per day but also how quickly they took them. “Those who had a faster stepping rate had similar health outcomes—lower BMI and lower waist circumference—as those who took the most steps per day,” says Schuna, one of the study authors. He recommends trying for a minimum of 100 steps per minute (roughly 2.5 to 3 miles per hour) or as brisk a pace as you can (135 steps per minute will get you up to about a 4 mph pace).

3. Break it up. “We cannot accumulate 15,000 steps in leisure time only,” reasons Tigbe. “But if you take walking breaks throughout the day, it is doable.” Aim for bouts of 10 minutes or more at a time of brisk walking. You’ll get in more steps and decrease the amount of time you spend being sedentary—which is a big risk factor for heart disease.

4. Try intervals. Instead of doing an entire 30-minute walk at the same moderate pace, try high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Alternate between 30-second to 1-minute bursts of faster walking, followed by a minute or two of slower-paced recovery was a better option.

5. Take it uphill. “Think of it as getting two for one,” says Sallis. “When you increase your intensity, such as walking up a steep hill, you get the equivalent benefit in half the time.”

Adults only
No sweep is available. It is up to you to keep up with the group.
We will regroup every turn but we will wait only a couple of minutes. The first few times we will keep it tight so everyone can learn the route.

Woohoo a new route until the hike at Eisenhower starts in the spring!

Bring:
Water
Light source
Walking shoes
Bug stray might be needed sometimes? Better to have some. I always care some.